You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • post-Madison Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 51-100 of 160 sorted by date (ascending)
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. we should have recognised the stile even without a signature and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. this is a sample of the effects we...
I return you mr. Coxe’s letter without saying I have read it. I made out enough to see that it was about the Missouri question, and the printed paper told me on which side he was. Could I have devoted a day to it, by interlining the words as I could pick them out, I might have got at more. The lost books of Livy or Tacitus might be worth this. Our friend would do well to write less and write...
I return you mr. Coxe’s letter without saying I have read it. I made out enough to see that it was about the Missouri question, and the printed papers told me on which side he was. could I have devoted a day to it, by interlining the words as I could pick them out, I might have got at more. the last books of Livy or Tacitus might be worth this. our friend would do well to write less and write...
My neighbor, friend and physician, Doctr. Watkins, being called to Philadelphia, is desirous to pay his respects to you en passant, and asks me, by a line to you, to lessen his scruples on doing so. You will find my justification in his character when known to you. His understanding is excellent, well informed, of pleasant conversation and of great worth. As a Physician I should trust myself...
My neighbor, friend and physician, Doct r Watkins, being called to Philadelphia, is desirous to pay his respects to you en passant , and asks me, by a line to you, to lessen his scruples on doing so. you will find my justification in his character when known to you. his understanding is excellent, well informed, of pleasant conversation and of great worth. as a Physician I should trust myself...
The inclosed letter to mr. Cabell so fully explains it’s object, and the grounds on which your signature to the paper is proposed if approved, that I will spare my stiffening & aching wrist the pain of adding more than the assurance of my constant & affectte. friendship. We the subscribers, visitors of the University of Virginia being of opinion that it will be to the interest of that...
The inclosed letter to mr Cabell so fully explains it’s object, and the grounds on which your signature to the paper is proposed if approved, that I will spare my stiffening & aching wrist the pain of adding more than the assurance of my constant & affect te friendship. DNT .
In obedience to the resolution of the visitors of the university at their last session, the Proctor has been constantly employed in “ascertaining the state of accounts under contracts already made, and the expence of compleating the buildings begun and contemplated”: and we have consequently suspended, according to instructions, “the entering into any contracts for the Library until we see...
I have no doubt you have occasionally been led to reflect on the character of the duty imposed by Congress on the importation of books. Some few years ago, when the tariff was before Congress, I engaged some of our members of Congress to endeavor to get the duty repealed, and wrote on the subject to some other acquaintances in Congress, and pressingly to the Secretary of the treasury. The...
I have no doubt you have occasionally been led to reflect on the character of the duty imposed by Congress on the importation of books. some few years ago, when the tariff was before Congress, I engaged some of our members of Congress to endeavor to get the duty repealed, and wrote on the subject to some other acquaintances in Congress, and pressingly to the Secretary of the treasury. the...
Mr Brockenbrough has been closely engaged, since our last meeting in settling the cost of the buildings finished at the University, that we might obtain a more correct view of the state of our funds, and see whether a competency will remain for the Library. He has settled for 6. pavilions, 1. hotel, and 35. dormitories and will proceed with the rest; so that I hope, by our next meeting, the...
I heard in Bedford that you were attaked with the prevailing fever, and with great joy on my return that you were recovered from it. In the strange state of the health of our country every fever gives alarm. I got home from Bedford on the 27th. and am obliged to return there within 3. or 4. days, having an appointment at the Natural bridge on the 11th. prox. As our proposed petition to...
I heard in Bedford that you were attaked with the prevailing fever, and with great joy on my return that you were recovered from it. in the strange state of the health of our country every fever gives alarm. I got home from Bedford on the 27 th and am obliged to return there within 3. or 4. days, having an appointment at the Natural bridge on the 11 th prox. as our proposed petition to...
I have no doubt you have recieved, as I have done, a letter from Dr. Morse with a printed pamphlet, proposing to us a place in a self constituted society for the civilisation of the Indians &c. I am anxious to know your thoughts on the subject because they would affect my confidence in my own. I disapprove the proposition altogether. I acknolege the right of voluntary associations for laudable...
I have no doubt you have recieved, as I have done, a letter from D r Morse with a printed pamphlet, proposing to us a place in a self constituted society for the civilization of the Indians E t c. I am anxious to know your thoughts on the subject because they would affect my confidence in my own. I disapprove the proposition altogether. I acknolege the right of voluntary associations for...
Your favor of Mar. 29. did not come to hand until the 4th. instant. Only mr. Cabell, Genl. Cocke and myself attended. Messrs. Johnson and Taylor were retained in Richmond on Lithgow’s case, and Genl. Breckenridge hindered by business. It was not material as there was not a single thing requisite to act on. We have to finish the 4. rows and appendages this summer which will be done and then to...
Your favor of Mar. 29. did not come to hand until the 4 th instant. only mr Cabell, Gen l Cocke and myself attended. mess rs Johnson and Taylor were retained in Richmond on Lithgow’s case, and Gen l Breckenridge hindered by business. it was not material as there was not a single thing requisite to act on. we have to finish the 4. rows and appendages this summer which will be done and then to...
