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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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You must give me leave to return you the inclosed, as I have laid aside the distressing trade of receiving money for serving my friends. the pleasure of doing them an acceptable office is the richest reward which can be conferred on me, and I never think them ungenerous but when they decline giving me an opportunity of proving this. the late occasion too was peculiarly sacred. the packet to...
2Memorandum Books, 1775 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 2. Elias Wells v. Higgins 2. Cav. v. Thompkins v. C. Tompkins. See Apr. 18. 1774. Pl. supposes are patd. If so dismiss Cav. (Those v. B. & C. Tompkins are patd. See Feb. 7. 1774.) 26. Robert Biscoe (Cumberland). Send him an opinion on the case of John Muse’s children to whom he is father in law. John Woodson (Cumberld.). Credit him for ferriages 8/6. Feb. 14. Biscoe. Committed opn. to...
Your letter of Aug. 23. 1774 and Proposals for collecting and publishing the American state papers I have received. It is an undertaking of great utility to the continent in general, as it will not only contribute to the information of all those concerned in the administration of government, but will furnish to any historical genius which may happen to arise those materials which he would...
I had the pleasure by a gentleman who saw you at Birmingham to hear of your welfare. By Capt. Aselby of the True-patriot belonging to Messrs. Farrell & Jones of Bristol I send you three dozen bottles of Madeira, being the half of a present which I had laid by for you. The captain was afraid to take more on board lest it should draw upon him the officers of the customs. The remaining three...
Articles of confederation and perpetual Union proposed by the delegates of the several colonies of New Hampshire &c. in General Congress met at Philadelphia May. 10. 1775. The Art. I. name of this confederacy shall henceforth be ‘The united < colonies > states of North America.’ The Art. II. said united colonies hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other binding on...
souls dollars New Hampshire 100,000 82,713 2 Massachusets 350,000 289,496 Rhode island 58,000 47,973 Connecticut 200,000 165,426 New York 200,000 165,426 New Jersey 130,000
I am to acknoledge the receipt of your letter, and to scribble a line in answer, being just in the moment of setting out on my journey. The situation of your island is truly hard, and I should think deserves a relaxation of our terms if I may trust my first thoughts on the subject. I also think it probable it might be mutually beneficial to us. Should I continue of that opinion I will...
The large strides < advances > of late taken by the legislature of Great Britain towards establishing < in > over the colonies their absolute rule, and the hardiness of their present attempt to effect by force of arms what by law or right they could never effect render< s > it necessary for us also to change < shift > the ground of opposition and to close with their last appeal from reason to...
< We > A Declaration < of > by the representatives of the United colonies of America now sitting in General Congress, < to all nations send greeting > < of > setting forth the causes & necessity of their tak[ing up arms]. The large strides of late taken by the legislature of Great Britain towards establishing over these colonies their absolute rule, and the hardiness of the present attempt to...
You will before this have heard that the war is now heartily entered into, without a prospect of accomodation but thro’ the effectual interposition of arms. General Gage has received considerable reinforcements, tho’ not to the [wh]ole amount of what was expected. There has lately been an action at the outlet of the town of Boston. The particulars we have not yet been able to get with...