You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Madison Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 170 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Mrs. Randolph, Ellen & myself intended before this to have had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Madison and yourself at Montpelier as we mentioned to Mr. Coles; but three days ago Mrs. Randolph was taken with a fever, which has confined her to her bed ever since. it is so moderate that we are in the hourly hope of it’s leaving her and, after a little time to recruit her strength, of carrying our...
Letter not found. 18 September 1809. Jefferson hopes to visit Montpelier before JM returns to Washington and will make the trip if the health of his grandson Benjamin Franklin Randolph improves. Mrs. Thomas Mann Randolph, Jefferson’s daughter, will accompany him if the boy is sufficiently recovered (brief abstract in International Autographs Catalogue No. 5 [1954], item 140).
The difference between a communication & sollicitation is too obvious to need suggestion. While the latter adds to embarrasments, the former only enlarges the field of choice. The inclosed letters are merely communications. Of Stewart I know nothing. Price who recommends him is I believe a good man, not otherwise known to me than as a partner of B. Morgan of N. O. and as having several times...
M rs Lewis , the widow of Col o Nich Lewis , has requested me to mention to yourself the name of a mr Wood , an applicant for a commission in the army . on recieving the request I rode to her house to ask something about him, observing to her that something more than his name would be necessary. she candidly told me at once that he was a very capable young man, connected with her only as being...
The death of my much valued friend & relation George Jefferson will doubtless produce many competitors for the office of Consul at Lisbon. Among these a neighbor of mine, mr David Higginbotham wishes to be considered. He is a merchant of Milton, of very fair character, steady application to business, sound in his circumstances, and perfectly correct in all his conduct. He is a native of this...
This will be handed you by Mons r de Neufville a person of distinction from France who came over to this country with his family some years ago, & is established as an Agricultural citizen near New Brunswick in Jersey . he brought recommendations from some friends of mine which established his merit, as well as his right to any service I could render him. since his settlement in Jersey I have...
The inclosed papers will explain themselves. Their coming to me is the only thing not sufficiently explained. Your favor of the 3d. came duly to hand. Altho’ something of the kind had been apprehended, the embargo found the farmers and planters only getting their produce to market and selling as fast as they could get it there. I think it caught them in this part of the state with one third of...
Yours of yesterday was recieved last night. the M c Gehee who is the subject of it, is an overseer of mine at a place, which on account of it’s importance to me, mr Randolph takes care of. he employed M c Gehee , & solely superintends him. We consider him as an extremely industrious, active, attentive, and skilful in the old practices, but prejudiced against any thing he is not used to. we...
On my return from Bedford I found in our post office your favor of the 2d. inst. as also the inclosed letter from mr. Martin, formerly of N. C. recommended to us by mr. Blackledge. I dare say you will recollect more of him than I do. I remember that his being a native French man, educated I believe to the law there, very long a resident of this country and become a respectable lawyer with us,...
Yours of the 12th. has been duly recieved. I have much doubted whether, in case of a war, Congress would find it practicable to do their part of the business. That a body containing 100. lawyers in it, should direct the measures of a war is, I fear, impossible; and that thus that member of our constitution, which is it’s bulwark, will prove to be an impracticable one from it’s cacoethes...
This will be handed you by Monsr. de Neufville a person of distinction from France who came over to this country with his family some years ago, & is established as an Agricultural citizen near New Brunswick in Jersey. He brought recommendations from some friends of mine which established his merit, as well as his right to any service I could render him. Since his settlement in Jersey I have...
I have totally forgotten the writer of the letter I forward to you , and every circumstance of his case. I leave it therefore on his own letter and that of the Marquis de la Fayette to you, which came inclosed, and is now forwarded with the other. I shall set out for Bedford within three days, and expect to be absent as many weeks. the newspapers have begun the war for the European powers; but...
