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Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President of the US. and will have the honor of waiting on him to dinner on Thursday next NHi ; NNGL .
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the Vice-president of the U. S. and has the honor to inclose him the copy of a letter from the President, just now received. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have now the honour to inclose you a Report on the petition of John Mangnall, and of expressing to you the sentiments of perfect esteem & respect with which I am Sir— / Your most obedient / & most humble sert DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
I have the honor to inclose you a letter from one of our captive citizens of Algiers, if I may judge from the superscription and from the letters from the same quarter which I have received myself. as these relate to a matter before your house, and contain some information we have not before had, I take the liberty of inclosing you copies of them. I have the honour to be with sentiments of the...
As I propose to write you on business by Mr Cairnes who will set out in a few days for London, the object of the present letter is only to inform you that the Count de Vergennes died yesterday morning & that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor: and further to beg the favor of you to forward the inclosed by the first vessel from London. I set out on my journey on Sunday the 18th....
As the information contained in the inclosed extracts from a letter of Mr. Short’s lately arrived, has some relation to a subject now before the Senate, I have thought it my duty to communicate them, and have the honor to be with sentiments of the most profound respect and attachment. / Sir / Your most obedient and / most humble Servant: DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Th. Jefferson presents his respects to Mr. Adams and incloses him a letter which came to his hands last night; on reading what is written within the cover, he concluded it to be a private letter, and without opening a single paper within it he folded it up & now has the honor to inclose it to Mr Adams, with the homage of his high consideration and respect. MHi : Adams Papers.
From a letter received from the President mr Lear is satisfied he cannot be here to-day and doubts even the possibility of his arrival tomorrow. of course our expedition of to-day would be certainly fruitless, and is therefore laid aside agreeably to a message I have received from Genl. Knox & the attorney Genl. Your’s affectionately & respectfully MHi : Adams Papers.
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President of the US. and will have the honor of waiting on him to dinner on Thursday next RC (Gary Hendershott, Little Rock, Arkansas, 1992); addressed: “The President of the US.” Not recorded in SJL .
One among our many follies Was calling in for Steaks at Dolly’s Whereby we’ve lost—& feel like Sinners That we have miss’d much better dinners Nor do we think that us ‘tis hard on Most humbly thus to beg your pardon And promise that another time We’ll give our reason not our rhime So we’ve agreed—our Nem: Con: vote is That we thus early jointly give you notice For as our rule is to be clever...
Having, according to a resolution of the House of Representatives of February 23. 1791. given in to that House a Report on the privileges and restrictions on the commerce of the United States in foreign Countries, I think it my duty to lay a Copy of it before the Senate, and have the honor of being with the most perfect respect / Sir / Your Most Obedient / and Most humble Servt. DNA : RG...
I have the honour to inclose you a Postscript to the Report on Measures, Weights & coins now before your house. this has been rendered necessary by a small arithmatical error detailed in the estimate of the cubic foot proposed in that report. the head of Superficial measures is also therein somewhat more developed. Nothing is known, since the last session of Congress of any further proceedings...
The inclosed information relative to ransom & peace with the Algerines, being newly come to hand, I take the liberty of communicating it to you, & through you to the Senate. it concurs in some facts and opinions with what we had before learnt. thro other channels, and differs in some others, so as, on the whole, to leave us still in considerable uncertainty as to interesting points. I have the...
The bearer hereof Colo. James Monroe who served some time as an officer in the American army and as such distinguished himself in the affair of Princetown as well as on other occasions, having resumed his studies, comes to Europe to complete them. Being a citizen of this state, of abilities, merit and fortune, and my particular friend, I take the liberty of making him known to you, that should...
This will be handed you by young Monsieur de Tronchin son to a gentleman of that name here who is minister for the republic of Geneva, resident at this court. the son is now in England as a traveller. he is personally unknown to me; but what I hear of him from others, together with my acquaintance with, & respect for, his father, induces me to recommend him to your notice. I do this the rather...
It is very long, my dear friend, since I have written to you. the fact is that I have was scarcely at home at all from May to September, and from that time I have been severely indisposed and not yet recovered so far as to sit up to write, but in pain. having been subject to troublesome attacks of rheumatism for some winters past, and being called by other business into the neighborhood of our...
I am to thank you, my dear Sir, for forwarding M. D’Ivernois’ book on the French revolution. I receive every thing with respect which comes from him, but it is on politics, a subject I never loved, & now hate. I will not promise therefore to read it thoroughly. I fear the oligarchical executive of the French will not do. we have always seen a small council get into cabals & quarrels, the more...
I am now to acknoledge the receipt of your favor of Jan. 25. Colo. Franks sailed in the packet of this month from Havre for New York. This arrangement of the packets opens a direct communication between Paris and America, and if we succeed as I expect we shall in getting Honfleur made a freeport, I hope to see that place become the deposit for our Whale oil, rice, tobacco and furs, and that...
