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Printed text ( Boyd, Papers of Jefferson Julian P. Boyd et al ., eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (16 vols. to date; Princeton, N.J., 1950——). , III, 506–7). With my letter to the President I inclose a copy of the bill for calling in the paper money now in circulation, being the only copy I have been able to get. in my letter to the delegates I ask the favor of them to furnish me with...
MS ( LC : Jefferson Papers). A second page, which Jefferson used as the cover of this letter, is addressed to “The honourable James Madison Philadelphia favoured by Mr. Short.” Note 2, below, explains why this letter was never received. I beg leave to introduce to your acquaintance the bearer mr. Short who comes to Philadelphia in hopes of being able to prosecute in greater quiet there than he...
Draft ( LC : Jefferson Papers). I have recd from you two several favours on the subject of the designs against the territorial rights of Virginia. I never before could comprehend on what principle our right to the Western country could be denied which would not at the same time subvert the rights of all the states to the whole of their territory. what objections may be founded on the Charter...
Draft ( LC : Jefferson Papers). Unsigned but in Jefferson’s hand. Addressed by him to “Hon. James Madison at Congress.” Your favour by Colo Basset is not yet come to hand. the intimation through the Attorney I received the day before Colo. Bland’s arrival by whom I am honoured with your’s of the 14th. inst. it finds me at this place attending my family under inoculation. this will of course...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Jany. 31, 1783,” and further docketed, in an unknown hand, “Ths. Jefferson 31. Jan. 1783.” The italicized words are those written by Jefferson in cipher. The present letter makes clear that Jefferson, before leaving Philadelphia for Baltimore, had “concerted” with JM in preparing a code for the greater security of confidential portions of their...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Feby. 7. 1783,” and further docketed in an unknown hand, “Ths. Jefferson 7. Feb. 1783.” The italicized words are those written by Jefferson in cipher and decoded interlinearly by JM. For the nature of the cipher, see Jefferson to JM, 31 Jan. 1783 , ed. n. I write by this post to the Minister of foreign affairs, but will repeat to you the facts...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Undocketed and cover missing, but undoubtedly written to JM. Patsy putting the inclosed into my hands, obliges me to make a separate letter of it, that while I give it the protection of your address I may yet pay it’s postage. I suspect by the superscription (which I saw before Majr Franks amended it) and by what I know of Patsy’s hierogliphical writing that miss...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). At the bottom of the first of four pages Jefferson wrote “Honble James Madison.” Docketed by JM, “Ths. Jefferson. 14 Feb. 1783.” Also on the docket appears, in an unknown hand, “See passage relating to Mr. Adams.” The words italicized are those written by Jefferson in the cipher described in Jefferson to JM, 31 Jan. 1783 , ed. n. Unless otherwise noted, the decoding...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Tho. Jefferson Apl. 14. 1783.” Alongside this docket JM also wrote “April.” Using a new cipher which JM and Jefferson evidently had devised while they were together in Philadelphia, Jefferson encoded the words which are here italicized. This cipher will be designated hereafter as “JM-Jefferson Code No. 2.” Meeting at our quarters with a mr. Levi...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Jefferson’s hand. Docketed by JM, “From Ths. J. to J.M. May 7, 1783.” On the docket page someone unknown wrote, “Ths. Jefferson May 7. 1783.” Using the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2, Jefferson enciphered the words which are here italicized. Interlineated on the manuscript is JM’s decoding of these ciphers. Filed with the manuscript are two pages entitled by...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). JM docketed the letter, “June 1. 1783,” and probably at a later date, “Tho. Jefferson 1. June 1783.” The receipt of your letter of May 6. remains unacknoleged. I am also told that Colo Monroe has letters for me by post tho’ I have not yet received them. I hear but little from our assembly. mr. Henry has declared in favour of the impost. this will ensure it. how he is...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Ths. Jefferson 17 June. 1783,” also “June 17. 1783. ideas of Constitution.” Many years later William Cabell Rives, author of a detailed biography of Madison’s career to 1797, as well as an editor of his papers, added to the docket, “Mr. Henry’s course as to the Impost Act.” Your favours of the 13th. & 20th. Ult. came to hand about a week ago. I am...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “The Honble James Madison of the Virginia delegation in Congress.” Docketed by JM, “August 31. 