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¶ From Thomas Jefferson. Letter not found. 2 June 1820 . Enclosed in Dolley Madison to Lewis J. Cist, 4 July 1842 ( DLC : Dolley Madison Papers).
The inclosed letter to mr Cabell so fully explains it’s object, and the grounds on which your signature to the paper is proposed if approved, that I will spare my stiffening & aching wrist the pain of adding more than the assurance of my constant & affect te friendship. DNT .
Not knowing whether you may have obtained mr Barber’s acceptance in the visit you proposed, I have thought of a proposition which it has been suggested to me would reconcile him to our offer. if therefore he has not accepted that of joining us at the end of his first circuit, and you would approve of giving him a year on his assurance that he will then accept, be so good as to forward him the...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. he leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg on Saturday. the miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. they go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. no...
I am near closing my catalogue, and it is important I should recieve the kindness of your Theological supplement, by the 1 st or 2 d mail, or it’s insertion will be impracticable. be so good as to expedite it as much as possible. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
I wished to have communicated to you my letter to Gilmer before I sent it off. but the danger of it’s not getting there before his departure induced me to dispatch it by mail for the packet from N. York, as soon as written. my rough draught being illegible, I have taken time to make a legible copy, now inclosed for your perusal. I think there is nothing in it which does not accord with the...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Gen l Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison, Rives Collection.
Letter not found. 29 June 1819, Monticello. Described as a one-page autograph letter, signed, offered for sale 17–21 Mar. 1891 in the Catalogue of Autograph Letters and Historical Documents, Collected by the Late Prof. E. H. Leffingwell , (2 vols. in 1; Boston, 1891), 2:32, item 3633.
I am near closing my catalogue, and it is important I should recieve the kindness of your Theological supplement, by the 1st. or 2d. mail, or it’s insertion will be impracticable. Be so good as to expedite it as much as possible. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC ).
A visit of the ladies of our family to mrs Madison gives me an opportunity of sending you our correspondence with D r Cooper & of recieving it back again safely. it is necessary to observe that our first letter & his first crossed each other on the road, so that each party had expressed their mind before knowing that of the other. on the whole this embarrassed transaction ends well enough,...
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. we should have recognised the stile even without a signature and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. this is a sample of the effects we...
I have no doubt you have occasionally been led to reflect on the character of the duty imposed by Congress on the importation of books. Some few years ago, when the tariff was before Congress, I engaged some of our members of Congress to endeavor to get the duty repealed, and wrote on the subject to some other acquaintances in Congress, and pressingly to the Secretary of the treasury. The...
By this day’s mail I forward you ⅓ of a parcel of seeds of the Sea-Kale sent here by Gen l Cock for you, mr Divers & myself. I feared to await a private conveyance because they lose their vegetative power if not planted soon. The day after you left us I was taken with a cholic which attended with a stricture on the upper bowels brought me into great pain & immediate danger. the obstacle was at...
I recieved yesterday the inclosed letter proposing to me an interposition which my situation renders impracticable. the gentlemen of my family have manifested at times some opposition to mr Nelson’s elections: which has produced an intermission of intercourse between the families: and altho’ I never took the smallest part in it, and nothing but what is respectful has ever passed between mr...
I have percieved in some of our Professors a disinclination to the preparing themselves for entering on the branches of science with which they are charged additionally to their principal one. I took occasion therefore lately to urge one of them (Dr. Emmet) to begin preparations for his Botanical school, for which the previous works necessary furnished unoffensive ground. His answer confirming...
The promptitude & success of our subscription paper , now amounting to upwards of 20,000.D. with a prospect much beyond that renders the decision immediately necessary of some important questions which I had thought might have laid over to our periodical meeting the last of September. having an opportunity of writing to Gen l Cocke , I invited him to join me in a visit to you on Friday the 25...
I recieved yesterday from La Fayette a letter confirming his movements as stated in the Enquirer of Friday last. He says he will be here on Thursday next, and expresses his hope to meet you here. I presume you also have heard from him, but hope, at any rate, this will reach you in time to be with us on Wednesday. If mrs Madison will accompany you it will be the more welcome to us all. There is...
Every thing is going on smoothly at the University. the Students are attending their schools more assiduously, and looking to their Professors with more respect. the authority of the latter is visibly strengthened, as is the confidence of those who visit the place, and the effect, on the whole, has been visibly salutary. the Professors are all lecturing, the two Cantabs however somewhat in the...