It is a grievous thing to be pressed, as I am, into the service of those who want to get into service themselves. The great mass of those sollicitations I decline: but some come forward on such grounds as controul compliance. Mr. Archibald C. Randolph, an applicant for command in the new army, is my near relation, which in his own eye and that of our common friends gives him a claim to my good...
Your letters of the 8 th 15 th and 22 d are now to be acknoleged. I should consider the debt to mr Hooe as made incumbent on us by the wish of our Donor, and shall chearfully acquiesce in any arrangement you make on that subject. I have accordingly suspended sending for my portion till further information from you. Dougherty’s bill shall be duly attended to. I have recieved a copy of Judge...
Another communication is inclosed, and the letter of the applicant is the only information I have of his qualifications. I barely remember such a person as the Secretary of mr. Adams & messenger to the Senate while I was of that body. It enlarges the sphere of choice by adding to it a strong federalist. The triangular war must be the idea of the Anglomen, and malcontents, in other words the...
Your favor of the 6th. was duly recieved. The double treachery of Henry will do lasting good both here & in England. It prostrates the party here, and will prove to the people of England, beyond the power of palliation by the ministry, that the war is caused by the wrongs of their own nation. The case of the Batture not having been explained by a trial at bar as had been expected, I have...
I had written the inclosed letter but had not yet sent it to the post office when mr. Nelson calling, informed me you were to leave Washington on Tuesday last (the 20th.) I have thought it better therefore to inclose it to you at Montpelier. I am laboriously employed in arranging the library, to be ready for it’s delivery. And as soon as I can name the day on which I shall have finished I will...
Yours of yesterday was recieved last night. The McGehee who is the subject of it, is an overseer of mine at a place, which on account of it’s importance to me, mr. Randolph takes care of. He employed McGehee, & solely superintends him. We consider him as extremely industrious, active, attentive, and skilful in the old practices, but prejudiced against any thing he is not used to. We have...
Your favor of the 6 th was duly recieved. the double treachery of Henry will do lasting good both here & in England . it prostrates the party here, and will prove to the people of England , beyond the power of palliation by the ministry, that the war is caused by the wrongs of their own nation. The case of the Batture not having been explained by a trial at bar as had been expected, I have...
I had intended to have been with you before this, but my daughter , who wishes to pay her respects to mrs Madison & yourself at the same time, has been confined by the illness of her youngest child . he has been mending for some days, but slowly, & from the nature of his complaint (visceral) it will be some days yet before she can leave him. I think therefore, on the departure of our present...
I inclose you two letters from mr Burrall , postmaster of Baltimore . you will percieve by them that the removal of mr Granger has spread some dismay in the ranks. I lodged in the same house with him (Francis’s) during the sessions of Congress of 97. 98. 99. we breakfasted, dined E t c at the same table. he classed himself with the federalists, but I did not know why, for he scarcely ever...
A letter from Col o Earle of S. C. induces me to apprehend that the government is called on to reimburse expences to which I am persuaded it is no wise liable either in justice or liberality. I inclose you a copy of my answer to him , as it may induce further enquiry, & particularly of Gen l Dearborn . the Tennisee Senators of that day can also give some information. We have not yet seen the...
I recieved at Richmond your favor covering a check on the bank of Norfolk for 743. Doll. 15. cents the balance in full of our accounts. I have learnt from P. Carr that under an idea that Rodney was about to resign, & on a desire expressed by mr R. Smith to him or some other person that Wirt should be sounded, it had been found that he would accept. I do not know whether it was communicated to...
The mail of yesterday does not tell us whether you have left Washington . I am this moment setting out for Bedford , & shall be absent 3. or 4. weeks. should you be at Monpelier when I return I shall certainly have the pleasure of paying my respects to mrs Madison & yourself. in the mean time accept the assurance of my affectionate esteem & respect RC ( MH : Hemenway Collection); at foot of...
Yours of Oct. 30. came to hand last night. Capt Coles passed this place on the 31st. to Washington. I gave a copy of the paper you desire to Thomas Monroe for his government; and, through him, another to Mayor Brent, that the city magistracy might understand what I considered as the limits separating our rights & duties. Capt Coles can borrow either of these probably for copying. Should they...