1783.” Another hand wrote “Mr. Jefferson” below that date and, to the right of it, “Th. Jefferson Augst 31. 1783.” Under this second dating, William Cabell Rives, the first major biographer of Madison, wrote, probably late in the 1850’s, “our allusions in this...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover addressed to “James Madison junr. esq. Orange. to the care of mr Jas. Maury Fredericksburg.” Docketed by JM, “Ths. Jefferson Dec 11. 1783.” Your determination to avail yourself of the fine weather proved I fear a very unfortunate one. I pitied your probable situation in the tempestuous season which immediately succeeded your departure. it is now above a...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. Docketed by JM, “Thos. Jefferson Jan 1 1784.” Beneath the docket appears in an unknown hand, “Buffons theory respecting the Globe.” Your favour of the 10th. Dec. came to hand about a fortnight after its date. It has occasioned me to reflect a little more attentively on Buffon’s central heat than I did in the moment of our conversation and to form an...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Jefferson’s hand. Docketed by JM, “Thos. Jefferson. Feb 20th. 1784.” The italicized words are those written in the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2. Your favour of the 11th. inst. came to hand this day. I had prepared a multitude of mem[orandu]ms of subjects whereon to write you, but I will first answer those arising from your letter. by the time my order got...
I received yesterday by mr. Maury your favor of Feb. 17. That which you mention to have written by post a few days before is not yet come to hand. I am induced to this quick reply to the former by an alarming paragraph in it, which is that Mazzei is coming to Annapolis. I tremble at the idea. I know he will be worse to me than a return of my double quotidian head-ach. There is a resolution...
My last to you was of the 16th. of March, as was the latest I have received from you. By the proposition to bound our country to the Westward, I meant no more than the passing an act declaring that that should be our boundary from the moment the people of the Western country & Congress should agree to it. The act of Congress now inclosed to you will shew you that they have agreed to it,...
The inclosed resolutions on the subject of commerce are the only things of consequence passed since my last. You will be surprised to receive another pair of spectacles. The paper with them will explain the error. If you can dispose of the supernumerary pair do so, & I will remit the money to Dudley: if you cannot, return them by the next post & I will return them to him. Congress is now on...
I will now take up the several enquiries contained in your letter of Apr. 25. which came to hand yesterday. ‘Will it not be good policy to suspend further treaties of commerce till measures shall have taken place in America, which may correct the idea in Europe of impotency in the federal government in matters of commerce?’ Congress think such measures requisite, and have accordingly...
Your favors of the 8th. & 15th. came to hand yesterday. I have this morning revised your former letters to see what commissions it would be best for me to execute here for you. In that of Feb. 17, you desire a recommendation of a fit bookseller in Paris & London. This certainly I can better do from the spot. In the mean time address yourself to me as your bookseller for either place, because...
Letter not found. ca. 1 June 1784 . In his “Summary Journal of letters,” Jefferson wrote under June, “Jas. Madison. Inclosed Deane’s letters.” In New York on 31 May, Jefferson noted in his account book a payment to James Rivington “for paper and books £3.4” ( Boyd, Papers of Jefferson Julian P. Boyd et al., eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (18 vols. to date; Princeton, N. J., 1950——). ,...
After visiting the principal towns through Connecticut, Rhode-island, this state & N. Hampshire in order to acquire what knowlege I could of their commerce & other circumstances I am returned to this place & shall sail the day after tomorrow in the Ceres bound for London: but my purpose is to get on shore in some boat on the coast of France & proceed directly to Paris. My servant being to set...
Your letters of Aug. 20. Sep 7. & 15. I received by the last packet. That by mr Short is not yet arrived. His delay is unaccountable. I was pleased to find by the public papers (for as yet I have no other information of it) that the assembly had restrained their foreign trade to four places: I should have been more pleased had it been to one. However I trust that York & Hobbs’ hole will do so...
In mine of Nov. 11. I acknoleged the receipt of yours of Aug. 20. Sep. 7. & 15. Since that, the one of Oct. 11. by the packet has come to hand as also that of July 3. by mr Short who came in the packet, was actually in N. York when you passed through it & had waited there several days in hopes of seeing you. I thank you very much for the relation of the proceedings of assembly. It is the most...
