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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Ticknor, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Ticknor, George"
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Your letter of the 6 th is recieved. mine of the 4 th 3 rd had gone on and will probably be in Boston as soon as you will. in addition to the letters then inclosed, I put another under your cover a day or two after, addressed to mr Say , author of the ablest work which has ever been written on Political Economy. I did not then know of the appointment of mr Gallatin
Availing myself of the kind offer of your aid in replacing some of the literary treasures which I furnished to Congress , I have made out a catalogue which I now inclose. it is confined principally to those books of which the edition adds sensibly to the value of the matter. this, as to translations, notes E t c other accompaniments, chiefly respects the classics: but size and type respect...
In my letter of July 4. I mentioned that mr Girard of Philadelphia would furnish a credit of 350.D. on his correspondents in Paris , then unknown to me, but of whom mr John Vaughan would give you information. I now inclose you a copy of mr Girard ’s letter to mess rs Perrigaux, Lafitte and co. directing them to pay to you that sum, and more if my catalogue should require more.— I can give you...
Your letter from London of June 18. was not recieved until the 3 d of Oct. in the mean time I had written you mine of July 4. & Aug. 16 the former conveyed my formidable catalogue of the books desired, and informed you that mr Girard would give an order on his correspondent at Paris to hold 350.D. subject to your call; & the latter inclosed a copy of his letter to mess rs Perrigaux, La fitte &...
I wrote you a long letter on the 14 th inst. and as it went by duplicates thro good channels, I am sure you will get it. but a gentleman going from hence to Paris direct, which he will probably reach before either of the other channels of conveyance I will repeat from that letter but a single article, the request to add to the catalogue I formerly troubled you with, the underwritten books....
I had written you on the 14 th of Jan. by duplicates through your father and the Secretary of state , when a mr Terril , a young friend and relation of mine visited us, on his way, viâ Paris to Geneva for his education. this direct conveyance tempted me to write you a short letter by him on the 31 st . he left us two days ago, & yesterday I recieved your favor of Nov. 25.
My last to you was of Feb. 8. 16. since which I have recieved yours of Mar. 15. Apr. 23. & July 10. 16. in this last you mentioned that you should be in Paris this spring, till which time therefore I have deferred acknoleging them; and also because winter passages for letters to Europe are rare, slow, and uncertain. The German editions of Homer, Virgil, Juvenal, Aeschylus and Tacitus, which...
Your favor of Aug. 14. was delivered to me as I was setting out for the distant possession, from which I now write, & to which I pay frequent & long visits. on my arrival here I make it my first duty to write the letter you request to mr Erving , and to inclose it in this under cover to your father, that you may get it in time. my letters are always letters of thanks because you are always...
I recieved, two days ago, your favor of Aug. 10. from Madrid , an d sincerely regret that my letter to Cardinal Dugnani did not reach you at Rome . it would have introduced you to a circle worth studying as a variety in the human character. I am happy however to learn that your peregrinations through Europe have been succesful as to the object to which they were directed. you will come home...
Repeated and severe attacks of illness during the last 15. or 16. months have kept me unable to attend even to necessary business and equally so to maintain a correspondence with my friends. I would not otherwise have been so tardy in congratulating you on your safe return to your family and country, and in acknoleging your letters from Madrid and from sea . and indeed I have, in some degree,...
Your letter of the 1 st instant came to hand on the 12 th and came with cordial welcome, as does every thing from you. it’s subject made it the more so, as one which I had long had in mind. and which, when the tariff was last before congress, I had made an effort to effect thro’ the delegates of our state, and by letters to the Secretary of the Treasury. I coupled with it an endeavour to...
I write this from an occasional residence very distant from Monticello. it will be handed you by mr Jesse B. Harrison, and mr William Beverley Towles, two young gentlemen of this neighborhood who are going on to Cambridge to finish there the education begun here. with them I am not personally acquainted, but much so with their fathers, residents here, and worthy of entire respect. they assure...
I have written a letter to you of this date & from this place which will be handed you by mr Harrison & mr Towles two youths of this vicinity who go on to your Univ ty to finish their educn. what I say in that letter is truth, but an addnal truth which could not be put into an open letter, it is my duty to add for your own inspection only & to forward it by mail. mr Harrison the father has...
I recieved in due time your favor of Jun 16. and with it your Syllabus of lectures on Spanish literature. I have considered this with great interest & satisfn, as it gives me a model of the course I wish to see pursued in the diff t branches of instruction in our University. i.e a methodical, critical & profound explanation by way of protection of every science we propose to teach: I am not...
Your favor fo July 26. has been recieved, and with it the prospectus of the Northampton school. this will certainly prove a great blessing to the individuals who can obtain access to it. the only ground of regret is the small extent of it’s scale, in the few who can share it’s advantages it will lay a solid foundn of virtue as well of learning. but leaving it at the age of 13. they will still...
Gen l La Fayette was here when I rec d your favor of Oct. 26. I communicated to him the respectful mention made of him in your letter which he rec d with very kind expressions towds yourself. the professional occupns which prevented the meeting here which he had proposed to you he considered as a suff t justfn. to us it will give the pleasure of prolonged enjoyment and a more quiet one also in...
I give you many thanks for your German catalogue, which is exactly such as I wished, that is to say, a collection only of their best books. Our Univ ty opened under considerable discoragemts. the nonarrival of 3. of our Professors prevented our open g on the 1 st of Feby as we had announced, and the belief the that they were lost from the length of time since their embaren occasioned many who...