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Extract ( NA : PCC , No. 71, I, 523–24). This document, in Theodorick Bland’s hand, is endorsed, “Extract of a letter from the govr. of Virginia dated November 17–80 referred to the Board of Treasury.” To this notation was added, probably by a clerk of Congress or the Board of Treasury, “Treasury Board 21st. Decr. 1780 Make two Copies of the Order of Congress of the 15th Instant respecting...
At the request of the honorable Theodorick Bland I take the liberty of laying before the General Assembly the inclosed paper in which he states a difficulty which has arisen in reconciling his qualification as a delegate to the peculiar channel into which he had previously turned his private fortune. From the inclosed extract of a Letter from our Delegates in Congress you will also perceive...
With respect to the payment made on behalf of Mr. Braxton into the Continental treasury in Part of our Quota of the fifteen Million tax, the Executive having been Charged with the raising and remitting that money, we have thought it unnecessary to lay it before the Legislature. The Sum to be sent, was sent, partly in Money and Partly in Bills. These Bills were drawn in Continental Dollars ,...
The vessel which had been sent by Genl. Leslie, to Charles town as we supposed, returned about the 12th. inst. The enemy began to embark soon after from Portsmouth, and in the night of the 15th. compleated the embarkation of their whole force. In the morning of the 16th. some of our people entered Portsmouth. They had left their works unfinished and undestroyed. Great numbers of negroes who...
The vessel which had been sent by General Leslie to Charles town as we supposed, returned about the 12th. inst. The enemy began to embark soon after from Portsmouth, and in the night of the 15th. compleated the embarkation of their whole force. In the morning of the 16th. some of our people entered Portsmouth. They had left their works unfinished and undestroyed. Great numbers of negroes who...
Richmond, 19 Nov. 1780. The first paragraph of this letter is identical with the first paragraph in TJ’s letter to Gates of this date, except that after “coming up James river” TJ here adds: “or I suppose any other of the waters of the Chesapeake.” The second paragraph of the letter to Lee is identical with the second paragraph of TJ’s letter to Huntington of this date, except that it lacks...
Richmond, 19 Nov. 1780. The first paragraph of this letter is identical with the first paragraph in TJ’s letter to Gates of this date. The second and last paragraph (except for the usual complimentary close) reads: “Since writing so far, your favour of the 10th comes to hand with the Letter from Genl. Gates and Genl. Morgan . Strange derangements indeed our Riders are got into to be comeing 9...
[ Richmond, 20? Nov. 1780. JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , Oct. 1780, 1827 edn., p. 22 (20 Nov.): “The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Governor, containing information respecting the embarkation of the enemy from Portsmouth, which was read and ordered to lie on the table.” Not located.]
The enclosed Letter from the President of Congress with the resolutions of that honourable body of the fourth instant, having come to hand yesterday and being intended for the consideration of the Legislature, I beg leave through you to transmit them to the General Assembly, and have the honor to be with every sentiment of esteem and respect, Sir, Your most obedient and most humble servant, RC...
On receipt of your favour by Colo. Mead we offered the office of Deputy quarter master General for the Continent in this state to a Mr. George Divers, a person qualified in every point for exercising it as we wou’d wish it to be. A peculiarity in the present situation of his private affairs has however prevented his acceptance of it. I have this day written to major Foresythe to know if he...
Major Nelson, commanding officer of the three troops of cavalry belonging to this state but in continental service informs me on the part of his officers that they find the service extremely discouraging on account of the preference in command given to Continental officers of the same rank tho junior in their appointments, and pray that they may be placed on continental establishment without...
Colo. Muter will be pleased to have an account made out of all the powder &c. lent or delivered for Continental use since the establishment of the Board of War that we may require a return of it. Also to call on Mr. Maupin for a state of all the powder which has been lent to individuals and never repaid. RC ( Vi ); endorsed: “Govr. requiring X of all the Powder lent or delivered since the...
