You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 409 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I send you a letter of Short’s for perusal, & one of Edgar Patterson asking what is already I presume provided for. One of General Armstrong which I do not well understand because I do not recollect the particular letter which came by Haley. I presume the counsel he refers to is to take possession of the Floridas. This letter of June 15. is written after the cession by Carlos to Bonaparte of...
Th: Jefferson presents his affectionate salutations to mr Madison & sends him the inclosed which will explain itself. he hopes to see him & family at Monticello when most convenient to themselves; and observes for his information that the road through Shadwell is put into fine order, the right hand at issuing from the ford on this side to be greatly preferred to the left. the road by Milton is...
The road through Ravensworth is rendered absolutely impassable for a four wheeled carriage by a single change made lately by one of the mr Fitzhughs in his plantation. you must not therefore attempt it, but go on to Fairfax C.H. & there turn off to Songster’s. Bull run is now passed at an excellent ford, and the hills by a great deal of work have been made quite good. the road between Elkrun...
Yours by yesterday’s post has been recieved, & I now return you the letters of Yznardi, Wilkinson, Cathcart, Clinton, Toulman & Turreau. In the answer to the latter I think it would be better to lay more stress on the constitutional bar to our furnishing the money, because it could apply on an occasion of peace as well as war. I submit to you therefore the striking out the words ’It is not Etc...
I inclose you Clarke’s memoranda. The following articles seem proper for Executive attention. An instrument vesting in the Collector of Natchez the powers of the Administrator, Treasurer & Contador. Instructions to Claiborne to suppress useless offices to remove any existing officers. to appoint others. It would be well these could go by next post. Would it not be well to send in what...
I left at Washington a great coat of which I shall have great need. should this reach you before your departure I will thank you to bring it; and it will be in time if I recieve it when you come to Monticello yourself, as it will be on my return only that it will be wanting. I have written to mr Lemaire to deliver it to you. the drought in this quarter is excessive. it begins about the...
I return you the papers which accompanied yours of yesterday. I think the case of Capt Hewes is merely a case for a demand of indemnification from Gr. Br. and a proper acknolegement of the violation of jurisdiction. It would be a very dangerous precedent for Congress to indemnify the individual. I think it would be well for Smith to be furnished with the declaration of Mr. Canning only taking...
It was agreed yesterday 1. that a copy of the proclamation should be inclosed to each member in a letter from the Secy. of state, mentioning that the meeting of Congress had been necessarily anticipated three weeks, because the ratificns of the treaty & conventions for the cession of Louisiana were to be exchanged on the 30th. day of October, & suggesting the importance of a punctual...
I now return you the papers reserved from the last post. our regular answer to mr Livingston may well be that the Attorney General having given an official opinion that the right to the batture is in the US. and the matter being now referred to Congress, it is our duty to keep the grounds clear of any adversary possession until the legislature shall decide on it. I have carefully read mr....
Notes on the British claims in the Missipi territory. 1803. Mar. 3. act of Congress gave to Mar. 31. 1804 to exhibit their claims or grants 1804. Mar. 27 do. gave to Nov. 30. 1804. & allowed transcripts instead of originals Etc. 1805. Mar. 2. do. gave to Dec. 1. 1805 to file their grants. & in fact to Jan. 1. 1807. time when the sale might begin. 1807. Dec. 15. the British claimants...
Yours of the 20th. came to hand last night. I sincerely regret that mrs Madison is not likely to be able to come on so soon as had been hoped. the probability of an extensive war on the continent of Europe strengthening every day for some time past, is now almost certain. this gives us our great desideratum, time. in truth it places us quite at our ease. we are certain of one year of...
I now return you the papers forwarded by the merchants of Philadelphia and Boston on the subject of the wrongs they complain of at Buenos Ayres. I observe that they have not gone into a developement of the subject. Two or three cases are opened with some degree of detail; as to the rest we have only a list of the ships for which our interference is claimed. But in cases where a hair’s breadth...