Besey calling on me for some seed allows me just time to write a line, to await your arrival at home, requesting your attendance as a visitor of our proposed college on Tuesday the 8 th of April, being the day after our election. you will of course, I am in hopes come here the day or evening before, that we may have some previous consultation on the subject. I shall also request Gen l Cocke &...
I returned from Bedford a week ago, after an absence of 6. weeks, and found here the Palladio, with your two favors of Nov. 29. & Dec. 1 & with 3. from Dr. Cooper, written before he had received one from me of Nov. 25. from Poplar Forest. It was agreed, you know, that we should make a report of our proceedings & prospects to the Govr. as our patron to be laid before the legislature. Being...
You already know that the legislature has authorised the literary board to lend us another 60.000 D. It is necessary we should act on this immediately so far as to accept the loan, that we may engage our workmen before they enter into other undertakings for the season. But the badness of the roads, the uncertainty of the weather and the personal inconvenience of a journey to the members of our...
George Tucker accepts, as you know, and will be in place early in April. Emmet accepts and will be here about the same time. Henry S t George Tucker declines, expressly on the grounds of the local attachments of his family, with abundance of thanks E t c to the Visitors; Barbour throws a greedy grapple at both places. I inclose you his letter and my answer. I have still some hope that when he...
I have got thro’ my catalogue except the Alphabet and send you the result. The inclosed table shews the number, size, and cost of the whole and it’s parts. 6860. vols will cost 24.076 D. or 3½ D. a vol. on an average of all sizes. If we get our 50. M D and also if 10.000 would do for apparatus, there would remain 16.000. to invest in stock. This would give us 1000 D. a year for ever which...
I heard in Bedford that you were attaked with the prevailing fever, and with great joy on my return that you were recovered from it. in the strange state of the health of our country every fever gives alarm. I got home from Bedford on the 27 th and am obliged to return there within 3. or 4. days, having an appointment at the Natural bridge on the 11 th prox. as our proposed petition to...
As the measures which were adopted at the last meeting of our visitors were of a very leading character I have thought it proper to inform our absent colleagues of them; and have delayed the communication only until I could add what has been done under the resolutions of the board. as this latter information has not been recieved by you, I inclose you my letter to General Taylor for perusal...
I rec d yesterday a letter from mr Gilmer which I now inclose, as also a former one, which had only communicated his arrival at Liverpool. I add also a letter from mr Rush. so far his trust is going on well. I wish the suggestion of mr Brougham respecting Ivory may be found groundless. there is no mathematician in Gr. Britain who can rival him but Woodhouse professor of Mathematics at...
I send you the sequel of Gilmer’s letters rec d since my last to you. Torrey you will see does not accept. I had before rec d from the Sec y at War the inclosed letter to him from mr Emmet the father recommending his son Doct r John Patton Emmet, for Professor of Chemistry. considering that branch as expected by Doct r Dunglison I have given an answer that the place was filled. but learning...
The inclosed lre in Gr. Lat. Fr. and Eng. with it’s accompaniments being intended for your inspection as much as mine, is now forwarded for your perusal. you will be so good as to reinclose them that I may return them to the writer. the answer I propose to give is, what I have given on all similar applications, that until the debt of the University is discharged, and it’s funds liberated, the...
I return you mr Coxe’s letter which has cost me much time at two or three different attempts to decypher it. had I such a correspondent I should certainly admonish him that if he would not so far respect my time as to write to me legibly, I should so far respect it myself as not to waste it in decomposing and recomposing his hieroglyphics. The jarrings between the friends of Hamilton and...
Circular Notwithstanding the reduction which was made in the rents proposed, it appears that that on the salaries will so much enlarge our surplus, that we may very safely engage 8. professors, and still have a surplus this year of 6000. D. and annually after of 5024 D. The opportunity of procuring the anatomical professor is so advantageous, that I propose to make the provisional instruction...
Considering Ch r Tucker’s acceptance as absolutely desperate, the reasons he assigned being of an immoveable character, and the hopeless state in which we should be if Barber also declined I took advge of his being at our court to ask him to call on me. he did so. I entered with him on the subject of his undertaking our chair of Law . he stiffly maintained at first the preference of his...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. A detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr. Watson being sick, only Genl. Cocke, mr. Cabell and myself met. Altho’ not a...
