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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Humphreys, David

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I find on my arrival here that there is no vessel going for France from any Eastern port. There is a new brig of Mr. Tracy’s which sails for London in about ten days; but besides the objection to the place of her destination, another arises to that crowd of passengers to which we should be exposed in merchant ships without corresponding accomodations. I here learn that the French packet sails...
I mentioned in my letter to you that there was one circumstance which might induce me to take my passage from hence in a ship of Mr. Tracy’s. This was the obtaining a tolerable probability of being set ashore on the coast of France. Since my return from Portsmouth (which was the night before last) I have seen Mr. Tracy, and I think the probability of being landed at Brest, tho’ his ship goes...
A letter which I wrote you by express to bring you on here will have informed you of the circumstances which have occasioned me to sail from hence. A tissu of unfortunate events has deprived me of the pleasure of your company. We have waited till this moment in expectation of your joining us, but the return of the express now informs us you had left New-haven and therefore we sail in the...
I inclose you a letter from Gatteaux observing that there will be an anachronism, if, in making a medal to commemorate the victory of Saratoga, he puts on General Gates the insignia of the Cincinnati which did not exist at that date. I wrote him in answer that I thought so too: but that you had the direction of that business, that you were now in London, that I would write to you and probably...
Your letter on the subject of the medals came duly to hand, but the workman has not applied to me since as I expected, and, if I ever had his address, I have mislaid it, so that I cannot send to him. However I am not afraid that any thing is going wrong, as I had desired him to leave the part in question for the last. I inclose you two letters which have lately come to hand for you. Our town...
I have been honoured with your letter in which you mention to me your intention of returning to America in the April packet. It is with sincere concern that I meet this event, as it deprives me not only of your aid in the office in which we have been joined, but also of your society which has been to me a source of the most real satisfaction. I think myself bound to return you my thanks for...
My stay in London having been considerably longer than I had expected, I did not arrive in this place till the last day of April. I found here your kind letter of the 4th. of that month acknoleging much more than they deserved, my little attentions to you. Their only merit was their being faithful testimonies of a sincere regard for you. The obligations have in fact been on my side, and I...
I wrote you on the 7th. of May, being immediately on my return from England; and have lately received your favor of June 5. and thank you for the intelligence it contains. Every circumstance we hear induces us to beleive that it is the want of will, rather than of ability, to furnish contributions which keeps the public treasury so poor. The Algerines will probably do us the favour to produce...
I remember when you left us, it was with a promise to supply all the defects of correspondence in our friends, of which we complained, and which you had felt in common with us. Yet I have received but one letter from you which was dated June 5. 1786. and I answered it Aug. 14. 1786. Dropping that however and beginning a new account, I will observe to you that wonderful improvements are making...
Your favor of Nov. 29. 1788. came to hand the last month. How it happened that mine of Aug. 1787. was fourteen months on it’s way is inconceivable. I do not recollect by what conveyance I sent it. I had concluded however either that it had miscarried or that you had become indolent as most of our countrymen are in matters of correspondence. The change in this country, since you left it, is...
The President having thought proper to confide several special matters in Europe to your care, it will be expedient that you take your passage in the first convenient vessel bound to the port of London. When there you will be pleased to deliver to Mr. G. Morris and to Mr. Johnson the letters and papers you will have in charge for them, to communicate to us from thence any interesting public...
Your letters No. 1. to 6. from England, No. 7. 8. from Lisbon and No. 9. from Madrid are all recieved. The President has nominated you minister Resident for the U. S. of America at the court of Lisbon, which was approved by the Senate. You will consequently recieve herewith your Commission, a letter of credence to the Queen, sealed, and an open copy of it for your own information, and a letter...
I wrote you Mar. 15. with postscripts of the 18th. and 19th. Since that yours of Jan. 3. No. 10. Jan. 15. No. 11. from Madrid, and Feb. 6. No. 12. and Feb. 12. No. 13. from Lisbon are received. They covered a letter from Mr. Carmichael, the only one we have from him of a later date than May 1789. You know that my letter to him, of which you were the bearer, took notice of the intermission of...
There has been published at Madrid, by some bishop who had been to Mexico, and found there an original collection of the letters of Cortez, a book containing those letters. I do not know how it happened that I did not ask the favor of you to procure this book for me. I now supply the omission, and add a request to procure also la historia del Amirante D. Christoval Colomb by Fernando Colomb,...
The bearer hereof Mr. John Wilcocks junr. having in contemplation to visit different Countries of Europe, and perhaps that of your Residence, with a view to commercial arrangements, I take the liberty of informing you that he is a citizen of the United States, son of Mr. Wilcocks the Recorder of Pennsylvania, and of a respectable character. As such I beg leave to make him known to you, and to...
