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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jay, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jay, John"
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We received by the last Packet the favor of your letter of Jan ry. 14. in which we have the agreeable information of your having accepted the appointment of Secretary for foreign Affairs. Besides the general interest we feel in this event as members of the Union which is to availed of your services, we are particularly happy that a channel of communication is opened for us with Congress in...
Soon after the arrival of M r. Jefferson in London, We had a conference with the Ambassador of Tripoli, at His House. The amount of all the Information we could obtain from him was that a perpetual peace was in all respects the most adviseable, because a temporary treaty would leave room for increasing demands upon every renewal of it and a stipulation for annual payments, would be liable to...
Soon after our meeting together in London, We had a Conference with the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs in which we communicated to him, the joint Commission of Congress for negotiating a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain, and left an attested Copy of it in the Hands of his Lordship. at the same time His Lordship was informed that as the Commission was limited to two years duration,...
I am honoured with your favor of June 19. informing me that permission is given me to make a short visit to my native country, for which indulgence I beg leave to return my thanks to the President, and to yourself, Sir, for the expedition with which you were so good as to forward it after it was obtained. Being advised that October is the best month of the autumn for a passage to America, I...
Our delegates by the last post informed us that we might now obtain blank letters of marque for want of which our people have long and exceedingly suffered. I have taken the liberty therefore of desiring them to apply for fifty, and transmit them by a safe conveyance. The inclosed order being in it’s nature important and generally interesting, I thought it my duty to lay it before Congress as...
The various calamities which during the present year have befallen our crops of wheat, have reduced them so very low as to leave us little more than seed for the ensuing year, were it to be solely applied to that purpose. This country is therefore unable to furnish the necessary supplies of flour for the Convention troops, without lessening by so much as should be purchased, the sowing for...
The bearer hereof Colo. James Monroe who served some time as an officer in the American army and as such distinguished himself in the affair of Princetown as well as on other occasions, having resumed his studies, comes to Europe to complete them. Being a citizen of this state, of abilities, merit and fortune, and my particular friend, I take the liberty of making him known to you, that should...
Having arrived here a few days ago in order to proceed to Europe, I had hoped to have been able to accompany the Generals Rochambaud and Chastellux, the latter of whom is so kind as to undertake the delivery of this. But their vessel sails before I can be ready. I shall follow however in a very few days and may perhaps have the pleasure of being with you as soon as this will. Had I joined you...
In a letter which I did myself the honor of writing you by the Chevalr. de Chastellux I informed you of my being at this place with an intention of joining you in Paris. But the uncommon vigilance of the enemy’s cruisers immediately after the departure of the French fleet deterred every vessel from attempting to go out. The arrival of the preliminaries soon after shewed the impropriety of my...
[ Paris, 9 Feb. 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “John Jay. The Marq. Fay. gives us hopes he will accept Sec. F. A.—war and peace doubtful—Bav. and Austr. neth.—Prussia and Dantzic settled—distractions of Holld. continue. Hastings and E.I. affairs difficult for Brit. parliament—have forgot us—we must urge them as to separate articles—expect by packet which sails in Feb. to receive orders about...