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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I have percieved in some of our Professors a disinclination to the preparing themselves for entering on the branches of science with which they are charged additionally to their principal one. I took occasion therefore lately to urge one of them (D r Emmet) to begin preparations for his Botanical school, for which the previous works necessary furnished unoffensive ground. his answer confirming...
Yours of Mar. 29. came to duly to hand, but I put off answering it because I expected to have written sooner by the bearer of the present mr Coffee . nothing presses as to the payment of the instalment which is the subject of your letter . it may either be paid to the Richm d bank of Virginia , or sent to mr Garret or
I have attentively read your letter to mr Wheaton on the question whether at the date of the message to Congress, recommending the embargo of 1807 we had knolege of the order of council of Nov. 11. and according to your request I have resorted to my papers, as well as to my memory, for the testimony these might afford, additional to yours. there is no fact in the course of my life which I...
From the preceding enactment for the establishment of a President of the University the Subscriber dissents for these reasons 1. because the law constituting the University delineating the organisation of the authorities by which it should be directed and governed and placing at it’s head a board of Rector & Visitors has enumerated with great precision the special powers it meant to give to...
Our brewing for the use of the present year has been some time over. About the last of Oct. or beginning of Nov. we begin for the ensuing year, and malt and brew 3. 60 galln casks successively , which will give so many successive lessons to the person you send. On his return he can try his hand with you in order to discover what parts of the processes he will have learnt imperfectly, and come...
My neighbor, friend and physician, Doctr. Watkins, being called to Philadelphia, is desirous to pay his respects to you en passant, and asks me, by a line to you, to lessen his scruples on doing so. You will find my justification in his character when known to you. His understanding is excellent, well informed, of pleasant conversation and of great worth. As a Physician I should trust myself...
Gilmer is arrived in N. York sick of a fever which he has had thro’ the whole voyage of 35. days and likely to remain there some time in the hands of the Doctors. he has engaged 5. Professors to wit George Long, Antient languages. George Blaetterman. Modern d o Tho s H. Key. Mathematics. Charles Bonnycastle (son of the Mathematician) Nat. Philos. Robley Dunglison Anatomy E t c this last wishes...
I have read mr Cox’s letters and some of his papers, which I now return you. it is impossible for me to write to him. with two crippled hands I abandon writing but from the most urgent necessities; and above all things I should not meddle in a Presidential election, nor even express a sentiment on the subject of the Candidates. as you propose to write to him, will you be so good as to add a...
I wished to have communicated to you my letter to Gilmer before I sent it off. but the danger of it’s not getting there before his departure induced me to dispatch it by mail for the packet from N. York, as soon as written. my rough draught being illegible, I have taken time to make a legible copy, now inclosed for your perusal. I think there is nothing in it which does not accord with the...
The law establishing the University requires the Visitors to make a report annually embracing a full account of the disbursements, the funds on hand, and a general statement of the condition of the sd University. the account of disbursements and funds belongs to the Bursar & Proctor, who are accordingly instructed to have them made up to the last day of this month. the condition of the...
I communicated to you a former part of a correspondence between Judge Johnson of Charleston and myself, chiefly on the practice of caucusing opinions which is that of the supreme court of the US. but on some other matters also, particularly his history of parties. In a late letter he asks me to give him my idea of the precise principles & views of the Republicans in their oppositions to the...
In two packages, distinct from this letter, I return you your father’s meteorological diaries, which you were so kind as to lend me, and a piece on paper money recieved from you some time ago. From the former I have made out tables of rain and snow, and a calendar of animal and vegetable matters announcing the advance of seasons. Having now compleated 7. years of observations since my return...
I have no doubt you have recieved, as I have done, a letter from Dr. Morse with a printed pamphlet, proposing to us a place in a self constituted society for the civilisation of the Indians &c. I am anxious to know your thoughts on the subject because they would affect my confidence in my own. I disapprove the proposition altogether. I acknolege the right of voluntary associations for laudable...
We are sadly at a loss here for a Palladio. I had three different editions, but they are at Washington, and nobody in this part of the country has one unless you have. If you have you will greatly aid us by letting us have the use of it for a year to come. It will come safely by the stage, and may be left at the stage office of either Milton or Charlottesville, & either postmaster will pay the...
I send you two letters of D r Cooper for perusal. altho’ the trustees of that College and the Legislature have supported him most triumphantly against his clerical persecutors, yet it is evident he does not feel himself secure. I think you will see from these letters that he keeps us in his eye. and altho’ I doubt, were he now offered a place here, whether he would think he could accept it...
Being to set out in a few days for Bedford from whence I shall not return till about a week before our Rockfish meeting, I have been preparing such a report as I can, to be offered there to our colleagues . it is not such an one as I should propose to them to make to an assembly of philosophers, who would require nothing but the table of professorships, but I have endeavored to adapt it to our...