The Board agrees to give Capt. Groer a Guinea ⅌ Month for each person they shall put under him to be taught the duties and operations of a Laboratory, but if the number shall exceed four, no more than four Guineas a Month. Tr ( Vi ); quoted in Muter’s letter to Groar of this date entered in War Office Letter Book. Capt. Groar (whose name is variously spelled) has not been further identified,...
The last intelligence from the enemy having indicated that they were on the point of departure , and it being probable that not only the force from hence but a new embarkation is destined Southwardly Genl. Greene has recommended strongly the hastening on succours to the South. For this purpose Baron Steuben is left here. He entertains hopes of receiving more immediate support from your corps...
I received yesterday evening a Letter from General Nelson dated Rich neck november 22nd at half after five P.M. inclosing a note by which we learn that the vessels of the enemy were all under way except one which was getting under way, and the whole standing out for the Capes. This event tho’ relieving us in a certain degree by opening again the door of our commerce and also by putting it in...
Since writing the letter which accompanies this I have received a letter from Genl. Nelson dated Richneck. Nov. 22. 5. o’clock P.M. inclosing a note from New-port’s news point probably of the same day which gives information that the enemy’s vessels were then all under way except one which was also getting under way, and that the whole appeared to be standing out for the Capes. It is now...
As you have been so kind as to remain here, among other purposes, for that of organizing our troops meant to be forwarded to the south, I beg leave to inclose to you a resolution of the Executive of this State, entered into previous to your arrival here appropriating such of the men as were before unappropriated to any particular corps, and directing in what manner they shou’d be officered. I...
Since I had the honor of informing the General assembly of the instructions which had been given on the subject of the British Convention officers and their horses, Colo. Wood writes me that he has received a notification from Genl. Washington of the exchange of eighty eight of them, and that they are to proceed to Elizabeth town immediately where they will receive the General’s further...
The Officers were desired to give notice to the militia when arms were delivered them that no man would ever be discharged till he had returned his arms or given justifiable reasons for not doing it, and this was given out in general orders by the commanding officers. Nothing was said at that time about other stores, but I shall when the order for their discharge is given out, desire that...
Your Dragoon did not get here till last night. I this day submitted the matter as to the horses of the exchanged officers to the House of Delegates informing them that I had no doubt but Genl. Washington would take the proper measures as to those purchased since the Convention, but as an express was this day setting out with dispatches to him, I would mention the matter to him specially unless...
I have been honoured with your Excellency’s Letter of the 8th instant having found it impracticable to move suddenly the whole Convention troops, british and germans, and it being represented that there coud not immediately be covering provided for them all at fort Frederic k we concluded to march of the British first from whom was the principal danger of desertion and to permit the germans...
I received advice that on the 22d. inst. the enemy’s fleet got all under way and were standing towards the Capes. As it still remained undecided whether they would leave the bay or turn up it I waited the next stage of information that you might so far be enabled to judge of their destination. This I hourly expected; but it did not come till this evening when I am informed they all got to sea...
Brigadr. Genl. Lawson now waits on you for the purpose of informing you of the state of his corps. I would have done myself the pleasure of introducing him to you personally, but am engaged in the council chamber and shall be so till three o’clock. When yourself and Genl. Lawson shall have settled those essential wants without which his corps cannot proceed I shall be happy to do every thing...
The Enemy which lately invaded us left our Capes in the Night of the 22d Instant. What course they steered afterwards is not known. Another Fleet of Transports under the Command of Admiral Rodney fell down to the Hook on the 11th Instant. As this as well as the Fleet which lately left us is destined for Charles Town we shall March from their present Encampments all the forces who are so...
I have been honoured with your Excellency’s Letter of the 8th instant. Having found it impracticable to move suddenly the whole Convention Troops, british and germans, and it being represented that there coud not immediately be covering provided for them all at fort Frederic we concluded to march off the British first from whom was the principal danger of desertion and to permit the germans...
