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A continuation of poor health makes me an irregular correspondent. I am therefore your debtor for the two letters of Jan. 20. & Feb. 21. it was after you left Europe that Dugald Stuart, concerning whom you enquire, and Ld. Dare, second son of the Marquis of Lansdowne came to Paris. they brought me a letter from Ld. Wycombe whom you knew. I became immediately intimate with Stuart, calling...
Absences and avocations have had prevented my acknoleging your favor of Feb. 2. when that of Apr. 19. arrived. I had not the pleasure of recieving the former by the hands of mr Lyman . his business probably carried him in another direction; for I am far inland, & distant from the great line of communication between the trading cities.    your recommendations are always welcome, for indeed the...
About a week before I recieved your favor of Dec. 30. the 22d. No. of the North American review had come to hand, without my knowing from what quarter. the letter of mr Channing to mr Shaw, which you have been so good as to inclose, founds a presumption that it was from mr Channing, and that he is the editor. I had never before seen the work; but have read this No. with attention and great...
I was so unfortunate as not to recieve from mr Holly’s own hand your favor of Jan. 28. being then at my other home. he dined only with my family, & left them with an impression which has filled me with regret that I did not partake of the pleasure his visit gave them. I am glad he is gone to Kentucky. rational Christianity will thrive more rapidly there than here. they are freer from...
I have duly recieved the favor of your invitation of the 12 th inst. to join you on the interesting occasion of the reception of Maj r Gen l La Fayette. in testifying the veneration of the citizens of Richm d for his character, their sense of his services, and their affection for his person. no one would harmonise in all these sentiments more cordially than myself, no one perhaps having had so...
My friend and correspondent of Richmond, Col o Bernard Peyton will have the honor of delivering you this letter. he was a worthy officer of the late war, and now an equally worthy member of the mercantile body. proposing to visit Boston, he has the natural ambition of being presented to the first of the revolutionary characters now living. I ask, of your friendship to give him a few moments of...
Your letter of Aug. 15. was recieved in due time, and with the welcome of every thing which comes from you. with it’s opinions on the difficulties of revolutions, from despotism to freedom, I very much concur. the generation which commences a revolution can rarely compleat it. habituated from their infancy to passive submission of body and mind to their kings and priests, they are not...
Absences and avocations had prevented my acknoleging your favor of Feb. 2. when that of Apr. 19. arrived. I had not the pleasure of recieving the former by the hands of mr Lyman. his business probably carried him in another direction; for I am far inland, & distant from the great line of communication between the trading cities. your recommendations are always welcome, for indeed the subjects...
I am in debt to you for your letters of May 21. 27. & June 22. the first delivered me by mr Greenwood gave me the gratification of his acquaintance; and a gratification it always is to be made acquainted with gentlemen of candor, worth and information, as I found mr Greenwood to be. that on the subject of mr Samuel Adams Wells shall not be forgotten in time and place, when it can be used to...
I know nothing of the facts in this petition, nor of the person on whose behalf they are stated, but I know most of those who subscribe it, and can certify that they are persons of the first degree of respectability in the county in which I reside and of unquestionable credit as to any thing which they affirm. Given under my hand this 8 th of February 1826. To the President of the United...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to mr Adams for the copy he has been so kind as to send him of his very able and profound Report on Weights and measures. from the general view, the only one he has yet had time to take of it, it seems really to present every thing which is useful on the subject. he shall read it seriously, with the interest he takes in the subject and with an earnest desire to...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to mr Adams for the copy of the Ghent Documents which he has been so kind as to send him. so far as concerns mr Adams personally, the respect and esteem of the public for him was too firmly and justly fixed, to need this appeal to them. but the volume is a valuable gift to his fellow citizens generally, and especially to the future historian whom it will enable...
Yours of the 4 th of Oct. was not recieved here until the 20 th having been 16. days on it’s passage, since which unavoidable avocations have made this the first moment it has been in my power to acknolege it’s reciept. of the character of M. de Pradt his political writings furnish a tolerable estimate, but not so full as you have favored me with. he is eloquent, and his pamphlet on colonies...
