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Your letter written under that of mr Copeland of June 14. is recieved with the Boston Patriot of June 12. therein inclosed. the date of the letter of mr Adams after which you enquire was of Sep. 18. mr Elwin, grandson of Gov r Langdon happened to be with me at the reciept of your letter, and I asked him to assist me in comparing the printed copy in the Boston patriot with the MS. in my hands....
I have for several years past declined subscribing for new publications, from the uncertainty of my living to recieve them, and an unwillingness to leave my family subject to multiplied calls. I break through my rule however by subscribing to that you propose, and now return your paper with my name and best wishes for it’s success, and assurances of my respects. NNGL .
Your letter of the 15 th is recieved. I remember well your father Anthony Mullins, or little Anthony as he was called, his Italian name being Antonio Molini; but I do not remember that he particularly became a souldier in the Revolution war. I only recollect the general fact that Mazzei’s undertaking to make wine at Colle was broken up by several of his people engaging in the army. my almost...
I thank you, Sir, for the copies of the Review of mr Adams’s oration, and of your message to your legislature, which you have been so kind as to send me. I remember well mr Josiah Bartlett and Gen l W m Whipple, two of the members of your state who signed the Declaration of Independance. from the latter I recieved many attentions and civilities, during a visit I made to Portsmouth in 1784. I...
Other engagements have prevented my earlier attention to the enquiries of your’s of the 3 d as to the title of the late Col o Skipwith to the lands at Indian Camp. that title is unquestionable. the part of the tract , called Indian Camp was originally 2,400. a s (if I recollect the quantity correctly) the property of Francis Eppes of the Hundred, who had a son, Col o Rich d Eppes (father of)...
Your favor of the 14 th has been duly recieved. the Visitors of the University, at their meeting in April last, having been able to fix on a day, (the 1 st of Feb next) for opening that institution, proceeded to consider the subject of Professors for the different schools, of which you will see the number and titles in the paper inclosed. I laid before them the applications which had been...
your favor of the 8 th has been duly recieved. I inclose you a printed notice respecting our University in which you will find stated the titles of the schools proposed to be established in that institution, and the distribn of the sciences among them. you will observe that the teaching of the English language will belong to the two professors of antient & modern languages. geography antient...
No one is more sensible than myself of the importance to every country, of the science of political economy, of the defect of it in our own country, or of the danger of undertaking to direct it’s industry without a clear sighted view of all it’s bearings, and of it’s complicated entanglements foreign and domestic. in this science, as in Medecine, it is best to leave nature to her own agency...
I thank you, Sir, for the copy of the beautiful Address to the American academy of the Fine arts, which you have been so kind as to send me. I have great pleasure in seeing them so engagingly inculcated, and in observing, by the catalogue of articles exhibited, that so many specimens are possessed capable of exercising the eye in the study of these fascinating arts. they furnish a valuable...
Your favor of Nov. 12. of the last year, with the wines & other articles, as by your acc t of the same date, were rec d by the Collector of Phila in January. immediately on his transmission of your letter to me, I wrote to mess rs Degrand and Copeland of Boston to ascertain to which the remittance of the am t should be made. their answer of Feb. 13. that mr Copeland would recieve it came to...
I am much indebted for your kind letter of Feb. 29. and for your valuable volume on the English constitution. I have read this with pleasure, and much approbation, and think it has deduced the constitution of the English nation from it’s rightful root, the Anglo-Saxon. it is really wonderful that so many able and learned men should have failed in their attempts to define it with correctness....
The printer having disappointed me in getting ready, in time to send to you before your departure, the original report of the plan of our University, I now inclose you half a dozen copies, one for D r Stuart, the others to be disposed of as you please. I am sorry to inform you that we fail in getting the contingent donation of 50. M .D. made to us by our last legislature. so we have nothing...
Taking for granted this will reach you while mr Gilmer is still in England, I take the liberty of putting a letter for him, under the protection of your cover, to ensure it’s safe reciept by him. should it however, by any accident, loiter on the way until he should be on his return, I will request of you to open the letter to him, and to take out, and have delivered to Maj r Cartwright, one it...
Your habitual kindness to me occasions me to trouble you oftner than I ought to do . a gentleman now here informs me he saw a book in the bookstore of a mr Thomson in Wash n so recently published in England that I did not expect a copy had got to America. it is Jones Greek and English Lexicon, costing in England 30.ƒ. sterl. or 6.67 for which however he says mr T. asked 12.D. an advance of 80....
I am thankful to you for the transmission of the Albion papers and the kind offer of continuing to do so regularly but I will not give you that trouble. I read but a single paper our Enquirer, which gives as much as I wish to know of what is going on. it is time for me to resign to a younger generation the direction of their concerns, and I do it chearfully—a friend in England sends me the...
I recieved, a few days ago, a pamphlet on the subject of America, England and the Holy alliance, and read it with unusual interest and concurrence of opinion. it furnished a simple and satisfactory key for the solution of all the riddles of British conduct & policy. while considering and conjecturing who could be it’s author, I happened to cast my eye on the few words of superscription, and...
