You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
Results 201-250 of 1,185 sorted by recipient
Yours of the 17th is recieved. I concur in your ideas that the request from the Bey of Tunis of a frigate of 36. guns should be complaisantly refused. I think the greatest dispatch should be used in sending either the guncarriages or money to Simpson for the emperor of Marocco, and the stores to Algiers; &, if you approve it, the powder on account : or perhaps it would be better to authorise...
I send you the sequel of Gilmer’s letters rec d since my last to you. Torrey you will see does not accept. I had before rec d from the Sec y at War the inclosed letter to him from mr Emmet the father recommending his son Doct r John Patton Emmet, for Professor of Chemistry. considering that branch as expected by Doct r Dunglison I have given an answer that the place was filled. but learning...
Will you be so good as to consult with the other members of the administration on the allowance to be made to Govr. Claiborne? There are several elements of consideration to be attended to, towit, as to his character 1. as Governor of Missisipi. 2. Commissioner for the receipt of Louisiana. 3. as Governor of Louisiana: as to the funds from which his compensation is to be taken, to wit 1. the...
My last to you was of the 31st. of July: since which I have received yours of July 24. Aug. 10. and 23. The first part of this long silence in me was occasioned by a knoledge that you were absent from N. York; the latter part, by a want of opportunity, which has been longer than usual: Mr. Shippen being just arrived here, and to set out tomorrow for London, I avail myself of that channel of...
Your favor of the 6 th was duly recieved. the double treachery of Henry will do lasting good both here & in England . it prostrates the party here, and will prove to the people of England , beyond the power of palliation by the ministry, that the war is caused by the wrongs of their own nation. The case of the Batture not having been explained by a trial at bar as had been expected, I have...
Yours of the 10th. inst. is recieved. I expected mine of the 14th. would have been my last from hence, as I had proposed to have set out on the 20th. But in the morning of the 19th. we heard of the arrival of Marshall at New York, and I concluded to stay & see whether that circumstance would produce any new projects. No doubt he there recieved more than hints from Hamilton as to the tone...
No. 6. Since my last of June 29. I have received your Nos. 2. & 3. of June 24. & 25. The following particulars occur. Vining has declined offering at the next election. It is said we are to have in his room a mr. Roach, formerly of the army, an anti-cincinnatus, and good agricultural man. Smith of S. C. declines also. He has bought a fine house in Charleston for 5000. £ and had determined not...
I had intended to have been with you before this, but my daughter , who wishes to pay her respects to mrs Madison & yourself at the same time, has been confined by the illness of her youngest child . he has been mending for some days, but slowly, & from the nature of his complaint (visceral) it will be some days yet before she can leave him. I think therefore, on the departure of our present...
The President of the United States of America, To James Madison Esqr. of Orange County, in the State of Virginia, Greeting. You are hereby commanded to appear before the Judges of the Court of the United States for the 2nd. Circuit at the City of Hartford in the District of Connecticut, within Said circuit on the Seventeenth day of September, next to testify, and the truth, to Say on behalf of...
I inclose you the S. Carolina ratification of the amendment to the constitution, & presume it possible that in a week more you may recieve that of Tennisee, after which I suppose no time should be lost in publishing officially the final ratification. Prevost accepts the office of judge of the Orleans territory, & Dickerson that of Attorney. but as J.T.M. declines the place of A.G. US. can we...
The inclosed lre in Gr. Lat. Fr. and Eng. with it’s accompaniments being intended for your inspection as much as mine, is now forwarded for your perusal. you will be so good as to reinclose them that I may return them to the writer. the answer I propose to give is, what I have given on all similar applications, that until the debt of the University is discharged, and it’s funds liberated, the...
Your favor of Feb. 15. is duly recieved and I now inclose the letter for Mr. Christie, which you will be so kind as to deliver to him open or sealed as you think best, and apologize to him for my availing myself of the opportunity of getting the vetch from England which you say is not to be had in Philadelphia. The universal culture of this plant in Europe establishes it’s value in a farm, and...
