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    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Huntington, Samuel
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Huntington, Samuel" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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The want of intelligence of the Southern movements of the enemy, and the anxieties we have felt on that account, cannot have been less experienced by Congress. Having just now received a state of things as they are at present in that quarter, from Governor Nash, and from Colo. Monroe (the gentleman whom in a former letter I had informed Congress I had sent to hang as near as he could about the...
By Mr. Foster Webb you will receive in part of the requisition of Congress of 1,953,200 Dollars, the following sums, to wit 650,000 Dollars in money, and bills for 780,239 8/9 Dollars, making in the whole 1,430,239 8/9 Dollars. There remains a deficiency of 522,960 1/9 dollars which I hope to be able to send on within four weeks from this time. I should have been very happy to have been...
I have received and shall duly comply with the recommendations of Congress for corresponding with their committee at Headquarters. It having been necessary to lay their and your requisitions before the General assembly, it has not been within my power to give any effectual answer till within these few days; and now only on the article of provisions. I beg leave to refer you to my letter to...
According to the desire of Congress expressed in their resolutions of the 17th Ult. I shall endeavor to inform them what has been done by this state in consequence of the several resolutions there referred to. 1779. Mar. 9. Recommendation to the states to compleat their respective quotas of 80 battalions. 1780. Feb. 9. United states to furnish their respective deficiencies of 35,211 men on or...
It is not in my power to add any circumstance of consequence to those communicated to you by Genl. Gates, and as I suppose to the delegates of N. Carolina by Gover. Nash a letter from whom accompanies this, and I take for granted communicates the later intelligence which he was so kind as to transmit me at the same time. A force is again collected of between four and five thousand men...
Since the dispatches forwarded three days ago I have received others from Genl. Gates which he was pleased to leave open for my perusal and desired they might then be sent on by the line of expresses. He has therein informed you of the articles he has called on us for, and it may be important that you should know as well what we cannot as what we can do. Of the tents desired we cannot procure...
On receipt of the resolutions of Congress of June 19, for procuring Horses to remount Whites and Washingtons cavalry we laid the same before the assembly and were authorized by them to engage the state for payment. We thereon sent out powers to the different counties to purchase 160 Horses which were properly described in addition to 83, the purchase of which we had before authorized. That...
According to Genl. Gates’s request I transmit to your Excellency the inclosed copy of a letter I received from him this morning. That the enemy should meditate taking possession of Portsmouth in the manner they give out does not seem probable, as Sr. Henry Clinton under the present appearances would scarcely consent to spare men from New York; and that they should think of taking possession of...
At the desire of Genl. Gates I transmit you the inclosed letters from Genl. Harrington and Colo. Marian and the deposition of a prisoner escaped from the enemy. A Gentleman will set out from this place within two days for Philadelphia to receive and bring our quota of the new money, which we hope will be in readiness for him. I have the honor to be with the greatest respect Your Excellency’s...
[Richmond, 27 Sep. 1780. JCC Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 , ed. W. C. Ford and others, Washington, 1904–1937 , xviii , 912 (9 Oct. 1780): “A letter, of 27 September, from Governor Jefferson was read, accompanied with copies of the acts of the Virginia assembly, from the beginning of the year, 1779.” Letter not located, but the Journals record two days later that, on a motion...