I had just closed the preceding letter when M. de Blumendorf the Imperial Secretary of legation called on me with the answer to Doctr. Franklin. It was that of Sep. 28. 1784 which you remember as well as myself, wherein Count Merci informed us the Emperor was disposed to enter into commercial arrangements with us and that he would give orders to the Government of the Austrian Netherlands to...
The public papers, my dear friend, announce the fatal event of which your letter of Oct. 20. had given me ominous foreboding. tried myself, in the school of affliction, by the loss of every form of connection which can rive the human heart, I know well, and feel what you have lost, what you have suffered, are suffering, and have yet to endure. the same trials have taught me that, for ills so...
I inclose you a letter from our friend D’Ivernois according to his request expressed in it. our geographical distance is insensible still to foreigners as they consider America of the size of a garden of which Massachusetts is one square & Virginia another. I know not what may have been your sentiments or measures respecting the transplantation of the science of Geneva to this country. if not...
The public papers, my dear friend, announce the fatal event of which your letter of Oct. 20. had given me ominous foreboding. tried myself, in the school of affliction, by the loss of every form of connection which can rive the human heart, I know well, and feel what you have lost, what you have suffered, are suffering, and have yet to endure. the same trials have taught me that, for ills so...
In consequence of the information I received from you on the first Wednesday in January that the list of votes for President and Vice President were received at the seat of government from all the states except that of Kentuckey, I sent a special messenger to the District judge of Kentuckey for the list of the votes of that state lodged in his custody, and by the return of the messenger...
Frouillé, the bookseller here who is engaged in having your book translated and printed, understanding that you were about publishing a sequel to it, has engaged me to be the channel of his prayers to you to favor his operation by transmitting hither the sheets of the sequel as they shall be printed; and he will have them translated by the same hand, which is a good one. It is necessary for me...
Baron Polnitz not going off till today enables me to add some information which I receive from Mr. Barclay this morning. You know the immense amount of Beaumarchais’ accounts with the U.S. and that Mr. Barclay was authorized to settle them. Beaumarchais had pertinaciously insisted on settling them with Congress. Probably he received from them a denial: for just as Mr. Barclay was about to set...
The messenger who carried my letter of yesterday to the Post-office brought me thence, on his return, the two pieces of homespun which had been separated by the way from your letter of Jan. 1. a little more sagacity of conjecture in me, as to their appellation, would have saved you the trouble of reading a long dissertation on the state of real homespun in our quarter. the fact stated however...
your letter of Apr. 2. was recieved in due time, and I have used the permission it gave me of sending a copy of that of Mar. 2. to the editor of Tracy’s Political economy. Mr. S. A. Wells of Boston, grandson of our old friend Saml. Adams, and who proposes to write the life of his grandfather, has made some enquiries of me relative to revolutionary antiquities which are within your knolege as...
In my letter of the 11 th. instant I had the honour of inclosing you copies of letters relative to the Barbary affairs. others came to hand three days ago, of some of which I now send you copies, & of the others the originals. by these you will perceive that mr̃ Randall and mr̃ Lamb were at Madrid, that the latter means to return to Alicant & send on a courier to us. mr̃ Randall does not...
I formerly had the honour of mentioning to you the measures I had taken to have our commerce with this country put on a better footing; and you know the circumstances which had occasioned the articles of whale oil and tobacco to be first brought forward. Latterly we got the committee, which had been established for this purpose, to take up the other articles, and on their report the King and...
My grandson Th: Jefferson Randolph, being on a visit to Boston, would think he had seen nothing were he to leave it without having seen you. altho’ I truly sympathise with you in the trouble these interruptions give, yet I must ask for him permission to pay to you his personal respects. like other young people, he wishes to be able, in the winter nights of old age, to recount to those around...
Doctr. Franklin sets out this morning for Havre from whence he is to cross over to Cowes there to be taken on board Capt. Truxen’s ship bound from London to Philadelphia. The Doctor’s baggage will be contained in 150. or 200 boxes &c. We doubt that the laws of England will not permit these things to be removed from one vessel into another; and it must be attended with great difficulty, delay...
I received this day a letter from mrs Adams of the 26th. ult. informing me you would set out on the 29th. for the Hague. our affairs at Amsterdam press on my mind like a mountain. I have no information to go on but that of the Willincks & Van Staphorsts, & according to that something seems necessary to be done. I am so anxious to confer with you on this, & to see you & them together, & get...
My last letter to you was dated the 27 th. of August, since which I have recieved yours of Sep. 11 th. — The letter to m r. Lamb therein inclosed I immediately signed & forwarded. In mine wherein I had the honor of proposing to you the mission of m r. Barclay to Algiers, I mentioned that my expectations from it were of a subordinate nature only. I very readily therefore recede from it in...