I shall be with you on the 25th. unless health or weather prevent. But if you propose leaving home sooner for Washington, do not let my coming prevent you. Only, in that case, if convenient, lodge word at Gordon’s, or write me by next post, that you will be gone; as I should then wish to lengthen my day’s journey. I have not been able to look yet into my newspapers, but I presume yours contain...
The post having made it night before his arrival yesterday and my mail extraordinarily voluminous, I have been able to read & now return you the inclosed papers only. mr Livingston’s shall come by the next mail. I do not like this mistake of Capt Mc.Niel’s, and fear it will be very embarrassing. other dispatches oblige me to close here with assurances of my affectionate esteem & respect. PrC (...
Will you consider whether a copy of the inclosed sent to each head of department would be best, or to avail myself of your kind offer to speak to them. my only fear as to the latter is that they might infer a want of confidence on my part. but you can decide on sounder views of the subject than my position may admit. [if] you prefer the letter, modify any expressions which you may think need...
Yours of the 20. & 21. were recieved yesterday. I have sent on the letter to Turreau without alteration. it was as little as either the stile or matter of his letter deserved.    I shall be with you probably on Wednesday. mr Barlow stays with us till then, & returns at the same time. The bearer is mr Chisolm the bricklayer who wished to see you before your departure. Dinsmore has suggested a...
Your two favors of the 25th. & blank were recieved yesterday; and all the papers forwarded me are returned by this post. I must pray you to direct an extract from so much of mr. Clarke’s letter as relates to the dissatisfaction of the Chickasaw chief with the Spanish governor, to be taken & sent to Genl. Dearborn to whom I have written on the subject. Mr. Clarke’s letter cuts out a...
By the last post I recieved & forwarded your letter to Duane, in which there was nothing but what was safe and proper. Duane is honest, & well intentioned, but over zealous. These qualities harmonise with him a great portion of the republican body. He deserves therefore all the just & favorable attentions which can properly be shewn him. By the same post I recieve from the collector of Norfolk...
Mr. Rodney not being at Washington I send you the inclosed because it requires to be acted on immediately. I remember it was concluded that witnesses who should be brought from great distances, and carried from one scene of trial to another must have a reasonable allowance made for their expences & the money advanced. I expect it will be thought proper that the witnesses proving White’s...
I think the District atty of N.Y. should be immediately instructed to investigate the expedition of the Leander, & of every person concerned in it; and to learn how it has happened that the officers of the government at that place should have paid no attention & given no information of it while going on. on the report of the Atty to us we may decide what shall be done. DNA : RG...
Yours of the 17th. came to hand yesterday. I wrote to Mr. Gallatin that the principle to govern our indulgencies of vessels to foreign ministers, was that it was fair to let them send home all their subjects caught here by the embargo & having no other means of getting home, proportioning the tonnage permitted to the number of persons according to the rules in the transport service; and that...
Yours by yesterday’s post is recieved. the letter to Higginson & others is entirely approved, and is sealed & forwarded to mr Brent. the Consulate at Nantes must be disposed of according to our former arrangement. I do not know whether the mr Lynch recommended is the one who was living at Nantes when I was in France, or his son. of that one there is something not favourable resting in my mind,...
To compleat the roll of governmental officers on the plan inclosed will give the departments some serious trouble: however it is so importan⟨t⟩ to present to the eye of all the constituted authorities, as well as of their constituents, & to keep under their eye, the true extent of the machine of government, that I cannot but recommend to the heads of departments to endeavor to fill up, each,...
I pray you to peruse & consider the inclosed letter of Governor Cabell and my answer, and to exercise over the latter the same discretion I have confided to Genl. Dearborne; returning it to me for any material correction, or forwarding it to the General if you think it will do, and by the same post, as it goes so circuitously. I suspect your difficulty with the mail lock proceeded as it did at...
I am still here. Three refusals of the Naval Secretaryship have been re[c]ieved, and I am afraid of recieving a 4th. this evening from mr. Jones of Phila. In that case Genl. Smith has agreed to take it pro tempore, so as to give me time; and I hope the moment it is in either his or Jones’s hands, to get away; but this may be yet three four or five days. Lincoln is doing the duties of your...