If mr M c Kenny thinks the information on the preceding leaf may be as interesting as other matter provided for his next paper, he is free to use it; if he should not have room in his first paper Th: Jefferson asks it’s return to be forwarded to the enquirer. ViU .
The University of Virginia. The period for opening this institution being ultimately fixed to the 1 st day of Feb. next, some previous information respecting it may be acceptable to the public, and useful to individuals who may have views of availing themselves of it’s benefits. and our press being on the spot, as it were, it seems incumbent on us particularly to give that information, which...
The distress in which I am to meet debts of the most pressing urgency obliges me to remind you of the arrearages due to me on the mill account. according to the account rendered by yourself to the 1 st of last July there was then a balance acknoleged due of 650.09D my acc t made it more. this difference was left to Jefferson to settle with you, and it was agreed between you to arbitrate it as...
Your letter of Feb. 15. was not answered because we were in daily expectation of the vote of a donation, by our legislature, to enable us to purchase books and apparatus for our University. the vote was afterwards past but rested on a contingency, the failure of which was not made known to me until since the reciept of your favor of the 8 th inst. inclosing a catalogue of one of the libraries...
A GENERAL GARDENING CALENDAR, Being a copy of one in use by an Illustrious Philosopher and cultivator of literature and the peaceful arts, not far from Charlottesville in Virginia. Feb. 1. Hophills —manure and dress them. Asparagus —dress and replant. 15. Sow Frame-Peas , the first open weather. Sow Lettuce and Radishes . Spinage —sow. Celery
I have found my letters for Europe to which I have taken the liberty of asking your attention get always to their destination with so much certainty, that I am tempted to abuse your goodness by often asking the same favor. the communicns with Leghorn, which the wants of our university will still for a while continue, are so necessary to that instn as to render their safe transmission greatly...
The construction of the University of Virginia, in which we have been some time engaged, having occasioned us to charge mr Appleton of Leghorn with several successive commissions for articles we want, I have been indebted to him for the advantage of passing our remittances and letters thro’ you. and I have found the passages you have been so good as to give them so safe and expeditious that I...
private In your letter of Feb. 8., in answer to my enquiries on the subject, you inform me of the price of best plain, polished marble slabs, proper for the fascia of architraves for fire places, I can reduce the fire places in my house to 2. sizes, and I must request you to furnish me marble fascia for 3. larger & 5. smaller ones as follows all plain without any moulding 6. plinths 9 inches...
sq. I for these 5. rooms then order + 10. plinths 6¼ by 7. I. 1240 10. side fascia 5½ I. wide 31¼ high } 3093 5. horizont fascia 5½ I. wide 50. I. long + for the Hall use the 2. cast-off plinths of the Parlour 4333 = + 30. sq 144 NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
My last to you was of Nov. 22. since which I have recieved yours of Dec. 24. and Feb. 8. in consequence of the information given in the last that the first quality of marble squares for paving the Portico of our Rotunda, polished and accurately squared ready to be laid down, of one foot square, will cost at Leghorn 221/12D. the hundred’ I am now to desire you to send us 1200 squares of one...
I have to thank you, dear Sir, for the volume of chemistry which you have been so kind as to send me. the attention which prevails through the whole work to apply it’s science to the utilities of life gives it that high merit for which your illustrious ancestor was so distinguished. he seemed to pursue no discoveries but with a view to the uses of man. I have to apologise for the qui pro quo...
I am very thankful Gentlemen for your kind recollections on the approach of the Anniversary of the great father of Natural history. it would certainly be a great enjoyment to be present and to participate with his worthy disciples of the Society of N. York. at their celebration of his birth. as that prospect however recedes from my view, another advances with steady and not distant steps, that...
The Baron de Ferrusac of Paris (not otherwise known to me) has sent me the inclosed letter and pamphlet, proposing to extend to this country a correspondence established with other parts of the world for the purposes therein explained. age and retirement unfit and disqualify me f rom undertaking such a correspondence. I have supposed it possible however that the Philosophical society might...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 10 th instant. as soon as the vote of invitation to M. de la Fayette had passed one house, and was likely to pass the other, I wrote to the President, and to a member or two of Congress, expressing my confidence that they could not mean merely to invite him to come and dine; suggesting the scantiness of his means of meeting expence, and the necessity of a...
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr. Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting Wm. & Mary Coll. which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return when read, that I may be enabled to lodge my answer in Richmd. before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
Your favor of the 5 th from Williamsburg has been duly received, and presents to us a case of pregnant character, admitting important issues, and requiring serious consideration and conduct. yet I am more inclined to view it with hope than dismay. it involves two questions. 1. shall the College of Wm. & Mary be removed? 2. to what place? as to the first I never doubted the lawful authority of...
your favor of the 11 th is just recieved. our University will be opened on the 1 st day of February next. the qualifications for reception in the schools of Mathematics & Nat. Philosophy will be a good acquaintance with numerical arithmetic as far as Fractions & extractions of the roots, and in the classical school for Latin to be able to read the higher authors, with facility paying strict...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to mr Lee for the copy of the Campaign of 1781. in the Carolinas, and the list of errata of impression which he has been so kind as to send him. the subject is interesting and will be read with pleasure. with his thanks he prays him to accept the assurance of his great respect and esteem. ViHi .