The difference between a communication & sollicitation is too obvious to need suggestion. while the latter embarras adds to embarrasments, the former only enlarges the field of choice. the inclosed letters are merely communications. of Stewart I know nothing. Price who recommends him is I believe a good man, not otherwise known to me than as a partner of B. Morgan of N. O. and as having...
You knew, I believe that the society of Agriculture of Paris had sent me a plough which they supposed the best ever ass made in Europe . they at the same time requested me to send them one of ours with my mould board. I have made one for them which every body agrees to be the ha d ndsomest & of the most promising appearance they have ever seen, and I have five at work on my own farms, than...
I have been prevented setting out to Bedford as early as I had counted. I depart tomorrow. In the mean time I have consulted with as many as I could of the leading men of our county on the subject of the Principal assessor, as I proposed in my letter of the 15th. Of those consulted who are known to yourself were mr. Divers, the mr. Carrs, mr. Randolph Bankhead Etc. One character has struck all...
The inclosed from Dr. Brown is this moment come to hand, and supposing it may possibly be of some importance I send it off immediately to the post office on the bare possibility it may get there in time for the mail of this morning. If it fails it will have to wait there 4. days longer. Ever affectly. yours FC ( MHi : Coolidge Collection). Enclosure not found, but see n. 1. Jefferson evidently...
Your two letters of the 4th. & 7th. were recieved by the last mail. I now inclose you the rough draught of the letter to the emperor of Russia. I think there must be an exact facsimile of it in the office, from which mr. Short’s must have been copied; because that the one now inclosed has never been out of my hands appears by there being no fold in the paper till now, and it is evidently a...
In my letter of yesterday I forgot to put the inclosed one from mr Mill, which I now send merely to inform you of his wishes, and to do on it what you find right. He is an excellent young man, modest, cautious & very manageable. His skill in architecture will be proved by his drawings & he has had a good deal of experience. He married a daughter of Colo. Smith of Winchester formerly (perhaps...
Mr. Thweatt my particular friend and connection expecting that an excursion he is to make will put it in his power to pay his respects to you personally, en passant, and being desirous to do so, I with pleasure present him to you as a gentleman of perfect worth, and of sincere zeal in those political principles which you & I have so steadily cultivated. His energy in their support has been...
In a letter of May 6. from Foronda is this passage. ‘ No remito a Vm exemplares de mis papelitos para el ilustrado y sabio Madison, aunque le tributo todos mis respetos: pero es Presidente, y las vilas almas, lexos de conocer que esto seria un acto de Cortesania que no tiene relacion con la presidencià, me tacharian tal vez de poco afecto à la patria, alegando que tenià consideraciones con...
I take the liberty of inclosing to you a letter from mr Meigs, heretofore President of the University of Georgia. This has been delayed by the same absence from home which prevented my having the pleasure of delivering it to you personally at Mon[t]pelier. I do not know mr Meigs personally, but have always heard him highly spoken of as a man of science. He was selected for the university of...
I recieved at Richmond your favor covering a check on the bank of Norfolk for 743. Doll. 15. cents the balance in full of our accounts. I have learnt from P. Carr that under an idea that Rodney was about to resign, & on a desire expressed by mr. R. Smith to him or some other person that Wirt should be sounded, it had been found that he would accept. I do not know whether it was communicated to...
The mail of yesterday does not tell us whether you have left Washington. I am this moment setting out for Bedford, & shall be absent 3. or 4. weeks. Should you be at Monpelier when I return I shall certainly have the pleasure of paying my respects to mrs. Madison & yourself. In the mean time accept the assurance of my affectionate esteem & respect RC ( MH ); FC ( DLC : Jefferson Papers).
