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I have percieved in some of our Professors a disinclination to the preparing themselves for entering on the branches of science with which they are charged additionally to their principal one. I took occasion therefore lately to urge one of them (Dr. Emmet) to begin preparations for his Botanical school, for which the previous works necessary furnished unoffensive ground. His answer confirming...
I have percieved in some of our Professors a disinclination to the preparing themselves for entering on the branches of science with which they are charged additionally to their principal one. I took occasion therefore lately to urge one of them (D r Emmet) to begin preparations for his Botanical school, for which the previous works necessary furnished unoffensive ground. his answer confirming...
Mr Wirt declined the offices proposed to him. Mr. Lomax has accepted the Professorship of Law, and will open his school on the 1st day of July. He has paid us a visit, and his appointment appears to have given the highest degree of satisfaction to every body, Professors Students, Neighbors, and to none more than to myself. We have now 166 students, and on the opening of the Law school, we...
From the preceding enactment for the establishment of a President of the University the Subscriber dissents for these reasons 1. because the law constituting the University delineating the organisation of the authorities by which it should be directed and governed and placing at it’s head a board of Rector & Visitors has enumerated with great precision the special powers it meant to give to...
My Circular was answered by Genl. Breckenridge, approving, as we had done, of the immediate appointment of Terril to the chair of Law, but our 4. colleagues, who were together in Richmond, concluded not to appoint until our meeting in April. In the meantime the term of the present lamented incumbent draws near to a close. About 150. students have already entered, many of those who engaged for...
My Circular was answered by Gen l Breckenridge, approving, as we had done, of the immediate appointment of Terril to the chair of Law, but our 4. colleagues, who were together in Richmond, concluded not to appoint until our meeting in April. in the mean time the term of the present lamented incumbent draws near to a close. about 150. Students have already entered, many of those who engaged for...
Circular It is with the sincerest regret I inform you that we are likely to be again at default for our Professor of law. Mr. Gilmer’s situation is become decidedly pulmonary and hopeless. He has not yet been made sensible of the real character of his case and therefore only notifies me in a letter that it is certain he shall not be in health for the commencement of the term, and suggests the...
I now return you Ritchie’s letter and your answer. I have read the last with entire approbation and adoption of it’s views. When my paper was written all was gloom, and the question of roads and canals was thought desperate at Washington after the President’s message. Since that however have appeared the S. C. resolns., Van Buren’s motion, and above all Baylie’s proposn. of Amdmt., believed to...
I now return you Ritchie’s letter and your answer. I have read the latter with entire approbation and adoption of it’s views. when my paper was written, all was gloom, and the question of roads and canals was thought desperate at Washington, after the President’s message. since that however have appeared the S.C. resolutions, Van Buren’s motion, and, above all, Baylie’s proposition for...
I have for some time considered the question of Internal improvemt as desparate. The torrent of general opinion sets so strongly in favor of it as to be irresistable. And I suppose that even the opposition in Congress will hereafter be merely formal, unless something can be done which may give a gleam of encoragement to our friends, or alarm their opponents in their fancied security. I learn...
I have for some time considered the question of Internal improvemt as desparate. the torrent of general opinion sets so strongly in favor of it as to be irresistable. and I suppose that even the opposition in Congress will hereafter be merely formal, unless something can be done which may give a gleam of encoragement to our friends, or alarm their opponents in their fancied security. I learn...
Every thing is going on smoothly at the University. The Students are attending their schools more assiduously, and looking to their Professors with more respect. The authority of the latter is visibly strengthened, as is the confidence of those who visit the place, and the effect, on the whole, has been visibly salutary. The Professors are all lecturing, the two Cantabs however somewhat in the...
Every thing is going on smoothly at the University. the Students are attending their schools more assiduously, and looking to their Professors with more respect. the authority of the latter is visibly strengthened, as is the confidence of those who visit the place, and the effect, on the whole, has been visibly salutary. the Professors are all lecturing, the two Cantabs however somewhat in the...
Circular The state of my health renders it perfectly certain that I shall not be able to attend the next meeting of visitors (Oct. 3) at the University. Yet I think there is no one but myself to whom the matters to be acted on are sufficiently known for communication to them. This adds a reason the more for inducing the members to meet at Monticello the day before, which has been heretofore...
Circular Chancellor Tucker, Mr Barbour, Judge Carr, as you know had declined accepting the law chair of the University, and yesterday I received a letter from Judge Dade finally declining also; Mr Gilmer, our first choice had declined on account of his health, very much deranged by his voyage to Europe. That is now in a great degree reestablished, and he is willing to accept. What shall we do?...
Every offer of our Law chair has been declined, and a late renewal of pressure on Mr. Gilmer has proved him inflexibly decided against undertaking it. What are we to do? The clamor is high for some appointment, we are informed too of many students who do not come because that school is not opened, and some now with us think of leaving us for the same reason. You may remember that among those...