I return your letter to the President, and that of mr Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. the matters which mr Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. but that about the navigation of the S t Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. the navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
Gilmer is arrived in N. York sick of a fever which he has had thro’ the whole voyage of 35. days and likely to remain there some time in the hands of the Doctors. He has engaged 5. Professors to wit George Long, Antient languages. George Blaetterman, Modern do. Thos. H. Key, Mathematics. Charles Bonnycastle (son of the Mathematician) Nat. Philos. Robley Dunglison Anatomy &c. This last wishes...
I inclose you a letter from mr. Cabell and a copy of the bill I prepared and sent him as he requested. I send you also a letter from mr. Gilmer, by which he seems determd. not to undertake our professorship. What are we to do? I abhor the idea of a mere Gothic lawyer who has no idea beyond his Coke Littleton, who could not associate in conversation with his Colleagues, nor utter a single...
I forward you two most imporant letters sent to me by the President and add his letter to me by which you will percieve his primâ facie views. this you will be so good as to return to me, and forward the others to him I have recieved Trumbull’s print of the Decln of Independance, & turning to his letter am able to inform you more certainly than I could by memory that the print costs 20. D. &...
I have for some time considered the question of Internal improvemt as desparate. The torrent of general opinion sets so strongly in favor of it as to be irresistable. And I suppose that even the opposition in Congress will hereafter be merely formal, unless something can be done which may give a gleam of encoragement to our friends, or alarm their opponents in their fancied security. I learn...
I now return you Ritchie’s letter and your answer. I have read the last with entire approbation and adoption of it’s views. When my paper was written all was gloom, and the question of roads and canals was thought desperate at Washington after the President’s message. Since that however have appeared the S. C. resolns., Van Buren’s motion, and above all Baylie’s proposn. of Amdmt., believed to...
I concur with entire satisfaction in your amendment of my resolution, and am peculiarly pleased with your insertion of Gen l Wash’ns addresses, which had not occurred to me or I should have referred to them also. I send you another letter of mr Cabell’s which I think you will read with pleasure. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison, Rives Collection.
I send you a mass of reading, and so rapidly does my hand fail me in writing that I can give but very briefly the necessary explanations. 1. mr Cabell’s letter to me & mine to him which passed each other on the road will give you the state of things respecting the University, and I am happy to add that letters recieved from Appleton give us reason to expect our capitels by the first vessel...
I heard in Bedford that you were attaked with the prevailing fever, and with great joy on my return that you were recovered from it. In the strange state of the health of our country every fever gives alarm. I got home from Bedford on the 27th. and am obliged to return there within 3. or 4. days, having an appointment at the Natural bridge on the 11th. prox. As our proposed petition to...
Letter not found. 29 June 1819, Monticello. Described as a one-page autograph letter, signed, offered for sale 17–21 Mar. 1891 in the Catalogue of Autograph Letters and Historical Documents, Collected by the Late Prof. E. H. Leffingwell , (2 vols. in 1; Boston, 1891), 2:32, item 3633.
Within 6. hours after we had all dispersed yesterday to our several homes, the inclosed most unwelcome letter came to hand. I have never recieved a greater damper on my hopes and spirits. It is so contrary to the state of things as given us by Ticknor, a state which I cannot but still respect, because he had staid many months at each of those places. Gilmer says there are Professors who...
Preparing within 4. or 5. days to set out for Bedford, where I shall continue two months, I have thought it would be acceptable to you to learn the present state of things at the University, and the prospect for the year. You may remember that almost in the moment of our separation at the last meeting, one of our Colleagues proposed a change of a part of the plan so as to place the gardens of...
You already know that the legislature has authorised the literary board to lend us another 60,000 D. it is necessary we should act on this immediately so far as to accept the loan, that we may engage our workmen before they enter into other undertakings for the season. but the badness of the roads, the uncertainty of the weather, and the personal inconvenience of a journey to the members of...
Every thing is going on smoothly at the University. The Students are attending their schools more assiduously, and looking to their Professors with more respect. The authority of the latter is visibly strengthened, as is the confidence of those who visit the place, and the effect, on the whole, has been visibly salutary. The Professors are all lecturing, the two Cantabs however somewhat in the...
I thank you for the communication of mr Rush’s letter which I now return. mr Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe unjust and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. he is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. if however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
I sincerely congratulate you on your release from incessant labors, corroding anxieties, active enemies & interested friends, & on your return to your books & farm, to tranquility & independance. a day of these is worth ages of the former. but all this you know. yours of the 10 th was delivered to me yesterday. mine of the 13 th had been sent off the moment it was written. we are made happy by...
I am near closing my catalogue, and it is important I should recieve the kindness of your Theological supplement, by the 1st. or 2d. mail, or it’s insertion will be impracticable. Be so good as to expedite it as much as possible. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC ).
I inclose you a long letter from mr Cabell and a long answer from my self, not much work reading, but that it is well you should know every thing. no letter from Gilmer since my last. but he is believed to be now in Richmond. Long and Blaettermann are here located in their pavilions as drawn by lot. the former is a fine young man and well qualified. the latter rather a rough looking German,...
