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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Oldham, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Oldham, James"
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I recieved last night your letter of the 26th. I am afraid from the account you give of the sheet iron there will not be enough to finish. however let it be put on the part where long sheets are wanting, so that whatever supply may be necessary may be of common sheet iron, and let me know as soon as done, how much will be wanting. I am in hopes you have recieved the screws. mr Stewart set out...
I recieved last night your letter of the day before, and now inclose you the 20. Dollars desired. I ordered from Philadelphia the three sheets of sheet iron which you supposed might be wanting. they are now on their way. if not wanting to finish the terras, they may be employed on the gutturs which are to be laid with sheet iron. they should be painted on both sides before they are laid down....
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly salutations to Cap t Oldham and asks the favor of him to select for him 4. good mortise doorlocks, of brass & plain for doors 1 ⅜ & 1 16 thick, that is to say 1 ½ I. wanting 1 16 mr Gibson will be so kind as usual to pay for them, and the bearer mr Gilmore
On the 26th. inst. there were shipped from Philadelphia 2 boxes of sheet iron for the terras, bent & painted ready to be laid. these contain 39. sheets only. for the terras it will take 96. sheets in the whole and 20. do. for the 8. gutturs of the porticos & piazzas  3. do. for the gutturs where the roof joins the walls of the dome room 119 in the whole. so that about a third only of the whole...
I recieved yesterday your letter, of the 11th. and observe you are fitting up a Corinthian room for mr Gallego. I am glad to learn it, because a single example of chaste architecture may guide the taste of the city and especially when they find that that system of architecture which has now been the delight of the world for three thousand years costs no more than the barbarous & tawdry fancies...
I recieved yesterday, during the session of the Visitors of the University, and laid before them, your two Memorials addressed to them, the one on your participation in the future work to be done on the Rotunda, and the second on the difference between yourself & the Proctor in the settlement of your accounts. As to the first their answer is the fact that they do not propose that any further...
Yours of the 3d. was recieved last night. would not riven pine slabs make a better moveable cover for the plaistered part of the house, than linen? if slabs 10. f. long and 2. f. apart were first laid cross ways thus horizontally and then others nailed up & down close, & breaking joints and the nails clinched on the under side, it would hang together strongly, and might be laid on, & laid by...
Business prevented my answering your letter of Oct. 21. till I apprehended you had left Albemarle for Richmond. Your draughts on me for the work you have done, or may do, or the materials shall be always paid at the counting house of messrs. Gibson & Jefferson in Richmond. if you can draw at 30. days sight it will be a convenience because I settle every thing of that kind once a month, but if...
I inclose you mr Andrews’ reciept for 174D.18c paid him on your account. mr Poype having obtained from mr Montgolfier the inventor of the Hydraulic ram permission to use his patent right to the advantage of mr Poype who has need of it, I do not think myself at liberty to make any communication of it’s construction to his prejudice. on the same ground I have not put to use yet the one he...
The terms offered by James Oldham are accepted for the Pavilion N o I. with an allowance to him of the Philadelphia printed prices without any discount Pavilion N o I. is 44. f front & 48.f. flank the interval between N. II. & I is 54.f. from wall to wall. ViHi : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have duly recieved your’s of the 7th. and am sorry for your disappointment at Richmond. at this place what little private building is going on is engaged, and the public (wooden part) will wait for funds till next spring. the work which I could put into your hands at once, is 12. a pair folding doors, mahogany, for partition between the Hall & Parlour, 7:} 2. pair Mahogany sashes (lights 12....
Being in immediate want of some glass to keep the winter out of our broken windows, I must trespass on your friendship, as being a judge of the quality to look out for the following sizes, to wit. 50. panes 12 I. square 20. panes 12. by 18 I. 3. panes 24. by 18 I. mr Gibson will be so good as to pay the bill, and if you will have the box lodged with him, I will direct a boatman to call for it...
I inclose you the copy of a resolution of the Visitors of the University of Virga entered into at their late meeting and also a copy of the letter to mr Griffin which is the subject of it, the original being deposit d with the papers of the board in my possession and open to your inspection, if desired. you will observe that the first duty enjoined on me by the resoln is to ask of you whether...
It is now become very material that the whole of my doors should be finished & got to Monticello as speedily as possible, as my painter will otherwise have left me. he is a most capibal hand, and should he not paint them, it may be years before I have another opportunity. Capt. Andrews is gone to New York, he told me before he went away that he was desired to leave some money for you in my...