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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Wood, James
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Wood, James" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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A Doctr. John August Leonhard Kohly , chaplain to Brigadr. Specht’s regiment complains that a considerable sum of money is due to him from a German Doctor Smith who he says is a tavern keeper on the road to Richmond. As he cannot maintain an action for it I have recommended to him to call on Smith personally as the most likely way to sustain his right, and have referred him to you for leave....
This express brings some packets of letters for Generals Specht, Hamilton and Gall, which came by the Patsy, flag of truce, just arrived from New York with money and stores for the Convention Troops. You will please send on the Express to the first two named gentlemen. The flag is to go up the James River as far as she can. When her arrival there shall be notified to you, you will be pleased...
This express brings some packets of letters for Generals Specht, Hamilton and Gall, which came by the Patsy, flag of truce just arrived from New York with money and stores for the Convention troops. You will please to send on the express to the two first named gentlemen. The flag is to go as far up James river as she can. When her arrival there shall be notified to you, you will be pleased to...
I take up your letters of Apr. 12. and 23. to answer at this very late day, having never been able to get a council since the 7th. of April till four or five days ago, so that I was unable to give you an effective answer. The council think it better to leave to yourself altogether the enforcing the order you inclosed me and which I now return. They rather advise that it should not be printed,...
The progress of the enemy with a very considerable body of cavalry from South to North, tho’ not perfectly known, is yet reported here on such grounds as are thought sufficient to render it prudent to be on our guard. This has given occasion to the inclosed resolution of assembly for calling in all the absent officers and soldiers of the conventioners to the barracks, and the advice of council...
I have heard with real concern the sufferings of the guard and prisoners at your station, for want of provisions, and the more as it has been out of my power to afford relief. There is no exertion I would not put in practice, to help you. I am told the assembly are taking measures to enable us to carry on government: and I think that the late motions of the enemy begin already sensibly to...
The assembly (on your letter being laid before them) having taken off the restraint of their resolution leaves us free to follow our own judgment which coincides with yours as to the inexpediency of calling the officers to the barracks. This measure may therefore be dispensed with, and the rather as no intelligence gives reason to apprehend that the enemy have ventured to make them an object...
I inclose you a remission of the sentence against La Brune, also a letter to the Commissioners for carrying into execution the provision law in Albemarle directing them to send to the barracks their salt meats also. This with others to the six circumjacent counties of Amherst, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Louisa, Orange and Culpeper had been made out before the receipt of yours. The others are sent...
The multiplicity of business which happened to be on us when your express came has occasioned his being delayed‥‥ I enclose you letters to the commissioners of the circumjacent counties extending their powers to live cattle. It has been always necessary for the State and continent to lend interchangeably such articles as the one has and the other wants‥‥ You can readily conceive that in this...
I am satisfied that in the midst of a campaign and while N. York may perhaps be the object, Genl. Washington would not permit a convention officer to pass from his camp to N. York; nor can I suppose it proper such a one should see his camp as he might find means of communicating with the enemy: but in this you will do as you please. I see no objection to General Hamilton’s sending an express,...