Commissions to be made out. Thomas Rodney of Delaware to be judge of Missipi. vice S. Lewis Thomas Rodney of Delaware. } to be Commrs. &c West of Pearl river. Robert Williams of N. Carolina Ephraim Kerby of Connecticut } to be Commrs. &c East of Pearl river. Robert Carter Nicholas of Kentucky A blank commission for the Register East of Pearl river. Tenche Coxe of Pensylvania to be Purveyor....
25 September 1804, Monticello. “I intended to have been with you tomorrow evening, but it is rendered now improbable, partly by the weather, but more by the arrival of M. & Made. Yrujo last night. They are now here, and go back from hence to Washington. If they leave us tomorrow I shall be with you the next day. He has opened his budget which we have smoothed off. It must be the subject of...
I wrote you last on the 21st. Your’s of the 12th. therein acknoleged is the last recd. The measure I suggested in mine of adjourning for consultation with their constituents was not brought forward; but on Tuesday 3. resolutions were moved which you will see in the public papers. They were offered in committee to prevent their being suppressed by the previous question, & in the commee. on the...
Doctr. Rose delivered me last night the letter with which you charged him, and I have thought it better to attend to it’s contents at once before the arrival of the load of other business which this morning’s post will bring. Pinckney’s, Orr’s, Livermore’s, Howell’s, Webster’s, Murray’s, Otis’s, Graham’s & Thornton’s letters, with Wagner’s sketch of an answer to the latter are all returned...
So much of the communications from our envoys has got abroad, & so partially that there can now be no ground for reconsideration with the Senate. I may therefore consistently with duty do what every member of the body is doing. Still I would rather you would use the communication with reserve till you see the whole papers. The first impressions from them are very disagreeable & confused....
I inclose you two letters from mr Burrall , postmaster of Baltimore . you will percieve by them that the removal of mr Granger has spread some dismay in the ranks. I lodged in the same house with him (Francis’s) during the sessions of Congress of 97. 98. 99. we breakfasted, dined E t c at the same table. he classed himself with the federalists, but I did not know why, for he scarcely ever...
I presume the correspondence between the Ambassador of Tunis & Secretary of State, must be considd as exhibiting the only causes of difference, & that that correspondence alone need be sent to the Senate. want of time for copies must authorize sending the originals, to be returned DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
I return you mr Coxe’s letter which has cost me much time at two or three different attempts to decypher it. had I such a correspondent I should certainly admonish him that if he would not so far respect my time as to write to me legibly, I should so far respect it myself as not to waste it in decomposing and recomposing his hieroglyphics. The jarrings between the friends of Hamilton and...
I inclose you a letter & sundry papers recieved from Mr. Gallatin of which I will ask the return. 1. As to the refractory Tunisians I think we should pay their passage & get rid of them. If they would stipulate to deliver themselves to any Tunisian or other Barbary Agent in England, it would excuse us to the Bey of Tunis. The case of an American citizen impressed on board the Chichester, &...
Circular Notwithstanding the reduction which was made in the rents proposed, it appears that that on the salaries will so much enlarge our surplus, that we may very safely engage 8. professors, and still have a surplus this year of 6000. D. and annually after of 5024 D. The opportunity of procuring the anatomical professor is so advantageous, that I propose to make the provisional instruction...
My last to you was of the 16th. since which yours of the 12th. is recieved and it’s contents disposed of properly. these met such approbation as to have occasioned an extraordinary impression of that day’s paper. Logan’s bill is passed. the lower house, by a majority of 20. passed yesterday a bill continuing the suspension of intercourse with France, with a new clause enabling the President to...
Th: Jefferson presents his friendly respects to Mr. Madison and asks the favor of him to procure a safe conveyance for the inclosed letter to Colo. Monroe, which is of great importance public and private, as covering papers of consequence. PrC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Enclosure: TJ to Monroe, 21 Mch. 1796 , and enclosures.