My last to you was dated Dec. 8. since that yours of Feb. 1. has come to hand; and I am in hopes I shall shortly receive from you the history of the last session of our assembly. I will pray you always to send your letters by the French packet which sails from N. York the 15th. of every month. I had made Neill Jamieson my post master general there, who will always take care of my letters and...
Your favor of Jan. 9. came to my hands on the 13th. of April. The very full and satisfactory detail of the proceedings of assembly which it contained, gave me the highest pleasure. The value of these communications cannot be calculated at a shorter distance than the breadth of the Atlantic. Having lately made a cypher on a more convenient plan than the one we have used, I now transmit it to...
My last to you was dated May 11. by Monsr. de Doradour. Since that I have received yours of Jan. 22. with 6. copies of the revisal, and that of Apr. 27. by mr Mazzei. All is quiet here. The Emperor & Dutch are certainly agreed tho’ they have not published their agreement. Most of his schemes in Germany must be postponed, if they are not prevented, by the confederacy of many of the Germanic...
By mr Fitzhugh you will receive my letter of the 1’st inst. He is still here, & gives me an opportunity of again addressing you much sooner than I should have done but for the discovery of a great peice of inattention. In that letter I send you a detail of the cost of your books, and desire you to keep the amount in your hands, as if I had forgot, that a part of it was in fact your own, as...
Seven o’clock, and retired to my fireside, I have determined to enter into conversation with you; this is a village of about 5000 inhabitants, when the court is not here and 20,000 when they are, occupying a valley thro’ which runs a brook, and on each side of it a ridge of small mountains most of which are naked rock. The king comes here, in the fall always, to hunt. His court attend him, as...
My last letters have been of the 1st. & 20th. of Sep. and the 28th. of Oct. yours unacknoleged, are of Aug. 20. Oct. 3. & Nov. 15. I take this the first safe opportunity of inclosing you the bills of lading for your books, & two others for your name sake of Williamsburgh & for the attorney which I will pray you to forward. I thank you for the communication of the remonstrance against the...
In my letter of yesterday I forgot to inclose one I have received on the subject of a debt due to mr Paradise, and I wish the present letter may reach the bearer of that in time to go by the same conveiance. The inclosed from Doctor Bancroft will explain itself. I add my solicitations to his, not to ask any thing to be done for mr Paradise inconsistent with the justice due to others, but that...
Some of the objects of the joint commissions with which we were honoured by Congress called me to this place about six weeks ago. Tomorrow I set out on my return to Paris. With this nation nothing is done; and it is now decided that they intend to do nothing with us. The king is against a change of measures; his ministers are against it, some from principle, others from attachment to their...
After a very long silence, I am at length able to write to you. An unlucky dislocation of my right wrist has disabled me from using my pen for three months. I now begin to use it a little, but with great pain; so that this letter must be taken up at such intervals as the state of my hand will permit, & will probably be the work of some days. Tho’ the joint seems to be well set, the swelling...
My last to you was of the 16th. of Dec. since which I have received yours of Nov. 25. & Dec. 4. which afforded me, as your letters always do, a treat on matters public, individual & oeconomical. I am impatient to learn your sentiments on the late troubles in the Eastern states. So far as I have yet seen, they do not appear to threaten serious consequences. Those states have suffered by the...
I leave the inclosed open for your perusal & that of your Collegues & others to whom you may chuse to shew it; only taking care that neither copies nor extracts be taken. Be so good, when you are done with it, as to stick a wafer in it and forward it to the Governor. I am with sincere esteem Dr. Sir Your friend & servt P. S. I do not know whether you are acquainted with young Bannister who...
I wrote you last on the 30th. of Jan. with a postscript of Feb. 5. Having set out the last day of that month to try the waters of Aix, and been journeying since till the 10th. inst. I have been unable to continue my correspondence with you. In the mean time I have received your several favors of Feb. 15. Mar. 18. 19. & Apr. 23. The last arrived here about the 25th. of May, while those of Mar....