In my letter of the 11th. instant I had the honour of inclosing you copies of letters relative to the Barbary affairs. Others came to hand three days ago, of some of which I now send you copies, and of the others the originals. By these you will perceive that Mr. Randall and Mr. Lamb were at Madrid, that the latter means to return to Alicant and send on a courier to us. Mr. Randall does not...
Three long and dangerous illnesses within the last 12. months must apologise for my long silence towards you. The paper bubble is then burst. this is what you & I, and every reasoning man, seduced by no obliquity of mind, or interest, have long foreseen. yet it’s disastrous effects are not the less for having been foreseen. we were laboring under a dropsical fulness of circulating medium....
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks and Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
The time which has intervened between the receipt of your favor, covering D’Ivernois’ letter, and this answer, needs apology, but this will be found in the state of the case. I had received from him a letter similar to that you inclosed. as the adoption of his plan depended on our legislature, and it was then in session, I immediately inclosed it to a member with a request that he would sound...
I had just closed the preceding letter when M. de Blumendorf the Imperial Secretary of legation called on me with the answer to Doct r. Franklin. it was that of Sep. 28. 1784 which you remember as well as myself, wherein Count Merci informed us the Emperor was disposed to enter into commercial arrangements with us & that he would give orders to the Government of the Austrian Netherlands to...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Mr. Adams and Doctr. Franklin and sends them his notes on the treaty with Prussia. He prays Mr. Adams, when he shall have perused them to send them to Dr. Franklin and proposes to meet them on the subject at Passy on Thursday at 12. o’clock. He sends the Prussian propositions, Mr. Adams’s and Dr. Franklin’s notes, and the former project and observations which...
Your letter of the 10th. came safely to hand and I delivered the one therein inclosed to Mr. Grand. It was a duplicate of one he had before received. You will have heard of the safe arrival of Doctr. Franklin in America. Strange we do not hear of that of Otto and Doradour. If you know of the safe arrival of the packet in which they went, pray communicate it to me, as Madame de Doradour, who is...
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks & Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
I inclose you the copy of a letter received from mr[expansion sign] Barclay dated Cadiz May 23. by which you will perceive he was still on this side the Mediterranean. has mr[expansion sign] Lamb written to you? I hear nothing from him nor of him, since mr[expansion sign] Carmichael’s information of his arrival in Spain. mr[expansion sign] Randall gave reason to expect that himself would come...
Since mine of Jan. 14. yours of Jan. 2. and Mar. 1. have been handed to me; the former by Mr. Jones, whom I am glad to know on your recommendation and to make him the channel of evidencing to you how much I esteem whatever comes from you.—The internal agitations of this country and the inactivity to which England is reduced by the state of imbecillity in which the madness of the king has...
From a letter received from the President Mr. Lear is satisfied he cannot be here to-day and doubts even the possibility of his arrival tomorrow. Of course our expedition of to-day would be certainly fruitless, and is therefore laid aside agreeably to a message I have received from Genl. Knox and the attorney General. Your’s affectionately & respectfully, RC ( MHi : AM ); addressed: “The...
Your kind letter of the 11th. has given me great satisfaction for altho’ I could not doubt but that the hand of age was pressing heavily on you, as on myself, yet we like to know the particulars and the degree of that pressure. much reflection too has been produced by your suggestion of lending my letter of the 1st. to a printer. I have generally great aversion to the insertion of my letters...
I am to thank you for the book you were so good as to transmit me, as well as the letter covering it, and your felicitations on my present quiet. the difference of my present & past situation is such as to leave me nothing to regret but that my retirement has been postponed four years too long. The principles on which I calculate the value of life are entirely in favor of my present course. I...
I do myself the honor to enclose to you a Resolution of the Senate of this day. I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient and very humble servant RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); at foot of text: “The President of the United States”; in hand of Samuel A. Otis, signed by TJ. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Senate resolution of 18 Feb. (same, in Otis’s hand; see below). The Senate on 18 Feb.,...
Supposing that you would receive from Congress a direct communication of the powers given to yourself, Doct r. Franklin & myself, I have deferred from day to day writing to you, in hopes that every day would open to me a certainty of the time & place of my departure for the other side of the Atlantic. Paris being my destination I have thought it best to enquire for a passage to France...
The inclosed letter is come to hand since I had the honour of addressing you last. Will you be so good as to forward a copy to Mr. Jay? The assembly of Notables is held to secrecy, so that little transpires and this floats among so much incertain matter that we know not what can be depended on. 80. millions more of annual revenue and provincial assemblies are the certain objects. The giving to...
Your favour of July 16. came duly to hand by mr[expansion sign] Trumbul. with respect to the whale oil, tho’ this country has shewn a desire to draw it hither, & for that purpose have reduced the duties to about four guineas on the English ton, yet I do not see a probability of a further reduction at this moment. it has been much pressed, & I expect every day to receive a final determination....