Unexpected delays in getting my carriage ready will render it impossible for me to leave this till Thursday or Friday, probably Friday: and as you will be gone or going by that time, and we shall meet so soon at Washington, I shall not have the pleasure of seeing you at your own house, but get on as far as the day will let me. mr Gallatin left N. York on the 21st. and expected to be at...
Yours of the 12th. inst. is received, and I will duly attend to your commission relative to the ploughs. We have had such constant deluges of rain and bad weather for some time past that I have not yet been able to go to Dr. Logan’s to make the enquiries you desire, but I will do it soon. We expect Mr. Genest here within a few days. It seems as if his arrival would furnish occasion for the...
My last to you were of Aug. 2. and 15. Since that I have sent to Havre to be forwarded to you by the present packet 3. boxes marked I.M. G.W. and A.D. The two last are for Mr. Wythe in Williamsburgh, and Mr. Alexr. Donald merchant in Richmond. The first contains the books for yourself which shall be noted at the close of my letter, together with the following for Mr. Rittenhouse; viz. la...
I presume the two commissions of militia officers in the District of Columbia which you inclosed yesterday, were meant as resignations. I have sent them as such to the War office. I was misinformed as to the name of the person appointed Secretary of Orleans. altho always called Bolling Robertson it seems his name is Thomas Bolling Robertson. will you be so good as to order a new commission, &...
In the line I scribbled to you from Georgetown to-day I omitted to inform you that I had unfortunately dropped your letter with some papers of my own in the road between Mount Vernon & Alexandria. Proper measures are taken to recover them. I have reflected on Govr. Lee’s plan of opposing the Federal bank by setting up a state one, and find it not only inadequate, but objectionable highly, &...
Considering Ch r Tucker’s acceptance as absolutely desperate, the reasons he assigned being of an immoveable character, and the hopeless state in which we should be if Barber also declined I took advge of his being at our court to ask him to call on me. he did so. I entered with him on the subject of his undertaking our chair of Law . he stiffly maintained at first the preference of his...
Your’s of July 22. came to hand on the 25th. the day of my arrival here. I think the proposition to tender another 30,000. D. to Algiers a very judicious one, and have therefore written to mr Gallatin to take measures in conjunction with yourself to make the remittance by the General Greene. I have not yet written to the emperor of Marocco; because when one has nothing to write about it is...
Your’s of the 3d. came to hand yesterday. I am content that the questions relative to Commissioners of bankruptcy and dockets should remain until we meet: altho’ I think there are reasons of weight for not leaving the latter for Congress to do, for that would be abandoning it. the repeal of that law has been unquestionably pleasing to the people generally; and having led Congress to it, we owe...
The idea seems to gain credit that the naval powers combining against France will prohibit supplies even of provisions to that country. Should this be formally notified I should suppose Congress would be called, because it is a justifiable cause of war, & as the Executive cannot decide the question of war on the affirmative side, neither ought it to do so on the negative side, by preventing...
I wrote you on the 23d. and yesterday I received yours of the 17th. which was the more welcome as it acknoleged mine of the 9th. about the safety of which I was anxious. I now risk some other papers, the sequel of those conveyed in that. The result I know not. We are sending a courier to Madrid to make a last effort for the preservation of honorable peace. The affairs of France are recovering...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. A detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr. Watson being sick, only Genl. Cocke, mr. Cabell and myself met. Altho’ not a...
I wrote yesterday to Genl. Dearborne on the subject of intruders on the public lands in Louisiana, inclosing a note to each of the heads of department asking them to give me their opinions thereon separately. I did this by way of beginning the practice of separate consultation, which a host of considerations satisfy me is a very salutary & useful one to be resorted to occasionally. the...
