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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Doctr. Franklin and sends him some newspapers received from America, which when he shall have perused he will beg the favor of him to send to Mr. Adams. RC ( PPAP ); addressed: “A Monsr. Monsr. Franklin Ministre plenip. des etats unis d’Amerique à Passy.” Not recorded in SJL . The papers sent have not been identified.
I have received your favor of Oct. 8. but the volume of the transactions mentioned to come with it, did not; but I have received one from Mr. Hopkinson. You also mention the diplomas it covered for other persons, and some order of the society relative to myself, which I suppose were omitted by accident and will come by some other conveiance. So far as relates to myself, whatever the order...
A Vessel sailing from Havre to Philadelphia furnishes the Mr. Fitzhughs with a passage to that place. To them therefore I confide a number of letters and packets which I have received for you from sundry quarters and which, I doubt not, they will deliver safe. Among these is one from Mr. Du Plessis. On receipt of your letter, in answer to the one I had written you on the subject of his...
I received your favor of March 20. and much satisfaction from it. I had been alarmed with the general cry that our commerce was in distress, and feared it might be for want of markets. But the high price of commodities shews that markets are not wanting. Is it not yet possible however that these high prices may proceed from the smallness of the quantity made, and that from the want of...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Mr. Adams and Doctr. Franklin and sends them his notes on the treaty with Prussia. He prays Mr. Adams, when he shall have perused them to send them to Dr. Franklin and proposes to meet them on the subject at Passy on Thursday at 12. o’clock. He sends the Prussian propositions, Mr. Adams’s and Dr. Franklin’s notes, and the former project and observations which...
I had the honour of writing to you on the 5th. of Oct. and since that have received yours of the 1st. of the same month. We were highly pleased here with the health you enjoyed on your voiage, and with the reception you met with at home. This was no more than I expected. Had I had a vote for the Presidentship, however, I doubt whether I should not have witheld it from you that you might have...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Library of Congress I arrived at this place a few days ago expecting to have proceeded to Europe in the vessel which carries Count Rochambaud & the Chevalr. de Chastellux; but it sails before I can be ready. I shall follow however in a very few days, & may possibly be with you as soon as this. Conscious that I can add no good to the commission,...
I arrived at this place a few days ago expecting to have proceeded to Europe in the vessel which carries Count Rochambaud and the Chevalr. de Chastellux; but it sails before I can be ready. I shall follow however in a very few days, and may possibly be with you as soon as this. Conscious that I can add no good to the commission, it shall be my endeavor to do it no injury. I understand that I...
Mr̃ Jefferson’s compliments to M r. Adams & D r. Franklin, and incloses to them the letter to the D. of Dorset on the separate articles. he also sends one on the general subject & in the general form as had been agreed when they parted last: but thinking that it might be better, by reciting what had been done with mr̃ Hartley to keep the ground we have gained, and not to admit that we...
Supposing that Congress would communicate to you directly the powers committed to yourself, Mr. Adams and myself, I have delayed from day to day the honour of writing to you, in hopes that every day would open to me a certainty of the time and place at which I might sail. A French packet will leave N. York early in the next month. By her I mean to take my passage, and may therefore expect in...
I heard with much pleasure yesterday of your safe arrival at Rouen, and that you had not been much fatigued with the journey. This gives me hopes that you will find less difficulty in the rest of the voiage. On my parting with you at Passy I went to the Duke of Dorset’s. He was not at home. I asked an hour the next day and waited on him. He promised to write the necessary letters to England to...
This will be handed you by Doctor Gibbons a young gentleman, who after studying physic and taking his degrees at Edinburgh has passed some time here. He has desired the honor of being known to you, and I find a pleasure in being the instrument of making him so. It is a tax to which your celebrity submits you. Every man of the present age will wish to have the honor of having known, and been...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Mr. Adams and Dr. Franklin, and incloses to them the letter to the D. of Dorset on the separate articles. He also sends one on the general subject and in the general form as had been agreed when they parted last: but thinking that it might be better, by reciting what had been done with Mr. Hartley to keep the ground we have gained, and not to admit that we...
AL : American Philosophical Society This note has probably far more importance than appears on the surface, because the likelihood is that Jefferson enclosed with it his draft of the Declaration of Independence. The evolution of that document has undergone repeated and microscopic analysis. A number of minor questions remain unanswered, but the general outline is clear. On June 7 the issue of...
The inclosed paper has been read and with some small alterations approved of by the committee. Will Doctr. Franklyn be so good as to peruse it and suggest such alterations as his more enlarged view of the subject will dictate? The paper having been returned to me to change a particular sentiment or two, I propose laying it again before the committee tomorrow morning, if Doctr. Franklyn can...
ALS : Library of Congress; AL (draft): Monroe Memorial Foundation The bearer hereof Colo James Monroe who served some time as an officer in the American army and as such distinguished himself in the affair of Princetown as well as on other occasions, having resumed his studies, comes to Europe to complete them. Being a citizen of this state, of abilities, merit & fortune, and my particular...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Supposing that Congress would communicate to you directly the powers committed to yourself, mr. Adams & myself, I have delayed from day to day the honour of writing to you, in hopes that every day would open to me a certainty of the time & place at which I might sail: a French packet will leave N. York early in the next month. By her I mean to take my...
The bearer hereof Colo. James Monroe who served some time as an officer in the American army and as such distinguished himself in the affair of Princetown as well as on other occasions, having resumed his studies, comes to Europe to complete them. Being a citizen of this state, of abilities, merit and fortune, and my particular friend, I take the liberty of making him known to you, that should...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Dr. Franklin. He was formerly well acquainted with Mr. Beaumarchais’ demand against the state of Virginia of which Mr. Chevallié’s makes a part. But many circumstances have escaped his memory, and he is quite unacquainted with the footing on which it stands at present. Mr. Short, who for two years past has been a member of the Council of Virginia, has arrived at...
The bearer hereof Mr. Thomas Shores is a native of Virginia, and having lately in conjunction with some others established a partnership for the purpose of carrying on a trade to Europe, he comes to France on behalf of his house to establish a proper mercantile correspondence. I am less acquainted with him than his partners whom I know to be able, punctual, and of great genius for trade; and...
Encroachments being made on the Eastern Limits of the United States by Settlers under the British Government, pretending that it is the Western, and not the Eastern River of the Bay of Passamaquoddy, which was designated by the Name of St. Croix in the Treaty of Peace with that Nation, I have to beg the Favor of you to communicate any Facts which your Memory or Papers may enable you to...
Knowing little of Mr. Chevallié’s claim as detached from that of Monsr. de Beaumarchais, and supposing it must stand on the same bottom being originally a part of it, I shall give you what information I can on the general subject. The contract for the supplies was made by Mr. de Francy, agent for Beaumarchais, with Mr. Henry then governor of Virginia. He received in paiment as much tobacco as...
AL : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Library of Congress The bearer hereof Mr. Thomas Shores is a native of Virginia and having lately, in conjunction with some others established a partnership for the purpose of carrying on a trade to Europe, he comes to France on behalf of his house to establish a proper mercantile correspondence. I am less acquainted with him than his partners...