I have received a proposition from Mr. Perry the owner of the lands which separate the two tracts of the University which I think of so much importance to that institution as to communicate to the visiters by letter in their separate situations. The University tract of 100 acres is ¾ of a mile distant from that of the Observatory of 153 acres. The water which supplies the cisterns of the...
Not knowing whether you may have obtained mr. Barber’s acceptance in the visit you proposed, I have thought of a proposition which it has been suggested to me would reconcile him to our offer. If therefore he has not accepted that of joining us at the end of his first circuit, and you would approve of giving him a year on his assurance that he will then accept, be so good as to forward him the...
Not knowing whether you may have obtained mr Barber’s acceptance in the visit you proposed, I have thought of a proposition which it has been suggested to me would reconcile him to our offer. if therefore he has not accepted that of joining us at the end of his first circuit, and you would approve of giving him a year on his assurance that he will then accept, be so good as to forward him the...
George Tucker accepts, as you know, and will be in place early in April. Emmet accepts and will be here about the same time. Henry St. George Tucker declines, expressly on the grounds of the local attachments of his family, with abundance of thanks Etc. to the Visitors; Barbour throws a greedy grapple at both places. I inclose you his letter and my answer. I have still some hope that when he...
George Tucker accepts, as you know, and will be in place early in April. Emmet accepts and will be here about the same time. Henry S t George Tucker declines, expressly on the grounds of the local attachments of his family, with abundance of thanks E t c to the Visitors; Barbour throws a greedy grapple at both places. I inclose you his letter and my answer. I have still some hope that when he...
Considering Chr. Tucker’s acceptance as absolutely desperate, the reasons he assigned being of an immovable character, and the hopeless state in which we should be if Barber also declined I took advge. of his being at our court to ask him to call on me. He did so. I entered with him on the subject of his undertaking our chair of Law. He stiffly maintained at first the preference of his present...
Considering Ch r Tucker’s acceptance as absolutely desperate, the reasons he assigned being of an immoveable character, and the hopeless state in which we should be if Barber also declined I took advge of his being at our court to ask him to call on me. he did so. I entered with him on the subject of his undertaking our chair of Law . he stiffly maintained at first the preference of his...
Our Colleagues on the legislature have called a meeting of the Visitors for the 4th. of March. I presume they have notified you of it by mail, but lest they should not have done so I have thot it safe to inform you. Our newly arrived Professors will come up in the stage of the day after tomorrow. Mr. Cabell writes me that they were much pleased with them in Richmd. We are much so with the two...
Our Colleagues on the legislature have called a meeting of the Visitors for the 4 th of March. I presume they have notified you of it by mail; but lest they should not have done so, I have thought it safe to inform you. Our newly arrived Professors will come up in our Thursday’s stage. mr Cabell writes me that they were much pleased with them in Richmond. we are equally so with the two here. I...
Mr. Cabell’s last letter to me, of Feb. 11. says that if the Professors do not arrive before the assembly rises, they (the Visitors there) shall disperse and a regular call will be necessary; but if they arrive, he and mr. Loyall will come up, from that place, by way of New Canton, and probably in Friday’s stage. Should the former be the case, I should propose, if you approve of it, that as...
M r Cabell’s last letter to me of Feb. 11. says that if the Professors do not arrive before the assembly rises, they (the Visitors there) shall disperse and a regular call will be necessary; but if they arrive, he and mr Loyall will come up, from that place, by way of New Canton, and probably in Friday’s stage. should the former be the case, I should propose, if you approve of it, that as soon...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Genl Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr. Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers); draft ( DLC : Jefferson...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Gen l Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison, Rives Collection.
I concur with you in the favorable opinion of mr. Barber; and altho’ I should prefer Preston, as rather of a more academical cast, yet I could readily give a first vote to Barber. His reputn. in Congress would be of service. In most public seminaries a text-book is prescribed to the several schools as the Norma docendi in them; and this is frequently done by the Trustees. I should not propose...
I concur with you in the favorable opinion of mr Barber; and altho’ I should prefer Preston, as rather of a more acadamical cast, yet I could readily give a first vote to Barber. his reputn in Congress would be of service. In most public seminaries a text-book is prescribed to the several schools as the Norma docendi in them; and this is frequently done by the Trustees. I should not propose...
I inclose you a letter from mr. Cabell and a copy of the bill I prepared and sent him as he requested. I send you also a letter from mr. Gilmer, by which he seems determd. not to undertake our professorship. What are we to do? I abhor the idea of a mere Gothic lawyer who has no idea beyond his Coke Littleton, who could not associate in conversation with his Colleagues, nor utter a single...
I inclose you a letter from mr Cabell and a copy of the bill I prepared and sent him as he requested. I send you also a letter from mr Gilmer, by which he seems determ d not to undertake our professorship. what are we to do? I abhor the idea of a mere Gothic lawyer who has no idea beyond his Coke Littleton, who could not associate in conversation with his Colleagues, nor utter a single...
