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[ Annapolis, 29 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “Capt Hutchins. Vocabulary for any Indian tribes.” Not found.]
[ Paris, 24 May 1786 . Entry in SJL reads: “T. Walpole. extract from Limozin’s letter.” Letter not found, but see Limozin to TJ, 21 May 1786 .]
[ Annapolis, 1–14 Feb. 1784 . Entry in SJL under date of 1 Feb. reads: “TMR. Phaeton—buy horse for me—keep eye on two others—give notice to Key to send for him [i.e., the purchased horse]—I will call on him [i.e., Randolph] in Spring—health—[…] Judy. P.S. of Feb. 14. health—news.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 10 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “T M Randolph. Tender of service—not buy horse—sell marquee.” Not found; the marquee evidently was one acquired in late May 1781 (see Vol. 6: 20–21).]
[ Annapolis, 23 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “TMR. Garden seeds—Pitt still in and parliament not dissolved—Luzerne going—Marb[ois] charg[é] d’aff[aires].” Not found.]
[ Paris, 15 Dec. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Mr. Barclay. Receipt of letter Nov. 19.—paiment of account to Mrs. Barclay—wine and tea still unpaid and unknown. 14 ℔ tea received but not the China—my American letters inclosed to him.” Not found, but see Barclay to TJ, 17 Nov. 1784 , incorrectly noted in SJL as dated 19 Nov.]
I have duly received your favor of the 24th. Aug. and think with you there should be no contest for the duty on the candles. I shall be ready to answer it to you whenever you please. I presume you have heard that New York has acceded to the new constitution. I have the honor to be Sir Your most obedt & most humble servt, PrC ( DLC ).
[ Paris, 29 Jan. 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Thos. Shore. Information that powers are given to treat with pyratical states but not ultimate orders.” Not found.]
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Mr. Rusten and begs the honor of his company to dinner on Tuesday next the 19th instant. RC (Raab Collection, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, 2018); addressed: “Monsr. Rusten Hotel d’Orleans, Palais royal”; wax seal affixed. Not recorded in SJL . According to Ruston’s diary, he dined with TJ on 19 Apr., at which time they discussed Great Britain’s trade policy ( DLC :...
[ Paris, 11 Nov. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Mr. Barclay. To send 2. casks brandy by Lemaire—write to me about China and tea and draw on me for money for those things and the wine and tea left here.” Not found, but see TJ to F. Eppes , this date, and Barclay to TJ, 17 Nov. 1784 .]
[ Paris, 7 Feb. 1786. Entry in SJL under this date, immediately under an entry for letter to Archibald Cary: “TMRandolph. do. by Lyons.” Not found.]
Congress do not grant their sea letters for the East-Indies but to ships belonging to citizens of the united states, and navigated by officers and seamen of the United states. Even the cargo must also belong to their own citizens. Nor can these letters be obtained but on an application to Congress themselves, whereupon they appoint a committee of their own body to enquire into the...
[ Annapolis, 2 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “TMR. Sailing of ratification Feb. 17—pacification of Turks and Russ.—resignation of N. and F. [North and Fox]—execution deed of Western country—ill accomodations here—phaeton—P. to Judy.” Not found.]
Your favor of Nov. 28. is now before me, and I thank you for your attention to my letters. My last news from Messrs. Short and Rutledge was of the 5th. of Dec. They were then well, at Venice, and within a day or two of their departure for Rome. Mr. and Mrs. Paradise are arrived here. I have no news from America since October. The great news of this country is the late decision of the court...
I am very sensible of the humanity and generosity which the merchants of Rochelle were so good as to interpose in behalf of the crew of the Clementina, and am very grateful for the aids they afforded. Congress have not been able as yet to make a regular appointment of Agents in the several ports of France because it is not till very lately that a Convention has been arranged for that purpose...
Your letter by Doctor Lyons has been safely delivered me. Mr. Short on his arrival here from Virginia had informed me that the young Mr. Randolphs were either gone or going to Edinburgh and since that I have received the same information from Doctor Currie in a letter. I consider that really as the best position in Europe for the acquisition of real science: and that it will be very...