I am thankful for the very interesting message and documents of which you have been so kind as to send me a copy, and will state my recollections as to the particular passage of the message to which you ask my attention. on the conclusion of peace, Congress, sensible of their right to assume independance, would not condescend to ask it’s acknolegement from other nations, yet were willing, by...
On my return to this place after an absence of 6 weeks I find here your favor of Nov. 29 . when I proposed to the President the appointment of mr Sasserno to be Consul at Nice , I was not possessed of his Christian name. I therefore took measures immediately to obtain it, and found also, on my return here, the answers to my enquiries. his name is Victor Adolphus Sasserno . I was intimately...
A mr Runnels of S t Bartholemew’s, having a son George Runnels now in N. York, has requested me to be the channel of communicating to the government his wish that his son might be appointed Agent of the US. at Trinidad, S t Vincent’s, S t Lucia or S t Kitts. being a stranger to me he referred me to the Baron de Stackleberg for his character, who answers me in these words. ‘ j’ai l’avantage de...
I have safely recieved the two copies of the facsimile of the Decln of Indepdce which you have been so kind as to send me under a resoln of Congress. with a due sense of respect for this mark of attention to myself I contemplate with pleasure the evidence afforded of reverence for that instrument, and view in it a pledge of adhesion to it’s principles, and of a sacred determination to maintain...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful salutation to mr Adams, and his thanks for the copy of the journals of the convention which he has been so kind as to send him. but also presented to the University of Virginia, has been properly addressed to Th:J. as Rector of that institution and shall be carefully preserved until the proper depository shall be provided. he prays mr Adams to be assured...
My grandson, Th: Jefferson Randolph, bearer of this letter being on a journey to the North, I could not permit him to pass thro’ Washington, without enjoining on him the duty of paying his respects to you. I presume he will find you approaching the close of your winter’s campaign, a term as welcome to the civil as military officer. I am glad to avail myself at the same time of the occasion of...
An absence from home of some length has occasioned your letter of Apr. 24. to remain here unanswered until my return. the operation of sitting for portraits and busts, especially after it has been so often done, and probably as well as it will be done again, and that too before the havoc of age had left nothing but an. anatomy to copy, needed the strong motive of my desire to meet any wish...
As Rector of the University of Virginia, I have recieved at several times the underwritten volumes of which I make this acknolegement as a proper voucher for your office, and pray you to be assured of my constant sentiments of respect and esteem. State papers of 1818. 8. vols 8 vo Secret journals of Congress. 4. v. 8 vo Journals of the Federal Convention 1. v. 8 vo Census for 1820. 1. v....
Your favor of the 5 th has been duly recived, covering my two letters to you of Oct. 7. 1809. and Apr. 20. 1810. which I now return of these be pleased to make whatever use you think proper. but I should think the the first half of the last letter had better be omitted, as it would encumber mr Skinner’s columns with matter entirely useless & uninteresting to his readers. I am very glad to...
I recieved successively the two bottles of wine you were so kind as to send me. the first, called Tokay, is truly a fine wine, of high flavor, and, as you assure me there was not a drop of brandy or other spirit in it, I may say it is a wine of a good body of it’s own. the 2 d bottle, a red wine, I tried when I had good judges at the table. we agreed it was a wine one might always drink with...
Present roads Proposed roads from the Mainstreet of Charlottesville Miles po   miles to  Moore’s creek   0.98     to  Secretary’s ford 614. = 1.92. by Smith the Thoro’fare 1.25
I am very sensible of the kind attention of the trustees of Allegany college, in sending me a copy of the catalogue of their library, and congratulate them on the good fortune of having become the objects of donations so liberal. that of D r Bentley is truly valuable for it’s classical riches, but mr Winthrop’s is inappreciable for the variety of the branches of science to which it extends,...