I recieved yesterday the inclosed Letter proposing to me an interposition which my situation renders impracticable. The gentlemen of my family have manifested at times some opposition to mr. Nelson’s elections: which has produced an intermission of intercourse between the families: and altho’ I never took the smallest part in it, and nothing but what is respectful has ever passed between mr....
Being to set out in a few days for Bedford from whence I shall not return till about a week before our Rockfish meeting, I have been preparing such a report as I can, to be offered there to our colleagues. It is not such an one as I should propose to them to make to an assembly of philosophers, who would require nothing but the table of professorships, but I have endeavored to adapt it to our...
Proposing within 4. or 5. days to set out for Bedford, where I shall continue two months, I have thought it would be acceptable to you to learn the present state of things at the University, and the prospect for the year. you may remember that almost in the moment of our separation at the last meeting, one of our Colleagues proposed a change of a part of the plan so as to place the gardens of...
Mr Wirt declined the offices proposed to him. Mr. Lomax has accepted the Professorship of Law, and will open his school on the 1st day of July. He has paid us a visit, and his appointment appears to have given the highest degree of satisfaction to every body, Professors Students, Neighbors, and to none more than to myself. We have now 166 students, and on the opening of the Law school, we...
I concur with you in the favorable opinion of mr. Barber; and altho’ I should prefer Preston, as rather of a more academical cast, yet I could readily give a first vote to Barber. His reputn. in Congress would be of service. In most public seminaries a text-book is prescribed to the several schools as the Norma docendi in them; and this is frequently done by the Trustees. I should not propose...
Mr. Cabell’s last letter to me, of Feb. 11. says that if the Professors do not arrive before the assembly rises, they (the Visitors there) shall disperse and a regular call will be necessary; but if they arrive, he and mr. Loyall will come up, from that place, by way of New Canton, and probably in Friday’s stage. Should the former be the case, I should propose, if you approve of it, that as...
The reciept of the inclosed letter did not give me more pleasure than I feel in communicating it to you. It has dispelled the gloom which that from Edinbg. had produced, and gives me hopes that all will end well. With a good Professor of Modern languages assured, a good one of antt. languages in view, a prime Mathematician engaged, we want really nothing essential but an able Natl....
The person who hands you this letter is an interesting subject of curiosity. He was taken prisoner by the Kickapoos when he supposes he must have been about 3. or 4. years of age, knows not whence taken nor who were his parents. He escaped from the Indians at about 19. as he supposes, & about 7. years ago. He has applied himself to education, is a student of Medecine, & has assumed the name of...
The inclosed lre. in Gr. Lat. Fr. and Eng. with it’s accompaniments being intended for your inspection as much as mine, is now forwarded for your perusal. You will be so good as to reinclose them that I may return them to the writer. The answer I propose to give is, what I have given on all similar applications, that until the debt of the University is discharged, and it’s funds liberated, the...
I return you mr. Coxe’s letter without saying I have read it. I made out enough to see that it was about the Missouri question, and the printed papers told me on which side he was. could I have devoted a day to it, by interlining the words as I could pick them out, I might have got at more. the last books of Livy or Tacitus might be worth this. our friend would do well to write less and write...
As the measures which were adopted at the last meeting of our visitors were of a very leading character I have thought it proper to inform our absent colleagues of them; and have delayed the communication only until I could add what has been done under the resolutions of the board. As this latter information has not been received by you, I inclose you my letter to General Taylor for perusal...
A visit of the ladies of our family to mrs. Madison gives me an opportunity of sending you our correspondence with Dr. Cooper & of recieving it back again safely. It is necessary to observe that our first letter & his first crossed each other on the road, so that each party had expressed their mind before knowing that of the other. On the whole this embarrassed transaction ends well enough,...
Your favor of Mar. 29. did not come to hand until the 4 th instant. only mr Cabell, Gen l Cocke and myself attended. mess rs Johnson and Taylor were retained in Richmond on Lithgow’s case, and Gen l Breckenridge hindered by business. it was not material as there was not a single thing requisite to act on. we have to finish the 4. rows and appendages this summer which will be done and then to...
I recieved the inclosed letters from the President with a request that after perusal, I would forward them to you, for perusal by yourself also and to be returned then to him. You have doubtless seen Timothy Pickering’s 4 th of July Observations on the Declaration of Independance. if his principles and prejudices personal and political, gave us no reason to doubt whether he had truly quoted...
My Circular was answered by Gen l Breckenridge, approving, as we had done, of the immediate appointment of Terril to the chair of Law, but our 4. colleagues, who were together in Richmond, concluded not to appoint until our meeting in April. in the mean time the term of the present lamented incumbent draws near to a close. about 150. Students have already entered, many of those who engaged for...
I inclose you a letter from Dr. Cooper, considerably important to the first successes of our college. I will request you to return it to me. I inclose also the answer which I think should be given. If you think so likewise be so good as to seal & forward it. If not, return it, as I should be unwilling to take on myself alone so important a relinquishment. Yet I think it right that we should...