I congratulate you on your release from the corvée of a session of Congress, and on the pleasure of revisiting your own fields & friends: and I hope your fields have been more fortunate than ours which have been wet but once since the 14th. of April, and present an aspect never seen since the year 1755. when we lost so many people by famine. But the present drought is only partial; that was...
In the action brought against me by Edward Livingston , the counsel employed, Wirt & Hay ( Wickham declining) desire me to furnish them with the grounds of defence, with as little delay as possible. the papers relating to the batture in the offices of State, the Treasury & war, will undoubtedly be needed to exhibit facts. not to I am now engaged on this subject, and not to give you unnecessary...
Mr. Wirt having suggested to me that he thought the explanations in my case of the Batture, respecting the Nile & Missisipi not sufficiently clear, and that the authority cited respecting the Nile might be urged against me, I have endeavored, by a Note, to state their analogies more clearly. Being a shred of the argument I put into your hands I inclose it to you with a request, after perusal,...
I have just time before closing the mail to send you the Memoir on the Batture. It is long; but it takes a more particular view of the legal system of Orleans & the peculiar river on which it lies, than may have before presented itself. However you can readily skip over uninteresting heads. My visit to you depends on the getting a new threshing machine to work: which I expect will permit me to...
I take the liberty of inclosing to you a letter from mr Meigs , heretofore President of the University of Georgia . this has been delayed by my the same absence from home which prevented my having the pleasure of delivering it to you personally at Monpelier . I do not know mr Meigs personally, but have always heard him highly spoken of as a man of science. he was selected for the university of...
Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the officer commanding at...
M r Thweatt my particular friend and connection expecting that an excursion he is to make will put it in his power to pay his respects to you personally, en passant, and being desirous to do so, I with pleasure present him to you as a gentleman of perfect worth, and of sincere zeal in those political principles which you & I have so steadily cultivated. his energy in their support has been...
On my return from a journey of 5 weeks to Bedford I found here the two letters now inclosed, which tho’ directed to me, belong in their matter to you. I never before heard of either writer and therefore leave them to stand on their own ground. I congratulate you on the close of your campaign . altho it has not conquered your difficulties, it leaves you more at leisure to examine consider &...
I have seen with very great concern the late Address of mr Smith to the public. he has been very ill advised both personally and publicly. as far as I can judge from what I hear, the impression made is entirely unfavorable to him. every man’s own understanding readily answers all the facts and insinuations , one only excepted, and for that they look for explanations without any doubt that they...
Mrs. Lewis, the widow of Colo. Nich Lewis, has requested me to mention to yourself the name of a mr. Wood, an applicant for a commission in the army. On recieving the request I rode to her house to ask something about him, observing to her that something more than his name would be necessary. She candidly told me at once that he was a very capable young man, connected with her only as being a...
I have just time before closing the mail to send you the Memoir on the Batture . it is long; but it takes a more particular view of the legal system of Orleans & the peculiar river on which it lies, than may have before presented itself. however you can readily skip over uninteresting heads. my visit to you depends on the getting a new threshing machine to work: which I expect will permit me...
However firm my resolution has been not to torment the government, nor be harrassed myself with sollicitations for office, cases will now and then arise which cannot be denied. Charles Jouett formerly of this neighborhood, was appointed by Genl Dearborne an Indian agent. This was on the sollicitations of W. C. Nicholas, mr. Carr & every respectable person of this neighborhood, and indeed from...
I returned yesterday from Bedford , and according to my letter written just before my departure, I take the liberty of informing you of it in the hope of seeing mrs Madison & yourself here. and I do it with the less delay as I shall ere long be obliged to return to that place.— by a letter of Aug. 15. from Gen l Dearborn he sais in a P.S. that he has just recieved information that Bidwell had...
In the action brought against me by Edward Livingston, the counsel employed, Wirt & Hay (Wickham declining) desire me to furnish them with the grounds of defence, with as little delay as possible. The papers relating to the batture in the offices of State, the Treasury & war, will undoubtedly be needed to exhibit facts. I am now engaged on this subject, and not to give you unnecessary trouble...