Our postrider having mistaken his day, brought us no mail on Thursday last. Yesterday I recieved a double one. In it were the inclosed letters. Those from Dupont & Granger are forwarded for your perusal, and I will recieve them again when I see you at your own house. The one from Dallas to yourself on Jackson’s case I recieved from mr. Brent: the recommendation of the Attorney of the district,...
In a conversation with mr. Granger not long before we left Washington he mentioned that he was about to establish a post line from Natchez to New Orleans, and must place an office at Baton rouge. I told him that that should have good previous consideration in the present jealous state of the Spanish officers; that perhaps they might even stop our mail carrier. I heard no more of it till last...
The following Commissions to be made out. Lemuel Trescott of Massachusets Collector of the district, & Inspector of the revenue for the port of Machias. Jonathan Palmer of Connecticut Surveyor of the port of Stonington, & Inspector of the revenue for the same. John Vemor junr. Surveyor of the port of Albany & Inspector of the revenue for the same. Robert Cockran of N. Carolina Collector for...
Will you be so good as once more to revise this? altho’ I have not entirely obliterated all the passages which have been thought objectionable, yet I have very much reduced & smoothed them. still verbal & minor corrections of style or sentiment will be thankfully recieved & made. RC ( ViU ); undated, but perhaps written after TJ saw Gallatin’s remarks and made changes to the early draft....
Your’s by the last post was recieved yesterday, and I now return Monroe’s letters. that Armstrong should be returning so suddenly & without notice is quite an impossibility. any other hypothesis for his journey to Amsterdam would be more probable. I send you a letter from Pierpoint Edwards respecting Swartwout: his testimony against him cannot be suspected, considering their mutual relation to...
Yours of the 30th. I recieved yesterday, and now return the papers from Cathcart, Sullivan, De Ponceau, Ramage, Barnet, Merry, & that concerning Lewis. in a former letter I had suggested to you the waiting to arrest Lewis in some other state (for I believe that such an offence may be tried any where) but considering the change of the Marshall it is possible a fair jury may be obtained now in...
A person of the name of Thompson, of Amherst county in Virginia has asked my interference for the recovery of his son John Thompson understood to be impressed on board the Squirrel a British vessel of war. The inclosed letter gave him the first information he has recieved from him for some time past, for so long a time indeed that he had apprehended he was dead. He thinks the letter not...
I return you the papers on Clarke’s claim, which indeed I have not considered with all the attention which should be done were this an ultimate decision but my first impression is that the claim ought to be rejected. It is clearly a claim for money, not for land. The Commrs. of N.Y. were constituted a special court of justice to distribute the 30,000. D. of Vermont according to right, & they...
The extract of a letter to Bishop Carroll I have inclosed to Genl. Dearborne. I return you judge Davies’s letter. if we meddle in the case at all, should it not be by sending the letter to the Attorney General who will know best how to prevent a conflict of jurisdictions. I inclose you the copy of a letter from Genl. Smith to mr Gallatin, communicated by the Generel to P. Carr & by him to me....
Mr. Smith’s letter of Aug. 29. & the papers it inclosed, and which are now reinclosed, will explain to you the necessity of my confirming his proposition as to the means of apprising our East India commerce of their danger, without waiting for further opinions on the subject. you will see that it throws on you the immediate burthen of giving the necessary instructions with as little delay as...
I now return you the letters of mr Pichon, and of Jones; also those of Van Polanen & Thos. Sumter . the letter to be written to Van Polanen should be so friendly as to remove all doubt from the Batavian government that our suppression of that mission proceeds from any other motive than of domestic arrangement & economy. —I inclose you a draught of a letter to the emperor of Marocco, which make...
The inclosed reclamations of Girod & Chote against the claims of Bapstropp to a monopoly of the Indian commerce supposed to be under the protection of the 3d article of the Louisiana convention, as well as some other claims to abusive grants, will probably force us to meet that question. The article has been worded with remarkeable caution on the part of our negociators. It is that the...
I observe a great number of contracts for carrying the mails are advertised to be made within a short time hence, & for 4. years. I suppose the principal reason for making such long contracts is the trouble which would be so often recurring to the post office, if they were shorter. This should have it’s just weight: but it may be doubted whether contracts for so long a time as 4. years do not...
