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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Nelson, Thomas
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    • Revolutionary War
    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Nelson, Thomas" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Mr. Eppes, Doct. Griffin, Doct. Foushee, Mr. Hylton, Mr. Selden and others wish to serve in the Cavalry during the Invasion. We give orders to furnish them with such accoutrements as we have, and will be oblig[ed] to you to form them and others into a proper troop or troops, settling the commands as shall be most agreeable to themselves. I am With great respect, Sir, your most obed. Servt., FC...
An order and Account of which the inclosed is a Copy being presented to the Board and no advice thereof previously received from you they ask the favour of you to inform them of the particular Occasion which rendered the order necessary, and (as far as you are able) to what uses the Horses were applied. I am &c., FC ( Vi ). Enclosure not identified. No reference to an order or account...
I beg leave to trouble you with a Letter from Captn. Joel. As it is not consistent with the regulations of this State in the Money Department to pay expences in the lump without Account, and you best know what Time Captain Joel has spent in our Service, we ask the favor of you either to appoint some person to settle his Account and say what he should receive, or to report to us the Number of...
Information having been given the Board that sundry Horses of British property, having been left by the Enemy, were taken by our Militia or un-armed Citizens, and a question made whether they belong to the Commonwealth or the Captor, we are of opinion that they should be yeilded to the Captor. It is thought however where any possible doubt can arise who was the Captor, that the Horse should be...
I received your letter of the 18th. the night before last and deferred answering it till I could confer with Baron Steuben which I had an opportunity of doing yesterday evening. He shewed me a letter from Monsr. Tilly from which and the information of his aid who went down, we suppose the French squadron sailed on a cruise yesterday morning. They will however be within our call, and therefore...
I am very anxious to prepare for cooperating with our Allies, and for providing for their support. For the former purpose measures are taking as agreed on this moment in a conference with Baron Steuben. For the latter we suppose York town the most effectual to prepare as an Assylum for their Vessels. Colo. Senf comes down with instructions to point out what may be done there in a short time;...
We sent expresses on the 17th instant to call down a fourth part of the militia of the Counties of Loudon, Fauquier, Prince William and Fairfax (about 1090) with orders to march immediately to Wmsburg. Genl. Weedon followed these orders to hasten their execution. These Counties are indeed distant, but they had been some time held in readiness; so that I hope they will afford an early and very...
As I suppose by this time you may have more Men than Arms, and there are no more Arms fit for use remaining in the public Stock, œconomy will require that the surplus Militia be discharged. This measure is the more necessary, as the law for raising new levies remains unexecuted while the Militia are from their Counties. I shall therefore take the liberty of pointing out to you, as I have done...
Your suspension of Capt. Joel’s enterprise against the Enemy’s fleet seems to have been well grounded. It was become so universally known, as to leave little doubt of the Enemy’s being apprised of it and of course prepared against it. Capt. Maxwell had some time before informed me that the Dragon had been devoted to this purpose. He at the same time assured me he had found it impossible to...
The Bearer hereof Capt. Joel proposes to engage two others to undertake with himself an enterprize on the Enemy’s fleet wherever it shall be collected in Harbour. As he requires only an old Vessell of the most worthless kind, and proper preparations for her, I think the object will justify the risk. So many Orders and Measures may be necessary in the detail of executing this Business that I...
I will send to Mr. Brown the Commissary the Paragraph from your Letter relative to Provisions with orders for him to take measures for Relief. At the same time I wish the Principal expenditures could be in Indian meal that the Flour might be kept as much as possible for the Summer’s use. Majr. Hollier has no authority to make exchange [of] Prisoners with the enemy. The inclosed Proclamation...
The Enemy left a number of Horses at Westover which they had taken during their late incursion. Colo. Nicholas very properly ordered a party to take charge of them and bring them to the Quarter Master where they might be kept for the Owners to come and claim them; but I am well informed that in the [mean] time several Men of Capt. Hockaday’s Command of Charles City have plundered and carried...
I have never heard a tittle of the Enemy since your information that they were at Sandy Point the day after they left Westover; nor is any thing known at this place as to their subsequent Movements. As this want of intelligence might eventually be fatal, I have ordered an Express to be stationed at Bottom’s Bridge, another at New Kent Court House, a third at Bird’s tavern, a fourth at...
It happened unfortunately that from the Tenor of Mr. Wrays Lett[er] which gave us the first Intelligence of the Appearance of an Enemy we had reason to expect more precise Information within a few Hours. None such having come within fifty Hours, the first Intelligence had become totally disbelieved. At 10 o’Clock this morning I first received Confirmation of it. Orders go out by the members of...
I gave orders to Mr. Brown to send you a Sufficiency of Flour to fill up any Intervals which might happen between your Supplies of indian meal. We think the Stands of Arms you have directed to be purchased at Baltimore are a great Bargain if they be really good and will certainly find means of paying for them. The Corn at Cumberland was Continental Property having been delivered to Colo....
I arrived here last Tuesday after being detained hence six weeks longer than I intended by a malady of which Gilmer can inform you. I have nothing new to inform you of as the last post carried you an account of the naval engagement in Delaware. I inclose a vote of yesterday on the subject of government as the ensuing campaign is likely to require greater exertion than our unorganized powers...