Th: J. returns thanks to mr Allen for the copy with which he has been favored of his address to the Berkshire associan, expresses his great pleasure on it’s successful progress, and with his best wishes for it’s continued improvem t salutes mr Allen with esteem & respect MHi .
I thank you, Sir , for the pamphlet you have been so kind as to send me on Naval architecture. retired from the business of the world, enfeebled in body by age & relaxed in mind I cease to interest pay attention wherever I can be excused from it. the improvement appears probable and beautiful, and I wish well to every thing which may better the condition of man, and to nothing more than what...
White Hermitage wine costs about 4. or 4 ½ francs the bottle. the best crop is that of M. Jourdans , who has always furnished me. it is a little silky . but he furnishes Maj r Butler with that which is quite dry , which is preferred by some, according to taste, and is a superlatively fine wine. The best claret (except the 4. crops
While I had the pleasure of being with you at the Warm springs , I took the liberty of recommending to you some wines of France & Italy , with a note of their prices & of the channels thro’ which they may be got. but instead of calling for them on my recommendation only, I have thought it better that you should have samples to direct your choice. for in nothing have the habits of the palate...
I am very sensible of the testimony of respect rendered me by the Calliopean society, in naming me an honorary member of their institution. if distance has rendered my personal action with them impossible, I am endeavoring nevertheless to merit the association with which they have honored me, by employing the slender faculties which time and nature have spared me in fostering an institution...
In your favor of Sep. 27 you were so obliging as to inform me that on communicating to you the port at which the Professors engaged in England for the Univ ty of Virga would arrive, you would give instrns immediately to the Collector to consider the books of the Professors as embraced by the exemption from duty of the act of April 1816. I learnt yesterday for the first time that they would...
I learnt yesterday, by a letter from mr Gilmer at New York that Doctor Blaetterman one of our Professors had arrived there and informed him that the other four Professors had sailed in the Competitor from London direct for James river where they might be hourly expected. I must therefore trouble you a second time with a request that instructions may be sent to the Collectors of that river to...
Having sollicited mr James Barber to expedite as much as he could the reciept of the 50. M .D. of the claim of Virginia on the Gen l government, which was given to the University of Virginia, he informs me by a letter of the 19 th that the President of the US; without waiting for actual settlement, has sanctioned the payment, on account, of the sum given to the University, and that it is...
Your letter of May 22. has been duly recieved. mine to miss Mary Stith has informed you of her title to an undivided sixth of 400. a s of land in this county thro’ which the vein of limestone passes which traverses this state parallel with it’s first ridge of mountains, and which constitutes what value it has, the land being worthless and about a third or half of it claimed by two adjoining...
A long absence from home has been the principal cause of my delay in answering your letter. I now inclose your prospectus with my name to it and 3. dollars, the price of the copy subscribed for; and with my wishes for the success of your work I tender you the assurance of my respect. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Your favor of June 23. has been duly recieved, and I am sorry it is not in my power to say a word on the appointment of Professors to our University. I explained in my letter to D r Fernandes the circumstances on which the opening of the institute would depend. these make it uncertain whether it may be soon or many years hence. during this uncertainty the Visitors form no decisions as to...
I duly rec d the copy of your late pamphlet on shipbuilding, and your favor of the 11 th is now at hand requesting ‘my jdmt on it as a means of bringing it into early & gen l practice in the US.’ born & bred among the mountains, and scarcely knowing the head from the stern of a ship it would be great presumption in me to offer to my f.c. a jdmt on a subject on which they know that I must be so...
I am making a change in my central room here which will require the plaistering of the ceiling to be done anew entire ly say about 30. or 40. square yards. it is extremely desirable to have this done immediately on our closing the roof, which will be about the latter end of this present week. can you do me the favor so to arrange your business as to come & do it immediately on notice? when...