Yours of the 7th. was recieved yesterday, but the post was so late, and arriving with his portmanteau open threw me into great alarm, as I expected a large sum of money in the mail. I was relieved by finding it safe. I return you Pinckney’s, Joy’s, Claiborne’s, Foronda’s and Bailey’s letters. Would it not be worth while to send Erskine a copy of Bailey’s letter, to observe to him that this...
Your’s of the 10th. came to hand yesterday & I return you Foronda’s, Tufts, Soderstrom’s & Turreau’s letters. I think it is become necessary to let Turreau understand explicitly that the vessels we permit foreign ministers to send away are merely transports for the conveyance of such of their subjects as were here at the time of the embargo, that the numbers must be proportioned to the vessels...
Yours of the 30th. I recieved yesterday, and now return the papers from Cathcart, Sullivan, De Ponceau, Ramage, Barnet, Merry, & that concerning Lewis. In a former letter I had suggested to you the waiting to arrest Lewis in some other state (for I believe that such an offence may be tried any where) but considering the change of the Marshall it is possible a fair jury may be obtained now in...
I return you the petition of Samuel Miller with the pardon signed. mr Kelty had spoke to me on this subject and told me that he and mr Craunch should join in a recommendation . I wish mr Wagner would obtain this before he delivers the pardon. I return also mr King’s letter which has really important matter, especially what respects the Mare clausum , the abandonment of the colonial system , &...
We did not collect the sense of our brethren the other day by regular questions, but as far as I could understand from what was said it appeared to be 1. that an acknolegement of our right to the Perdido is a sine quo non, and no price to be given for it. 2. no absolute & perpetual relinquishment of right is to be made of the country East of the Rio bravo del Norte, even in exchange for...
Commissions to be made out: Thomas Rodney of Delaware to be judge of Missipi. vice S. Lewis Thomas Rodney of Delaware } to be Commnrs. &c West of Pearl river. Robert Williams of N. Carolina Ephraim Kerby of Connecticut } to be Commnrs. &c East of Pearl river. Robert Carter Nicholas of Kentucky a blank commission for the Register East of Pearl river. Tenche Coxe of Pensylvania to be Purveyor....
The only questions which press on the Executive for decision are Whether we shall enter into a provisional alliance with England to come into force only in the event that during the present war we become engaged in war with France ? leaving the declaration of the casus federis ultimately to us. Whether we shall send away Yrujo, Casacalvo, Morales? Whether we shall instruct Bowdoin not to go to...
I think with you we had better send to Algiers some of the losing articles in order to secure peace there while it is uncertain elsewhere. While war with England is probable every thing leading to it with any other nation should be avoided, except with Spain. As to her, I think it the precise moment when we should declare to the French government that we will instantly seise on the Floridas as...
I suppose we must dispatch another packet, by the 1st. of Apr. at farthest. I take it to be an universal opinion that war will become preferable to a continuance of the embargo after a certain time. Should we not then avail ourselves of the intervening period to procure a retraction of the obnoxious decrees peaceably if possible? An opening is given us by both parties sufficient to form a...
I recieved yesterday your two letters without date on the subjects now to be answered. I do not see any objection to the appointment of Mr. Cocke as Agent at Martinique. That of the Consul at Mogadore is on more difficult ground. A Consul in Barbary is a diplomatic character, altho’ the title does not imply that. He recieves a salary fixed by the legislature; being independant of Simpson we...
Of the papers I recieved from you yesterday I have sent Mr. Graham’s letter (in favor of R. Brent as paymaster) to Genl. Dearborne, and that of the Lowries to Mr. Gallatin for information. All the rest are now returned. On some of them I will make short observations merely for your consideration and determination. Rademaker & Hills: I really think the good which may result from permitting...
I inclose you Clarke’s memoranda. the following articles seem proper for Executive attention. an instrument vesting in the Collector of Natchez the powers of the administrator, Treasurer & Contador. Instructions to Claiborne to suppress useless offices to remove any existing officers. to appoint others it would be well these could go by next post. would it not be well to send in what documents...