[ Richmond, 28? Nov. 1780. JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , Oct. 1780, 1827 edn., p. 31 (28 Nov.): “The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Governor, enclosing extracts of letters from Major Kirkpatrick and General Nelson, respecting certain persons who had aided and countenanced the enemy, which were...
I received your favor from Baltimore and shall carefully attend to the notifying you of the arrival of any fleet here from your nation or other circumstance which I may think interesting to you. The enemy have left us as you will before have heard. Tho’ I do not wish for new occasions of calling together my countrymen to try their valour, yet I really wish, as they were called together that...
In consequence of the resolutions of General Assembly at their last Session on the rank of the officers of the two State regiments, I wrote to the Continental board of war on that subject; an extract from my Letter is now inclosed. To this I have never received an answer. Brigadier General Muhlenberg has desired me to lay before the General Assembly the inclosed letter to him from Colo. Brent...
The letter which covers this being of a public nature I wished separately to acknolege the many things personally obliging to me expressed in your two letters . The very small amusements which it has been in my power to furnish in order to lighten some of your heavy hours by no means merited the acknolegements you make. Their impression must be ascribed to your extreme sensibility rather than...
[ Richmond, 30 Nov. 1780. Etienne Charavay, comp., Inventaire des autographes et documents historiques réunis par M. Benjamin Fillon , Paris, 1878, i , item 295, lists a letter signed by TJ of this date, 2 p. folio, and summarizes it as follows: “Il mande que le pouvoir exécutif a l’intention de placer, dans les principaux forts, quatre canons pour protéger les vaisseaux qui sont dans les...
I this moment received your letter, and have extended Mr. Elliot’s powers to the procuring subsistence for the marching troops. You will perceive by the inclosed resolution of assembly (which was put into my hands about two o’clock to-day) that they doubt whether the time, for which Genl. Lawson’s corps is enlisted, will not be so nearly expired before they reach the scene of action as, under...
I was equally surprized and mortified to learn by your letter of yesterday that mine of the day before had not been delivered. The resolution of assembly was put into my hands at two o’clock in the afternoon of Friday. At 7. o’clock I delivered letters to an express for yourself, Genl. Lawson , and Genl. Muhlenberg , with orders to be with you at farthest by an hour by sun on Saturday. I was...
I have been just honored with your favor of Yesterday expressing your Opinion that it will be for the general good to dispense with the services of the Corps under Genl. Lawson; and take the Liberty of putting under cover to you my Letter to General Lawson desiring him to give them a discharge. The Diversion of their Services to an object different from that to which they had attached their...
I beg leave to lay before the General Assembly the inclosed Letter from the honourable Theoderick Bland, one of our Delegates in Congress, the subjects of which may be proper for the consideration of the Legislative Body and have the honor to be with great respect sir, Your most obedient & most humble servant, RC ( Vi ); in a clerk’s hand, signed and addressed by TJ to Harrison as Speaker....
I have the pleasure of inclosing to you an order for the Shoes, Shirts and Cloth you desired. Mr. Armistead the Commissary of Stores to whom it is directed and who now waits on you, sais he has not that number of Shoes, but will call on the Continental Q.M. in hopes he may have some which are of course subject to your order. He has no white cloth but will if it be possible in our circumstances...
[ Richmond, 8? Dec. 1780. JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , Oct. 1780, 1827 edn., p. 41 (8 Dec.): “The Speaker laid before the House, a letter from the Governor, enclosing returns of the provisions obtained under the acts of the last session of Assembly; and the same were read, and ordered to lie on the table.”...
The inclosed is a Copy of a requisition I have received this morning from Lt. Colo. Lee. With respect to cloathing for so many of his Legion as were raised in other States and consequently not credited to us in our Continental quota we do not conceive the call on us to be proper; as it is totally unprecedented for the troops of one State to be clothed by another, nor does our condition or...
