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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The anxieties expressed in the inclosed letter are pointed to 3. articles. 1. the size of the lecturing rooms. 2. depositories for the Apparatuses. 3. the arrangement of the seats for the Students. 1. If we could have foretold what number of students would come to our University, and what proportion of them would be in attendance on any one Professor at one time, lecturing rooms might have...
The law establishing the University requires the Visitors to make a report annually embracing a full account of the disbursements, the funds on hand, and a general statement of the condition of the sd. University. The account of disbursements and funds belongs to the Bursar & Proctor, who are accordingly instructed to have them made up to the last day of this month. The condition of the...
I now return you Ritchie’s letter and your answer. I have read the latter with entire approbation and adoption of it’s views. when my paper was written, all was gloom, and the question of roads and canals was thought desperate at Washington, after the President’s message. since that however have appeared the S.C. resolutions, Van Buren’s motion, and, above all, Baylie’s proposition for...
I recieved the inclosed letters from the President with a request that after perusal, I would forward them to you, for perusal by yourself also and to be returned then to him. You have doubtless seen Timothy Pickering’s 4th. of July Observations on the Declaration of Independance. If his principles and prejudices personal and political, gave us no reason to doubt whether he had truly quoted...
I detained the inclosed letters awhile to enable me to write my letter of informn. addnal. to our Report to the Governor, and then in expectation some of the Visitors might call on their way to the legislature and wish to read them. None have called however, and I now inclose them for your perusal. On the reciept of Gilmer’s letter of Sep. 15. from London which came to hand 3. days after those...
I return you mr. Coxe’s letter which has cost me much time at two or three different attempts to decypher it. Had I such a correspondent I should certainly admonish him that if he would not so far respect my time as to write to me legibly, I should so far respect it myself as not to waste it in decomposing and recomposing his hieroglyphics. The jarrings between the friends of Hamilton and...
I returned from Bedford a week ago, after an absence of 6. weeks, and found here the Palladio , with your two favors of Nov. 29. & Dec. 1 & with 3. from D r Cooper , written before he had recieved
In obedience to the resolution of the visitors of the university at their last session, the Proctor has been constantly employed in “ascertaining the state of accounts under contracts already made, and the expence of compleating the buildings begun and contemplated”: and we have consequently suspended, according to instructions, “the entering into any contracts for the Library until we see...
Every offer of our Law chair has been declined, and a late renewal of pressure on Mr. Gilmer has proved him inflexibly decided against undertaking it. What are we to do? The clamor is high for some appointment, we are informed too of many students who do not come because that school is not opened, and some now with us think of leaving us for the same reason. You may remember that among those...
I inclose you a letter recieved last night from mr Cabell containing intersting information as to our University as well as something further with respect to D r Cooper. be so good as to return it with those formerly sent you. I recieved by the same mail a commission as visitor, and an authentic appointment of the last Monday of this month for our first meeting at the University. I have...
Yours of the 12th. has been duly recieved, and the pamphlet it covered has been sent to mr. Minor. The late day to which the Governor has fixed the 1st. meeting of the Visitors of the University (the last Monday in March) renders a meeting of the College visitors immediately necessary, some measures of high importance to the institution not admitting that delay; & the Law having authorised us...
I promised your gardener some seeds which I put under a separate cover and address to you by mail. I also inclose you a letter from mr Cabell which will shew you that the ‘sour grapes of W m & Mary are spreading; but certainly not to the ‘enlightened part of society’ as the letter supposes. I have sent him a transcript from our journals that he may see how far we are under engagements to D r...
Circular It is with the sincerest regret I inform you that we are likely to be again at default for our Professor of law. Mr. Gilmer’s situation is become decidedly pulmonary and hopeless. He has not yet been made sensible of the real character of his case and therefore only notifies me in a letter that it is certain he shall not be in health for the commencement of the term, and suggests the...
My neighbor, friend and physician, Doct r Watkins, being called to Philadelphia, is desirous to pay his respects to you en passant , and asks me, by a line to you, to lessen his scruples on doing so. you will find my justification in his character when known to you. his understanding is excellent, well informed, of pleasant conversation and of great worth. as a Physician I should trust myself...
Not knowing whether you may have obtained mr. Barber’s acceptance in the visit you proposed, I have thought of a proposition which it has been suggested to me would reconcile him to our offer. If therefore he has not accepted that of joining us at the end of his first circuit, and you would approve of giving him a year on his assurance that he will then accept, be so good as to forward him the...
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. We should have recognised the stile even without a signature, and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. This is a sample of the effects we...
With this letter I commit for you to the mail a bundle of seeds, one parcel of which was sent by you to mr Randolph for inspection. the other is seakale seed lodged here for you by Gen l Cocke. have I returned your Vetruvius to you? I am in great tribulation about it? I keep my borrowed books on a particular shelf that they may neither be forgotten nor confounded with my own. it is not on that...
I send you the sequel of Gilmer’s letters recd. since my last to you. Torrey you will see does not accept. I had before recd. from the Secy. at War the inclosed letter to him from mr. Emmet the father recommending his son Doctr. John Patton Emmet, for Professor of Chemistry. Considering that branch as expected by Doctr. Dunglison I had given an answer that the place was filled. But learning...