Mr. Thomas Barclay is appointed by the President of the United States to go to Morocco in the Character of Consul for the Purpose of obtaining from the new Emperor a Recognition of our Treaty with his Father. Ten thousand dollars are appropriated for Presents in such Form and to such Persons as Mr. Barclay in his Discretion shall think best; and he is to receive for himself at the rate of Two...
My last letters to you have been of Apr. 11. and May 13 and I am now to acknowlege the receipt of yours of Mar. 6. No. 13. for 14. Mar. 31. No. 15. Apr. 8. No. 16. Apr. 30. No. 17. May 3. No. 18. As yet no native candidate, such altogether as we would wish, has offered for the Consulate of Lisbon, and as it is a distinguished place in our commerce, we are somewhat more difficult in that than...
Mr. Barclay having been detained longer than was expected, you will receive this, as well as my Letter of May 13th. from him. Since the date of that I have received your No. 15 March 31, No. 16 April 8, No. 17 April 30, No. 18 May 3, and No. 20. May 21. You are not unacquainted with the situation of our Captives at Algiers. Measures were taken, and were long depending, for their redemption....
Mr. Robert Morris this moment informs me that a person of the name of William Duncan, formerly of this state, sailed from hence about the year 1785, and has never been since heard of till lately that his mother has been informed by some one, who says he has been at Algiers, that this Wm. Duncan is there in captivity. I am therefore to ask the favour of you to take the first opportunity of...
I recieved yesterday your favors of June 7. No. 21. and June 17. No. 22. Mr. Barclay will have delivered you my two letters of May 13. and July 13. Since his departure no remarkeable events have taken place. He would convey to you the official information of General Scott’s success against the Indians. A second party somewhat stronger is now gone against them. Nearly the whole of the states...
My last to you was of Aug. 23. acknoleging the reciept of your Nos. 19. 21. and 22. Since that I have recieved from 23. to 33. inclusive. In mine I informed you I was about setting out for Virginia and consequently should not write to you till my return. This opportunity by Capt. Wicks is the first since my return. The party which had gone at the date of my last, against the Indians North of...
I enclose you the copy of a Letter received from Don Joseph de Viar one of his Catholic Majesty’s commissioners here, stating the claim of Don Joseph Torino for a sum of money paid by the Count de Espilles for our captives at Algiers, and on account of our Commissioner Mr. Lamb who was sent there. You will be pleased to consider this as a part of the debt, which in my letter of July 13th. of...
My last to you were of the 29th. of Nov. and 13th. of Dec. I have now to acknoledge the receipt of your Nos. 34. to 44. inclusive. The river here and at New York having remained longer blocked with ice than has been usual, has occasioned a longer interval than usual between my letters. I am particularly to acknolege that Mr. Barclay’s receipt of draughts from you on our bankers in Holland for...
We have been very long indeed without any vessel going from this port to Lisbon. This is the reason why I have been so long without acknoleging the receipt of your letters. Your Nos. from 45. to 53. inclusive are received except No. 52. not yet come to hand. The President set out yesterday for Virginia, and I shall follow him tomorrow. During my absence the public papers will be forwarded to...
We have never known so long an interval during which there has not been a single vessel going to Lisbon. Hence it is that I am so late in acknoleging the receipt of your letters from No. 54. to 58. inclusive, and that I am obliged to do it by the way of London, and consequently cannot send you the newspapers as usual. The summer has been chiefly past in endeavoring to bring the North-Western...
You were not unapprised of the reluctance with which I came into my present office, and I came into it with a determination to quit it as soon as decency would permit. Nor was it long before I fixed on the termination of our first federal cycle of 4. years as the proper moment. That moment is now approaching, and is to me as land was to Columbus in his first American voyage. The object of this...
My last to you was of the 6th. of November, since which the papers have been duly forwarded to you by every opportunity from my office, as Mr. Taylor assures me, to whom I am obliged to confide that duty. Your last received was No. 59. as acknoleged in mine. With the present you will recieve newspapers for yourself, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. Short whom we expect by this time to be at Madrid: also...
The deaths of Admiral Paul Jones first, and afterwards of Mr. Barclay, to whom the mission to Algiers explained in the enclosed papers was successively confided, have led the President to desire you to undertake the execution of it in person. These papers, being copies of what had been delivered to them will serve as your guide. But Mr. Barclay having been also charged with a mission to...
I have to acknolege the receipt of your letters from No. 60. to No. 67. inclusive. You cannot be too vigilant against any such treaty as that mentioned in No. 60. which by giving the exclusive supply of wheat to Naples, would altogether debar the US. from it. This would bear so hard on us, that not only an exclusion of their wines from the US. ought to be expected on their part, but every...
I thank you sincerely for your friendly letter of Jan. 8. Particular circumstances have forced me to protract awhile my departure from office, which however will take place in the course of the year. Continue therefore if you please the general address of your letters to ‘the Secretary of state &c’ as recommended. Be assured that I shall carry into retirement and retain the most affectionate...