Baron Steuben has just favored me with a State of what is essential for your Corps. I am sincerely sorry it is in our power to comply with so little of it. I inclose you a warrant for £6000. which I fear however cannot be furnished till Thursday or Friday next, when any recruiting money due may be also paid. I shall be much obliged to you if you will be so good as to favor me with a return of...
At the request of Major General Baron de Steuben, I take the liberty of transmitting to you his Letter and observations on the cautions he thinks necessary to be observed on the raising future recruits. I think it my duty also to mention to the General Assembly that I have received information from him that a very considerable proportion of the new Levies raised under an act of the last...
Money to pay off the Men of the Brig will be ready Friday Evening or Saturday Morning which may be dispatched to them by Express. In the mean time they may be informed of this, and the Brig ordered to be in readiness to proceed down as within proposed Instructions should be given to the Officer commanding on the Cruise to make particular Enquiry whether any persons he may take come within the...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency on the subject of an expedition contemplated by this State against the british post at Detroit, and of receiving your answer of october 10th. since the date of my Letter the face of things has so far changed as to leave it no longer optional in us to attempt or to decline the expedition, but compels us to decide in the affirmative and to begin our...
Capt. Thomas is informed by letter from me this day that he may be supplied with money the next week to put the affairs of the Tanyard into a proper state. Colo. Muter will be pleased to prepare proper requisitions on Mr. Armistead for nail rods and tin. The resolution of assembly of June 1 . 80 seems to give an authority to the Executive which extends to the removal of a manager and making...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency on the subject of an expedition contemplated by this State against the british post at Detroit and of receiving your answer of october 10th. Since the date of my Letter the face of things has so far changed as to leave it no longer optional in us to attempt or to decline the expedition, but compels us to decide in the affirmative and to begin our...
[ 14 Dec. 1780. Epistolary Record: “Th: J. to Gl. Gates. merely friendly & private.” Not located. Probably this letter expressed TJ’s cordial feelings toward Gates at the time of the latter’s quitting his command in the South.]
I received your favour of the 7th instant from Annapolis and write an answer, tho I hardly know by what route to send it to you. The post at the barracks shall be duly attended to. I had a Letter from Colo. Taylor the other day when all was well and he mentions no apprehension of want. With respect to that part of the troops which are gone to Maryland we thought it right to lend all possible...
Translation (Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation). Jefferson’s original letter is probably not extant. This French version, translated and copied by a person or persons unknown, was in all likelihood sent from Philadelphia on 2 January 1781 by the Chevalier de La Luzerne in his letter to Chevalier Charles René D. S. Destouches, who commanded the French fleet at Newport, Rhode Island, after...
[ Richmond, 18? Dec. 1780. JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , Oct. 1780, 1827 edn., p. 55 (18 Dec.): “The Speaker laid before the House, a letter from the Governor, enclosing several others from Major General Baron Steuben, containing requisitions for the army, which were read, and ordered to be referred to the...
J’ai pris les informations nécessaires pour connoitre les rades d’ou les vaisseaux de guerre François qu’on stationneroit cet hiver dans notre Baye pourroient proteger le plus efficacement son commerce, etre le plus en sureté et avoir la meilleure retraite. Celles d’ Hampton et d’ York sont les seules qui commandent l’entrée de la Chesapeak; aucun vaisseau ne peut y pénétrer sans être vu de...
I have made the necessary enquiry as to the place where any armed vessels, which the minister of France shoud think proper to have wintered in our bay, might cover its trade, be safest, and have the most secure retreat. Hampton road and york town are the only ports from which a view of the entrance into the bay is commanded. No vessel can pass up it without being seen from either of these...
A requisition is made for a hhd. of spirits to be Sent to Chesterfield Ct. house, to be issued at the reduced prices, to the officers there. I have inclosed an order on the Commissary of Stores for a hhd., tho’ I am doubtfull it will not meet with your Excellency’s approbation, as I understand the pay in the new money was to take place the first of August last, and also I have heard, the...