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting W m & Mary College, which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter, as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return, when read, that I may be able to lodge my answer in Richmond before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to Major O’Connor for the treatise on the science of war & fortifications which he has been so kind as to send him. too far advanced in years to attend to subjects of that kind he will beg leave to place it where it will become truly useful in the library of the University of Virginia which will be opened now with little delay. from this institution he hopes a...
A neighborhood debt obliged me to draw on you in favor of John Winn for 64.85 which I do with reluctance until we get tob o down, or recieve monies due. M r Thompson Collector of N. York has sent to your care for me a box of seeds from France for which he has paid charges 1D.90c can you remit him so small a sum? affect ly yours MHi .
I really thought that the assumpsit for mr Bacon had been paid long ago by my grandson to whom I have committed all my affairs, or it should not have laid so long unnoticed. I now inclose you an order on Col o Peyton for that and mr Massie’s debt and salute you with esteem & respect MHi .
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr Goodacre and his son to dine with him to-day at 3. oclock. Privately owned.
You are one of the best friends in the world, because you attend to the smallest things, which are often more gratifying than great ones. I saw yesterday in the hands of mr Dyer a fountain pen, one of the best I ever saw. he said it was made for him by mr Cowan, a watchmaker of Richmond. and cost him 5. D. the outer tube was of silver, but the two leaves of the pen were gold, and no other...
Your favor of the 6 th is recieved. the visitors of our University at their last session concluding to open it at the commencement of the next year, found it necessary to take immediate measures for procuring Professors. they wished than to be of the 1 st order of science in their respective lines, and doubting whether such could be found in the unemployed portion of science in the US. they...
Your favor of the 6 th is recieved, with the two volumes you were so kind as to send me, for which be pleased to accept my thanks. with respect to mr Audrain, his mathematical talents are well known to be of the first grade of that science in the US. and such as any seminary might be proud to have in it’s employ. but we are committed beyond retraction. the Visitors of our University, at their...
I have duly recieved M. le Baron, the letter of Jan. 7. with which you have been pleased to honor me and the pamphlet accompanying it, explaining the views of the society formed at Paris for the collection and interchange of information between the different parts of the world. the object is worthy of the highly respected names associated with it and at an early period of life the honor of...
M r Cox’s draught on you for the Scuppernon wine is right. I think I had in a former letter advised you that such an one would be made. in your last account rendered I find an omission of a credit of 300. D. the price of a negro woman of mine sold in Richmond, and directed, as I understood to be paid to you. I shall have to draw on you immediately for Raphael’s quarterly bill, something...
My last ride to the University and return without getting off of my horse, with the heat of the day so overcome me with fatigue that I could scarcely reach home, and still leaves me so sore and languid that I have not been on my horse since, nor shall I be able yet for some days. if therefore any consultation is necessary with me I must ask the favor of yourself and mr Bergamin to take a ride...
Having from the necessities of age been obliged to turn over the whole of my affairs to my gr. son Jefferson, I specially recommended to his attention my debt to you, and I know he contemplates doing what can be done in it, as soon as the tob o of the last year gets to market from this place and Bedford. I shall deliver him your letter that he may keep it in view. accept friendly salutns MHi .
I return you mr Cathcart’s letter, and to his, I join sincerely my own thanks for what you have obtained for him. you could never have served nor the government take into it’s employ a man of stricter integrity. while consul on the Barbary coast, where immense sums past thro’ his hands to be disposed of without a voucher, he might have made himself, as some colleagues did, as rich as he...
Your favor of the 23 d ult. has been recieved. I have diligently gone over your father’s correspondence with me, which is very voluminous, and I send you the only letters which seem! to answer the purposes you have in view. they are 4. in number, to wit June 12. July 11. and Oct. 14. 1812. and June 12. 1820. the 3. first of these will shew he was aware that he was tenant for life only by...
John W. Eppes, late of Buckingham was in his lifetime seised & possessed, in right of his wife, of a tract of land of 819. acres, in the county of Albemarle, called Pantops. the wife died, leaving an only child, the present Francis Eppes. the father, supposing it would be for the benefit of his son, sold the land during his infancy for the sum of 11,000. D. guarantying the confirmation of his...
your favor of the 18 th ult. has been recieved. the scheme of educn originally proposed to our legislature embraced 3. grades, 1. primary schools. 2. intermediate colleges. 3. an University. they adopted the 1 st & last but have not yet acted on the intermediate grade. this was meant to be preparatory for the University. it was to teach the classical languages, numerical arithmetic, the...