The person who hands you this letter is an interesting subject of curiosity. he was taken prisoner by the Kickapoos when he supposes he must have been about 3. or 4. years of age, knows not whence taken, nor who were his parents. he escaped from the Indians at about 19. as he supposes, & about 7. years ago. he has applied himself to education, is a student of Medecine, & has assumed the name...
I return your letter to the President, and that of mr. Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. The matters which mr. Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. But that about the navigation of the St. Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. The navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
I thank you for the communication of mr. Rush’s letter which I now return. Mr. Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe just and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. He is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. If however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
With this letter I commit for you to the mail a bundle of seeds, one parcel of which was sent by you to mr. Randolph for inspection. The other is seakale seed lodged here for you by Genl. Cocke. Have I returned your Vitruvius to you? I am in great tribulation about it? I keep my borrowed books on a particular shelf that they may neither be forgotten nor confounded with my own. It is not on...
I have read mr. Cox’s letters and some of his papers, which I now return you. It is impossible for me to write to him. With two crippled hands I abandon writing but from the most urgent necessities; and above all things I should not meddle in a Presidential election, nor even express a sentiment on the subject of the Candidates. As you propose to write to him, will you be so good as to add a...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. He leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg. on Saturday. The miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. They go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. No...
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr. Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting Wm. & Mary Coll. which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return when read, that I may be enabled to lodge my answer in Richmd. before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
Our Colleagues on the legislature have called a meeting of the Visitors for the 4 th of March. I presume they have notified you of it by mail; but lest they should not have done so, I have thought it safe to inform you. Our newly arrived Professors will come up in our Thursday’s stage. mr Cabell writes me that they were much pleased with them in Richmond. we are equally so with the two here. I...
The inclosed letter to mr. Cabell so fully explains it’s object, and the grounds on which your signature to the paper is proposed if approved, that I will spare my stiffening & aching wrist the pain of adding more than the assurance of my constant & affectte. friendship. We the subscribers, visitors of the University of Virginia being of opinion that it will be to the interest of that...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. a detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr Watson being sick, only Gen l Cocke , mr Cabell
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting W m & Mary College, which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter, as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return, when read, that I may be able to lodge my answer in Richmond before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...
I send you two letters of Dr. Cooper for perusal. Altho’ the trustees of that College and the Legislature have supported him most triumphantly against his clerical persecutors, yet it is evident he does not feel himself secure. I think you will see from these letters that he keeps us in his eye. And altho’ I doubt, were he now offered a place here, whether he would think he could accept it...
I have for some time considered the question of Internal improvemt as desparate. the torrent of general opinion sets so strongly in favor of it as to be irresistable. and I suppose that even the opposition in Congress will hereafter be merely formal, unless something can be done which may give a gleam of encoragement to our friends, or alarm their opponents in their fancied security. I learn...
Within 6. hours after we had all dispersed yesterday to our several homes, the inclosed most unwelcome letter came to hand. I have never recieved a greater damper on my hopes and spirits. it is so contrary to the state of things as given us by Ticknor, a state which I cannot but still respect, because he had staid many months at each of those places. Gilmer says there are Professors who...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Genl Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr. Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers); draft ( DLC : Jefferson...
I have got thro’ my catalogue except the Alphabet and send you the result. the inclosed table shews the number, size, and cost of the whole and it’s parts. 6860. vols will cost 24,076 D. or 3 1\2 D. a vol. on an average of all sizes. if we get our 50. M D and also if 10,000 would do for apparatus, these would remain 16,000. to invest in stock. this would give us 1000 D. a year for ever which...
Yours of the 12 th has been duly recieved, and the pamphlet it covered has been sent to mr Minor.The late day to which the Governor has fixed the 1 st meeting of the Visitors of the University (the last Monday in March) renders a meeting of the College visitors immediately necessary, some measures of high importance to the institution not admitting that delay; & the Law having authorised us to...
The law establishing the University requires the Visitors to make a report annually embracing a full account of the disbursements, the funds on hand, and a general statement of the condition of the sd. University. The account of disbursements and funds belongs to the Bursar & Proctor, who are accordingly instructed to have them made up to the last day of this month. The condition of the...