I inclose you a long letter from mr. Cabell and a long answer from myself, not much worth reading, but that it is well you should know every thing. No letter from Gilmer since my last, but he is believed to be now in Richmond. Long and Blaettermann are here located in their pavilions as drawn by lot. The former is a fine young man and well qualified. The latter rather a rough looking German,...
I inclose you a long letter from mr Cabell and a long answer from my self, not much work reading, but that it is well you should know every thing. no letter from Gilmer since my last. but he is believed to be now in Richmond. Long and Blaettermann are here located in their pavilions as drawn by lot. the former is a fine young man and well qualified. the latter rather a rough looking German,...
I send you the sequel of Gilmer’s letters recd. since my last to you. Torrey you will see does not accept. I had before recd. from the Secy. at War the inclosed letter to him from mr. Emmet the father recommending his son Doctr. John Patton Emmet, for Professor of Chemistry. Considering that branch as expected by Doctr. Dunglison I had given an answer that the place was filled. But learning...
I send you the sequel of Gilmer’s letters rec d since my last to you. Torrey you will see does not accept. I had before rec d from the Sec y at War the inclosed letter to him from mr Emmet the father recommending his son Doct r John Patton Emmet, for Professor of Chemistry. considering that branch as expected by Doct r Dunglison I have given an answer that the place was filled. but learning...
I detained the inclosed letters awhile to enable me to write my letter of informn. addnal. to our Report to the Governor, and then in expectation some of the Visitors might call on their way to the legislature and wish to read them. None have called however, and I now inclose them for your perusal. On the reciept of Gilmer’s letter of Sep. 15. from London which came to hand 3. days after those...
I detained the inclosed letters awhile to enable me to write my letter of informn addnal to our Report to the Governor, and then in expectation some of the Visitors might call on their way to the legislature and wish to read them. none have called however, and I now inclose them for your perusal. on the reciept of Gilmer’s letter of Sep. 15. from London which came to hand 3. days after those...
Gilmer is arrived in N. York sick of a fever which he has had thro’ the whole voyage of 35. days and likely to remain there some time in the hands of the Doctors. He has engaged 5. Professors to wit George Long, Antient languages. George Blaetterman, Modern do. Thos. H. Key, Mathematics. Charles Bonnycastle (son of the Mathematician) Nat. Philos. Robley Dunglison Anatomy &c. This last wishes...
Gilmer is arrived in N. York sick of a fever which he has had thro’ the whole voyage of 35. days and likely to remain there some time in the hands of the Doctors. he has engaged 5. Professors to wit George Long, Antient languages. George Blaetterman. Modern d o Tho s H. Key. Mathematics. Charles Bonnycastle (son of the Mathematician) Nat. Philos. Robley Dunglison Anatomy E t c this last wishes...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. He leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg. on Saturday. The miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. They go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. No...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. he leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg on Saturday. the miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. they go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. no...
I recieved yesterday from La Fayette a letter confirming his movements as stated in the Enquirer of Friday last. He says he will be here on Thursday next, and expresses his hope to meet you here. I presume you also have heard from him, but hope, at any rate, this will reach you in time to be with us on Wednesday. If mrs Madison will accompany you it will be the more welcome to us all. There is...
I recieved yesterday from La Fayette a letter confirming his movements as stated in the Enquirer of Friday last. he says he will be here on Thursday next, and expresses his hope to meet you here. I presume you also have heard from him, but hope, at any rate, this will reach you in time to be with us on Wednesday. if mrs Madison will accompany you it will be the more welcome to us all. there is...
I wished to have communicated to you my letter to Gilmer before I sent it off. But the danger of it’s not getting there before his departure induced me to dispatch it by mail for the packet from N. York, as soon as written. My rough draught being illegible, I have taken time to make a legible copy, now inclosed for your perusal. I think there is nothing in it which does not accord with the...
I wished to have communicated to you my letter to Gilmer before I sent it off. but the danger of it’s not getting there before his departure induced me to dispatch it by mail for the packet from N. York, as soon as written. my rough draught being illegible, I have taken time to make a legible copy, now inclosed for your perusal. I think there is nothing in it which does not accord with the...
The reciept of the inclosed letter did not give me more pleasure than I feel in communicating it to you. It has dispelled the gloom which that from Edinbg. had produced, and gives me hopes that all will end well. With a good Professor of Modern languages assured, a good one of antt. languages in view, a prime Mathematician engaged, we want really nothing essential but an able Natl....
The reciept of the inclosed letter did not give me more pleasure than I feel in communicating it to you. it dispelled the gloom which that from Edinbg had produced and gives me hopes that all will end well. with a good Professor of mod. lang. assured, a good one of ant t languages in view, a prime Mathematician engaged we want really nothing essential but an able Nat. Phil. and that he cannot...
Within 6. hours after we had all dispersed yesterday to our several homes, the inclosed most unwelcome letter came to hand. I have never recieved a greater damper on my hopes and spirits. It is so contrary to the state of things as given us by Ticknor, a state which I cannot but still respect, because he had staid many months at each of those places. Gilmer says there are Professors who...