I thank you for the communication of mr. Rush’s letter which I now return. Mr. Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe just and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. He is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. If however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
I thank you for the communication of mr Rush’s letter which I now return. mr Bentham’s character of Alexander is I believe unjust and that worse traits might still be added to it equally just. he is now certainly become the watchman of tyranny for Europe, as dear to it’s oppressors as detestable to the oppressed. if however he should engage in war with the Turks, as I expect, his employment...
The person who hands you this letter is an interesting subject of curiosity. He was taken prisoner by the Kickapoos when he supposes he must have been about 3. or 4. years of age, knows not whence taken nor who were his parents. He escaped from the Indians at about 19. as he supposes, & about 7. years ago. He has applied himself to education, is a student of Medecine, & has assumed the name of...
The person who hands you this letter is an interesting subject of curiosity. he was taken prisoner by the Kickapoos when he supposes he must have been about 3. or 4. years of age, knows not whence taken, nor who were his parents. he escaped from the Indians at about 19. as he supposes, & about 7. years ago. he has applied himself to education, is a student of Medecine, & has assumed the name...
I send you a mass of reading, and so rapidly does my hand fail me in writing that I can give but very briefly the necessary explanations. You will observe that mr. Cabell, if the loan bill should pass, proposes to come up with mr. Loyall, probably mr. Johnson, and Genl. Cocke to have a special meeting. This is necessary to engage our workmen before they undertake other work for the ensuing...
I send you a mass of reading, and so rapidly does my hand fail me in writing that I can give but very briefly the necessary explanations. 1. mr Cabell’s letter to me & mine to him which passed each other on the road will give you the state of things respecting the University, and I am happy to add that letters recieved from Appleton give us reason to expect our capitels by the first vessel...
You already know that the legislature has authorised the literary board to lend us another 60.000 D. It is necessary we should act on this immediately so far as to accept the loan, that we may engage our workmen before they enter into other undertakings for the season. But the badness of the roads, the uncertainty of the weather and the personal inconvenience of a journey to the members of our...
You already know that the legislature has authorised the literary board to lend us another 60,000 D. it is necessary we should act on this immediately so far as to accept the loan, that we may engage our workmen before they enter into other undertakings for the season. but the badness of the roads, the uncertainty of the weather, and the personal inconvenience of a journey to the members of...
I have read mr. Cox’s letters and some of his papers, which I now return you. It is impossible for me to write to him. With two crippled hands I abandon writing but from the most urgent necessities; and above all things I should not meddle in a Presidential election, nor even express a sentiment on the subject of the Candidates. As you propose to write to him, will you be so good as to add a...
I have read mr Cox’s letters and some of his papers, which I now return you. it is impossible for me to write to him. with two crippled hands I abandon writing but from the most urgent necessities; and above all things I should not meddle in a Presidential election, nor even express a sentiment on the subject of the Candidates. as you propose to write to him, will you be so good as to add a...
Having received from all our brethren approbations of the loan, I authorised Mr Brockenbrough to engage the work of the Rotunda and have it commenced immediately. We had only two bricklayers and two carpenters capable of executing it with solidity and correctness, these had not capital sufficient for so great an undertaking, nor would they have risked their little all but for a great advance...
The inclosed lre. in Gr. Lat. Fr. and Eng. with it’s accompaniments being intended for your inspection as much as mine, is now forwarded for your perusal. You will be so good as to reinclose them that I may return them to the writer. The answer I propose to give is, what I have given on all similar applications, that until the debt of the University is discharged, and it’s funds liberated, the...
The inclosed lre in Gr. Lat. Fr. and Eng. with it’s accompaniments being intended for your inspection as much as mine, is now forwarded for your perusal. you will be so good as to reinclose them that I may return them to the writer. the answer I propose to give is, what I have given on all similar applications, that until the debt of the University is discharged, and it’s funds liberated, the...
Mr. Dodge, our Consul at Marseilles, wishing to pay his respects to you on his way to Richmd. and apprehending that altho presented to you some half dozen years ago, you may not now recollect him, requests me to give him a line of re-introduction. You will find him a person of very general information and good sense, and particularly familiar with the affairs of Southern Europe. We shall hope...
M r Dodge, our Consul at Marseilles, wishing to pay his respects to you on his way to Richm d and apprehending that altho presented to you some half dozen years ago, you may not now recollect him, requests me to give him a line of re-introduction. you will find him a person of very general information and good sense, and particularly familiar with the affairs of Southern Europe. We shall hope...
The anxieties expressed in the inclosed letter are pointed to 3. articles. 1. the size of the lecturing rooms. 2. depositories for the Apparatuses. 3. the arrangement of the seats for the Students. 1. If we could have foretold what number of students would come to our University, and what proportion of them would be in attendance on any one Professor at one time, lecturing rooms might have...