My last was of June 20. Your’s received since that date are May 15. and June 6. In mine I acknoleged the receipt of the Paccan nuts which came sealed up. I have reason to believe those in the box are arrived at Lorient. By the Mary capt Howland lately sailed from Havre to N. York I shipped three boxes of books one marked I.M. for yourself, one marked B.F. for Doctr. Franklin, & one marked W.H....
A gentleman going from hence by Lorient to Boston furnishes me an opportunity of recommending to your care the inclosed letters which I could not get ready for the last packet. Pray inform me in your next whether letters directed to your foreign ministers or franked by them are free of postage. That they ought to be so, is acknoleged substantially by the resolution of Congress allowing us to...
My last to you were of Aug. 2. & 15. Since that I have sent to Havre to be forwarded to you by the present packet 3. boxes marked I.M. G.W. and A.D. The two last are for mr. Wythe in Williamsburgh, and mr. Alexr. Donald merchant in Richmond. The first contains the books for yourself which shall be noted at the close of my letter, together with the following for mr. Rittenhouse; viz. la Chymie...
The bearer hereof the count de Moustier, successor to Monsr. de la Luzerne, would from his office need no letter of introduction to you or to any body. Yet I take the liberty of recommending him to you to shorten those formal approaches which the same office would otherwise expose him to in making your acquaintance. He is a great enemy to formality, etiquette, ostentation & luxury. He goes...
My last to you was of Oct. 8. by the Count de Moustier. Yours of July 18. Sep. 6. & Oct. 24. have been successively received, yesterday, the day before & three or four days before that. I have only had time to read the letters, the printed papers communicated with them, however interesting, being obliged to lie over till I finish my dispatches for the packet, which dispatches must go from...
I wrote you last on the 20th. of December since which your’s of the same day and of the 9th. have come to hand. The apples & cranberries you were so kind as to send at the same time were all spoiled when they arrived at Havre, so that probably those articles will not keep during the passage. The box of plants is arrived at the Custom house here, but I shall probably not receive them till after...
The bearer of this letter is mr. Francis Adrian Van der Kemp one of the late victims of patriotism in Holland. Having determined to remove himself & his family to America, his friend the Baron de Capellen, another of those expatriated worthies, has asked of me to give letters of introduction to Mr. Van der Kemp, recommending him for his extraordinary zeal in the cause of liberty, his talents,...
The bearer hereof, Monsieur de Warville, is already known to you by his writings, some of which I have heretofore sent you, & particularly his work sur la France et les etats unis. I am happy to be able to present him to you in person, assured that you will find him in all his dispositions equally estimable as for his genius. I nee[d] only to ask your acquaintance for him. That will dispo[se]...
Mine of Feb. 6. acknoleged the receipt of yours of Dec. 9. and 20. Since that, those of Feb. 19. & 20. are come to hand. The present will be delivered you by mr. Warville, whom you will find truly estimable, & a great enthusiast for liberty. His writings will have shewn you this. For public news I must refer you to my letter to mr. Jay. Those I wrote to him from Amsterdam will have informed...
The inclosed letter for mr. Jay being of a private nature, I have thought it better to put it under your cover lest it might be opened by some of his clerks in the case of his absence. But I inclose a press copy of it for yourself, as you will perceive the subject of it referred to you as well as to him. I ask your aid in it so far as you think right, and to have done what you think right. If...
My last letters to you were of the 3d & 25. of May. Yours from Orange, of Apr. 22. came to hand on the 10th. inst. My letter to mr. Jay containing all the public news that is well authenticated, I will not repeat it here, but add some details in the smaller way which you may be glad to know. The disgrace of the Marquis de la Fayette which at any other period of their history would have had the...
The bearer hereof, mr. Dobbyns, a native of Ireland, having it in contemplation to dispose of his estate in that country, & to remove with his tenants to America, I have advised him, before he carries the measure into entire execution, to go thither himself, to fix on the part of the country which from climate, soil, & other circumstances would best suit his views, and even to provide a place...
My last to you was of the 31st. of July: since which I have received yours of July 24. Aug. 10. & 23. The first part of this long silence in me was occasioned by a knoledge that you were absent from N. York; the latter part, by a want of opportunity, which has been longer than usual: mr. Shippen being just arrived here, and to set out tomorrow for London, I avail myself of that channel of...