Circular The state of my health renders it perfectly certain that I shall not be able to attend the next meeting of visitors (Oct. 3) at the University. Yet I think there is no one but myself to whom the matters to be acted on are sufficiently known for communication to them. This adds a reason the more for inducing the members to meet at Monticello the day before, which has been heretofore...
Not knowing whether you may have obtained mr Barber’s acceptance in the visit you proposed, I have thought of a proposition which it has been suggested to me would reconcile him to our offer. if therefore he has not accepted that of joining us at the end of his first circuit, and you would approve of giving him a year on his assurance that he will then accept, be so good as to forward him the...
I have no doubt you have recieved, as I have done, a letter from D r Morse with a printed pamphlet, proposing to us a place in a self constituted society for the civilization of the Indians E t c. I am anxious to know your thoughts on the subject because they would affect my confidence in my own. I disapprove the proposition altogether. I acknolege the right of voluntary associations for...
Circular Chancellor Tucker, Mr Barbour, Judge Carr, as you know had declined accepting the law chair of the University, and yesterday I received a letter from Judge Dade finally declining also; Mr Gilmer, our first choice had declined on account of his health, very much deranged by his voyage to Europe. That is now in a great degree reestablished, and he is willing to accept. What shall we do?...
A report to the Governor having been agreed on at our last meeting, and it’s materials being chiefly in my possession, I have presumed to make a draught, and now send it for your consideration. if approved as it is, be so good as to sign it; if any material alteration be thought necessary, if such as not to deface the paper be so good as to make it & sign, if it deface the paper I must request...
Your favor of Mar. 29. did not come to hand until the 4th. instant. Only mr. Cabell, Genl. Cocke and myself attended. Messrs. Johnson and Taylor were retained in Richmond on Lithgow’s case, and Genl. Breckenridge hindered by business. It was not material as there was not a single thing requisite to act on. We have to finish the 4. rows and appendages this summer which will be done and then to...
Our Colleagues on the legislature have called a meeting of the Visitors for the 4th. of March. I presume they have notified you of it by mail, but lest they should not have done so I have thot it safe to inform you. Our newly arrived Professors will come up in the stage of the day after tomorrow. Mr. Cabell writes me that they were much pleased with them in Richmd. We are much so with the two...
I concur with you in the favorable opinion of mr Barber; and altho’ I should prefer Preston, as rather of a more acadamical cast, yet I could readily give a first vote to Barber. his reputn in Congress would be of service. In most public seminaries a text-book is prescribed to the several schools as the Norma docendi in them; and this is frequently done by the Trustees. I should not propose...
By this day’s mail I forward you ⅓ of a parcel of seeds of the Sea-Kale sent here by Genl. Cock for you, mr. Divers & myself. I feared to await a private conveyance because they lose their vegetative power if not planted soon. The day after you left us I was taken with a cholic which attended with a stricture on the upper bowels brought me into great pain & immediate danger. The obstacle was...
The promptitude & success of our subscription paper, now amounting to upwards of 20,000. D. with a prospect much beyond that renders the decision immediately necessary of some important questions which I had thought might have laid over to our periodical meeting the last of September. Having an opportunity of writing to Genl. Cocke, I invited him to join me in a visit to you on Friday the...
I have attentively read your letter to mr. Wheaton on the question whether at the date of the message to Congress, recommending the embargo of 1807 we had knolege of the order of council of Nov. 11. and according to your request I have resorted to my papers, as well as to my memory, for the testimony these might afford, additional to yours. There is no fact in the course of my life which I...
The reciept of the inclosed letter did not give me more pleasure than I feel in communicating it to you. it dispelled the gloom which that from Edinbg had produced and gives me hopes that all will end well. with a good Professor of mod. lang. assured, a good one of ant t languages in view, a prime Mathematician engaged we want really nothing essential but an able Nat. Phil. and that he cannot...
M r Dodge, our Consul at Marseilles, wishing to pay his respects to you on his way to Richm d and apprehending that altho presented to you some half dozen years ago, you may not now recollect him, requests me to give him a line of re-introduction. you will find him a person of very general information and good sense, and particularly familiar with the affairs of Southern Europe. We shall hope...
I now return you the letter from mr. Watson whom I met with on the road as mentioned in mine of the 3d. In consequence of the doubts discovered on the subject of Cooper, I wrote to mr. Cabell, to Correa, and to Cooper himself, and inclose you copies of my letters for perusal that you may see on what ground I place the matter with each. To Cooper I barely hold up the possibility of new views...
I inclose you a long letter from mr. Cabell and a long answer from myself, not much worth reading, but that it is well you should know every thing. No letter from Gilmer since my last, but he is believed to be now in Richmond. Long and Blaettermann are here located in their pavilions as drawn by lot. The former is a fine young man and well qualified. The latter rather a rough looking German,...
I would have accompanied the General to-day but for two reasons, I have not strength, and I should only have added to your embarrasmts. he leaves you Friday morning to partake of a dinner and ball at Fredsbg on Saturday. the miss Wrights are detained here by the sickness of one of them. they go hence to the Natural bridge and return to Washington by Staunton, Winchester & Harper’s ferry. no...