The bearer hereof, Joseph Antrim has been employed, as plaisterer, to do the whole plaistering of all the buildings of the University of Virginia, which he has executed with fidelity and a skill of the first order. he is moreover of perfectly correct habits and conduct, sober, industrious, faithful, and worthy of any degree of trust which may be reposed in him. Given under my hand this 25 th...
This is merely to convey to you a triplicate of Gwathmey’s bill on James Hogarty of Liverpool for 369 £ 10. s sterling, the 1 st & 2 d of which were sent to mr Williams, of which 444. D. are to be paid on my account to M. & M de Pini and 1200. D. to be credited by you to the University of Virginia for the purposes explained to you in my letter of Apr. 16. I salute you with affectionate...
I had been so long without hearing from you ( my last from you being dated Oct. 8. 24.) that I sat down to communicate my anxieties to you which I had accdly done in a long letter when the mail of that day brought me your’s of Apr. 13. and rendered mine of course useless. I learn with regret that you had suffered inconvenience from the want of remittances, your former letters had given me...
My letters to you, within the last 12. months have been of May 28. 19., with the annual remittance to M. & M e Pini, Sep. 3. informing you of a remittance thro’ mr Vaughan of 300. D. for the wives of the two Raggis, and Feb: 15. 20. announcing a remittance of 400. D. for the same persons to pay their passage and expences to the US. since the last of these your two of Jan. 15. & 21. have been...
My last to you was of Apr. 4. which went by duplicates. since that I have recieved yours of Apr. 29. Aug. 26. and Nov 10. the accident which delayed the reciept of the bill of exchange for M. and M e Pini has been the subject of infinite regret and mortification to me; there being nothing on which my attention is more religiously fixed than on the punctual remittance of the annual interest due...
Your favor of Oct. 10 did not come to hand until Mar. 6. I communicated to the Visitors of the University your statement of the prices at which you could have our Ionic and Corinthian capitels of Marble of Carrara delivered at Leghorn, and they determined on the expediency of getting them from you. I am now therefore to request you to furnish us with 10. Ionic capitels, 6. Corinthian d o and...
Your’s of Dec. 20. was recieved on the 13 th Ult. & covered the acceptable letter of Madame Pini , which gave me infinit e satisfaction, as it rendered legitimate a delay which is of much con v enience to me, and shall not injure her. be so good as to present to her & to M. Pini my acknolegements for this indulgence, & the assurance that their trust shall not be abused, that the interest shall...
I write to you from an occasional, but very distant residence from Monticello, which place I left the 13 th of July. the two Raggis had arrived at the University about a week before that, which time I employed in getting them placed comfortably, and prepared to begin work. they have desired me to remit to you 300. D. to wit 150. each for his respective wife. I have accordingly directed the...
This will be handed you by mr William C. Preston , son of Gen l Francis Preston of this state, who in the course of his travels in Europe , may probably find occasion to call on you. he is not personally known to me, but I am assured of his worth by and distinguished talents by those who know him and command my entire confidence. his standing in this state is high, and I believe I render you...
My last to you was of July 18. 16. since which I have recieved yours of May 15. and 30. July 30. Sep. 27. & Oct. 20. of the same year, & Mar. 5. of the present, with the seed of the Lupinella. this came to hand too late to be sown this season, and is therefore reserved for the ensuing spring. mr Madison recieved what you sent him somewhat earlier, & sowed a little (not chusing to venture the...
Since mine of Sep. 3. I have recieved yours of Aug. 23. Sep. 4. & 10. the two Raggis are now at work with us. they could not in the beginning break themselves at once to the great differences of habits manners, living, & language here from those to which they had been habituated all their lives. they are now however much more contented, and I think they have made up their minds to continue a...
In my letter of July 10. I informed you that the Capitels you had forwarded were then on their way to Richmond. they came to hand here in August and are now put up. they are well approved on the whole, and particularly as to the quality of the marble. but I am instructed to mention some particulars not fully executed. 1. in the Corinthian capitels there is a want of the Cavetto and listel of...