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  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Humphreys, David
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Humphreys, David" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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Your favor of Nov. 29. 1788. came to hand the last month. How it happened that mine of Aug. 1787. was fourteen months on it’s way is inconceivable. I do not recollect by what conveyance I sent it. I had concluded however either that it had miscarried or that you had become indolent as most of our countrymen are in matters of correspondence. The change in this country, since you left it, is...
I inclose you a letter from Gatteaux observing that there will be an anachronism, if, in making a medal to commemorate the victory of Saratoga, he puts on General Gates the insignia of the Cincinnati which did not exist at that date. I wrote him in answer that I thought so too: but that you had the direction of that business, that you were now in London, that I would write to you and probably...
Your letter on the subject of the medals came duly to hand, but the workman has not applied to me since as I expected, and, if I ever had his address, I have mislaid it, so that I cannot send to him. However I am not afraid that any thing is going wrong, as I had desired him to leave the part in question for the last. I inclose you two letters which have lately come to hand for you. Our town...
I have been honoured with your letter in which you mention to me your intention of returning to America in the April packet. It is with sincere concern that I meet this event, as it deprives me not only of your aid in the office in which we have been joined, but also of your society which has been to me a source of the most real satisfaction. I think myself bound to return you my thanks for...
I wrote you on the 7th. of May, being immediately on my return from England; and have lately received your favor of June 5. and thank you for the intelligence it contains. Every circumstance we hear induces us to beleive that it is the want of will, rather than of ability, to furnish contributions which keeps the public treasury so poor. The Algerines will probably do us the favour to produce...
A letter which I wrote you by express to bring you on here will have informed you of the circumstances which have occasioned me to sail from hence. A tissu of unfortunate events has deprived me of the pleasure of your company. We have waited till this moment in expectation of your joining us, but the return of the express now informs us you had left New-haven and therefore we sail in the...
My stay in London having been considerably longer than I had expected, I did not arrive in this place till the last day of April. I found here your kind letter of the 4th. of that month acknoleging much more than they deserved, my little attentions to you. Their only merit was their being faithful testimonies of a sincere regard for you. The obligations have in fact been on my side, and I...
I remember when you left us, it was with a promise to supply all the defects of correspondence in our friends, of which we complained, and which you had felt in common with us. Yet I have received but one letter from you which was dated June 5. 1786. and I answered it Aug. 14. 1786. Dropping that however and beginning a new account, I will observe to you that wonderful improvements are making...
I find on my arrival here that there is no vessel going for France from any Eastern port. There is a new brig of Mr. Tracy’s which sails for London in about ten days; but besides the objection to the place of her destination, another arises to that crowd of passengers to which we should be exposed in merchant ships without corresponding accomodations. I here learn that the French packet sails...
I mentioned in my letter to you that there was one circumstance which might induce me to take my passage from hence in a ship of Mr. Tracy’s. This was the obtaining a tolerable probability of being set ashore on the coast of France. Since my return from Portsmouth (which was the night before last) I have seen Mr. Tracy, and I think the probability of being landed at Brest, tho’ his ship goes...