The anxieties expressed in the inclosed letter are pointed to 3. articles. 1. the size of the lecturing rooms. 2. depositories for the Apparatuses. 3. the arrangement of the seats for the Students. 1. if we could have foretold what number of students would come to our University, and what proportion of them would be in attendance on any one Professor at one time, lecturing rooms might have...
The belief is so universal that the ensuing legislature will dispose in some way of the University debt, & liberate our funds, as that we ought to save what time we can by provisional preparations. we have all, I believe, agreed that an Agent to Gr. Britain will be necessary to procure Professors; & I have heretofore mentioned to you that mr Cabell was disposed to undertake the business. but...
I am near closing my catalogue, and it is important I should recieve the kindness of your Theological supplement, by the 1 st or 2 d mail, or it’s insertion will be impracticable. be so good as to expedite it as much as possible. affectionate salutations. DLC : Papers of James Madison.
We are sadly at a loss here for a Palladio . I had three different editions, but they are at Washington , and nobody in this part of the country has one unless you have. if you have you will greatly aid us by letting us have the use of it for a year to come. it will come safely by the stage, and may be left at the stage office of either Milton or Charlottesville , & either postmaster will pay...
In two packages, distinct from this letter, I return you your father ’s meteorological diaries , which you were so kind as to lend me, and a piece on paper money recieved from you some time ago. from the former I have made out tables of rain and snow, and a calendar of animal and vegetable matters announcing the advance of seasons. having now compleated 7. years of observations since my return...
I promised your gardener some seeds which I put under a separate cover and address to you by mail. I also inclose you a letter from mr. Cabell which will shew you that the “sour grapes” of Wm. & Mary are spreading; but certainly not to the “enlightened part of society” as the letter supposes. I have sent him a transcript from our journals that he may see how far we are under engagements to Dr....
I inclose you a letter received last night from mr. Cabell containing interesting information as to our University as well as something further with respect to Dr. Cooper. Be so good as to return it with those formerly sent you. I recieved by the same mail a commission as visitor, and an authentic appointment of the last Monday of this month for our first meeting at the University. I have...
Mr. Dodge, our Consul at Marseilles, wishing to pay his respects to you on his way to Richmd. and apprehending that altho presented to you some half dozen years ago, you may not now recollect him, requests me to give him a line of re-introduction. You will find him a person of very general information and good sense, and particularly familiar with the affairs of Southern Europe. We shall hope...
Considering Chr. Tucker’s acceptance as absolutely desperate, the reasons he assigned being of an immovable character, and the hopeless state in which we should be if Barber also declined I took advge. of his being at our court to ask him to call on me. He did so. I entered with him on the subject of his undertaking our chair of Law. He stiffly maintained at first the preference of his present...
I communicated to you a former part of a correspondence between Judge Johnson of Charleston and my self, chiefly on the practice of caucusing opinions which is that of the supreme court of the US. but on some other matters also, particularly his history of parties. in a late letter he asks me to give him my idea of the precise principles & views of the Republicans in their oppositions to the...
I recieved yesterday from La Fayette a letter confirming his movements as stated in the Enquirer of Friday last. he says he will be here on Thursday next, and expresses his hope to meet you here. I presume you also have heard from him, but hope, at any rate, this will reach you in time to be with us on Wednesday. if mrs Madison will accompany you it will be the more welcome to us all. there is...
I now return you the letter from mr Watson whom I met with on the road as mentioned in mine of the 3 d in consequence of the doubts discovered on the subject of Cooper, I wrote to mr Cabell, to Correa, and to Cooper himself, and inclose you copies of my letters for perusal that you may see on what ground I place the matter with each. to Cooper I barely hold up the possibility of new views from...
I inclose you a letter from mr Cabell and a copy of the bill I prepared and sent him as he requested. I send you also a letter from mr Gilmer, by which he seems determ d not to undertake our professorship. what are we to do? I abhor the idea of a mere Gothic lawyer who has no idea beyond his Coke Littleton, who could not associate in conversation with his Colleagues, nor utter a single...
Our brewing for the use of the present year has been some time over. about the last of Oct. or beginning of Nov. we begin for the ensuing year, and malt and brew 3. 60 gall n casks successively , which will give so many successive lessons to the person you send. on his return he can try his hand with you in order to discover what parts of the processes he will have learnt imperfectly, and come...
The belief is so universal that the ensuing legislature will dispose in some way of the University debt, & liberate our funds, as that we ought to save what time we can by provisional preparations. We have all, I believe, agreed that an Agent to Gr. Britain will be necessary to procure Professors; & I have heretofore mentioned to you that mr. Cabell was disposed to undertake the business. But...
I sincerely congratulate you on your release from incessant labors, corroding anxieties, active enemies & interested friends, & on your return to your books & farm, to tranquility & independance. A day of these is worth ages of the former, but all this you know. Yours of the 10th. was delivered to me yesterday. Mine of the 13th. had been sent off the moment it was written. We are made happy by...