The anxieties expressed in the inclosed letter are pointed to 3. articles. 1. the size of the lecturing rooms. 2. depositories for the Apparatuses. 3. the arrangement of the seats for the Students. 1. if we could have foretold what number of students would come to our University, and what proportion of them would be in attendance on any one Professor at one time, lecturing rooms might have...
I communicated to you a former part of a correspondence between Judge Johnson of Charleston and myself, chiefly on the practice of caucusing opinions which is that of the supreme court of the US. but on some other matters also, particularly his history of parties. In a late letter he asks me to give him my idea of the precise principles & views of the Republicans in their oppositions to the...
I communicated to you a former part of a correspondence between Judge Johnson of Charleston and my self, chiefly on the practice of caucusing opinions which is that of the supreme court of the US. but on some other matters also, particularly his history of parties. in a late letter he asks me to give him my idea of the precise principles & views of the Republicans in their oppositions to the...
I recieved the inclosed letters from the President with a request that after perusal, I would forward them to you, for perusal by yourself also and to be returned then to him. You have doubtless seen Timothy Pickering’s 4th. of July Observations on the Declaration of Independance. If his principles and prejudices personal and political, gave us no reason to doubt whether he had truly quoted...
I recieved the inclosed letters from the President with a request that after perusal, I would forward them to you, for perusal by yourself also and to be returned then to him. You have doubtless seen Timothy Pickering’s 4 th of July Observations on the Declaration of Independance. if his principles and prejudices personal and political, gave us no reason to doubt whether he had truly quoted...
I return you mr. Coxe’s letter which has cost me much time at two or three different attempts to decypher it. Had I such a correspondent I should certainly admonish him that if he would not so far respect my time as to write to me legibly, I should so far respect it myself as not to waste it in decomposing and recomposing his hieroglyphics. The jarrings between the friends of Hamilton and...
I return you mr Coxe’s letter which has cost me much time at two or three different attempts to decypher it. had I such a correspondent I should certainly admonish him that if he would not so far respect my time as to write to me legibly, I should so far respect it myself as not to waste it in decomposing and recomposing his hieroglyphics. The jarrings between the friends of Hamilton and...
I forward you two most important letters sent to me by the President and add his letter to me by which you will percieve his primâ facie views. This you will be so good as to return to me, and forward the others to him. I have recieved Trumbull’s print of the Decln. of Independance, & turning to his letter am able to inform you more certainly than I could by memory that the print costs 20. D....
I forward you two most imporant letters sent to me by the President and add his letter to me by which you will percieve his primâ facie views. this you will be so good as to return to me, and forward the others to him I have recieved Trumbull’s print of the Decln of Independance, & turning to his letter am able to inform you more certainly than I could by memory that the print costs 20. D. &...
The belief is so universal that the ensuing legislature will dispose in some way of the University debt, & liberate our funds, as that we ought to save what time we can by provisional preparations. We have all, I believe, agreed that an Agent to Gr. Britain will be necessary to procure Professors; & I have heretofore mentioned to you that mr. Cabell was disposed to undertake the business. But...
The belief is so universal that the ensuing legislature will dispose in some way of the University debt, & liberate our funds, as that we ought to save what time we can by provisional preparations. we have all, I believe, agreed that an Agent to Gr. Britain will be necessary to procure Professors; & I have heretofore mentioned to you that mr Cabell was disposed to undertake the business. but...
I return your letter to the President, and that of mr. Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. The matters which mr. Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. But that about the navigation of the St. Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. The navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
I return your letter to the President, and that of mr Rush to you, with thanks for the communication. the matters which mr Rush states as under consideration with the British government are very interesting. but that about the navigation of the S t Laurence and the Missisipi, I would rather they would let alone. the navigation of the former, since the N.Y. canal, is of too little interest to...
I send you two letters of Dr. Cooper for perusal. Altho’ the trustees of that College and the Legislature have supported him most triumphantly against his clerical persecutors, yet it is evident he does not feel himself secure. I think you will see from these letters that he keeps us in his eye. And altho’ I doubt, were he now offered a place here, whether he would think he could accept it...
I send you two letters of D r Cooper for perusal. altho’ the trustees of that College and the Legislature have supported him most triumphantly against his clerical persecutors, yet it is evident he does not feel himself secure. I think you will see from these letters that he keeps us in his eye. and altho’ I doubt, were he now offered a place here, whether he would think he could accept it...
Circular Notwithstanding the reduction which was made in the rents proposed, it appears that that on the salaries will so much enlarge our surplus, that we may very safely engage 8. professors, and still have a surplus this year of 6000. D. and annually after of 5024 D. The opportunity of procuring the anatomical professor is so advantageous, that I propose to make the provisional instruction...
You will see by the inclosed letter from mr. Cabell that a project is in agitation respecting Wm. & Mary Coll. which gives him much alarm. I communicate to you the letter as he requests, and with it my answer, as shewing the point in which I view it. I will ask their return when read, that I may be enabled to lodge my answer in Richmd. before his arrival there. On the question of engaging a...