The person who hands you this letter is an interesting subject of curiosity. he was taken prisoner by the Kickapoos when he supposes he must have been about 3. or 4. years of age, knows not whence taken, nor who were his parents. he escaped from the Indians at about 19. as he supposes, & about 7. years ago. he has applied himself to education, is a student of Medecine, & has assumed the name...
I return your letter to the President, and that of mr. Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. The matters which mr. Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. But that about the navigation of the St. Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. The navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
The inclosed letter for Mr. Jay being of a private nature, I have thought it better to put it under your cover lest it might be opened by some of his clerks in the case of his absence. But I inclose a press copy of it for yourself, as you will perceive the subject of it referred to you as well as to him. I ask your aid in it so far as you think right, and to have done what you think right. If...
I return you all your papers except Irvine’s which I have not yet entirely read. As far as I have gone they abate much of the hopes which Montgomery’s letter might have excited. It is true that Irvine’s Erving’s opinions must be influenced by the French versions at Madrid, & Montgomery’s by the popular rumors always afloat in such scenes. No answer surely shd. be given to Bollman, nor should...
My Circular was answered by Genl. Breckenridge, approving, as we had done, of the immediate appointment of Terril to the chair of Law, but our 4. colleagues, who were together in Richmond, concluded not to appoint until our meeting in April. In the meantime the term of the present lamented incumbent draws near to a close. About 150. students have already entered, many of those who engaged for...
Your’s of the 4th. is recieved. I think the course which has been taken for sending MelliMeni home is the best: & I concur with you in the expediency of giving no answer to Turreau. indeed his letter does not seem to call for one. in the present state of our affairs it will certainly be better not to appoint a Consul at St. Thomas’s. we must not risk great things for small. a Consul merely to...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate salutations to mr Madison and incloses him the extract of a letter from mr Granger, giving information of constant trespasses committing on a certain species of timber growing on the public lands on lake Erie, of great value, and which he presumes should be the subject of a charge from the Secretary of state to Governor Hull. he presumes the Governor...
I wrote you last on the 22d. since which I have received yours without date, but probably of about the 18th. or 19th. an arrival to the Eastward brings us some news which you will see detailed in the papers. the new partition of Europe is sketched, but how far authentic we know not. it has some probability in it’s form. the French appear busy in their preparations for the invasion of England:...
I hasten the return of the bearer that he may meet you at Brown’s and convey you information as to the road. From Songster’s I tried the road by Ravensworth, which comes into the turnpike road 4½ miles below Fairfax courthouse. There are about 2 miles of it which I think cannot be passed by your carriage without oversetting; and consulting with Colo. Wren who knows both roads, he says there is...
I thank you for the communication of mr. Rush’s letter which I now return. Mr. Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe just and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. He is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. If however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Ths. Jefferson 17 June. 1783,” also “June 17. 1783. ideas of Constitution.” Many years later William Cabell Rives, author of a detailed biography of Madison’s career to 1797, as well as an editor of his papers, added to the docket, “Mr. Henry’s course as to the Impost Act.” Your favours of the 13th. & 20th. Ult. came to hand about a week ago. I am...
My last to you was of the 16th. of March, as was the latest I have received from you. By the proposition to bound our country to the Westward I meant no more than passing an act declaring that that should be our boundary from the moment the people of the Western country and Congress should agree to it. The act of Congress now inclosed to you will shew you that they have agreed to it, because...
Yours of the 1st. was received yesterday. I now return the letters of Higginson, Davis &c. praying that a public vessel may be sent to demand their vessels of the Viceroy of La Plata, indemnity for the detention, & a full performance of existing contracts with the Spanish merchants of La Plata. It would certainly be the first instance of such a demand made by any government from a subordinate....
A letter from Colo. Earle of S.C. induces me to apprehend that the government is called on to reimburse expences to which I am persuaded it is no wise liable either in justice or liberality. I inclose you a copy of my answer to him, as it may induce further enquiry, & particularly of Genl. Dearborn. The Tennisee Senators of that day can also give some information. We have not yet seen the...