I am sorry to hear, by letter from Mr. Elder, that your health is infirm, and that it is likely to become necessary on that account for yourself, your brother and cousin to remove to the continent of Europe. Edinburgh had the two advantages of possessing science in as high a degree as any place in the world, and of conveying it in your native tongue. Places may be found on the continent which...
I was honoured with your letter of Octob. 25. by Mr. Barrett: and am to thank you for an introduction to his acquaintance. The matter of the whale oil was settled before he came. I need not trouble you with the details of this however as I have written them to his Excellency Governor Bowdoin. The indulgence obtained is made temporary. I suppose this was done to give them an opportunity of...
The inclosed being part of a newspaper published here I thought you would like to see it, and therefore cut it out and inclose it. I have no doubt that the author of it has had you in view when he wrote it: and perhaps, when you return it may be worth while to see what he offers to shew. I have had conversations on your business since you left us, and find you will not be able to get a step...
[I am this moment favored with] yours of the 4th. instant. I had before received those of Sep. 17. and Dec. 11. The severity of the winter has been beyond all example in every part of France, even Marseilles. At Nice however it has been fine, and we do not learn that the cold has been remarkeable in any part of Italy. As health is your object, I should suppose there could be no question but...
Colo. Franks has occasion for money to carry him to London. As we propose that all the money for this business shall be procured by draughts on Mr. Adams, will it not be better for you to draw on him at present for enough to cover the last journey of Colo. Franks, to defray the present one, to pay for the articles to be purchased here, the expences of the future journey Southwardly &c.? All...
After the letter I did myself the honour of writing you to assure you that I would reimburse you the necessary expences for sending young Mercier to his own country, I took occasion in my first to the Governor of Virginia to mention your attention to him, and my undertaking, and to pray that he would endeavor to find out his family. I now receive a letter from the present governor , Mr....
Je m’empresse, Mademoiselle, de faire reponse à la lettre que vous me faites l’honneur de m’ecrire au sujet de Monsieur Blaine, et de vous observer que la meilleure partie à prendre, à ce qui me paroit, c’est d’écrire à Monsieur Barclay qui se trouve actuellement à Philadelphie. C’est probable que Monsieur Blaine y est aussi, et assurèment Monsieur Barclay fera son mieux pour vous faire payer...
Colo. Franks arrived some days ago with the Marocco treaty, and with your dispatches. I am persuaded they will give great satisfaction to Congress, and do you honor in their eyes. Colo. Franks waits for his baggage which he hourly expects. He will then proceed to London and from thence to New York. He carries duplicate ratifications of the treaty from me, which being also signed by Mr. Adams,...
In a former letter to Mr. Rutledge I suggested to him the idea of extending his tour to Constantinople, and in one of to-day I mention it again. I do not know how far that extension may accord with your plan, nor indeed how far it may be safe for either of you. For, tho’ it has been thought there has been a relaxation in the warlike dispositions of the belligerent powers, yet we have no...
I am honoured with your favor of Aug. 13. and shall always be glad to render you any service I can in your commerce and to hear of your success. Supposing that it may be interesting to you to be well informed on the question of war and peace, I take the liberty of informing you that tho’ the affairs of the Dutch had left hopes of accomodation, yet that the commencement of a war between the...
On my return from a tour through the Southern parts of France and Northern of Italy, I found here the present of books you had been so kind as to send me. I should value them highly for their intrinsic merit, but much more as coming from you. You will have seen that at length one of our republics has experienced those commotions which the newspapers have been always ascribing to all of them. I...
I received last night from Mr. Trumbull the account of the books you had sent me. The books themselves had arrived some time before. Among those not yet purchased you note Chandler’s debates at £9–9. I am glad you have not purchased it at that price, and will beg the favor of you to strike it out of my list altogether. I note below some others to be added to my list. I will thank you to send...
Your favour of April 14. 1787. gave me reason to hope we should have seen you here this winter. That being nearly passed over I am apprehensive you may have changed your plan. Or perhaps you have chosen first to finish those courses of lectures which are to make a part of your education. This is certainly wise, but I hope you will not be diverted altogether from your purpose of coming here. I...
The inclosed are part of some papers I wrote in answer to certain queries sent me by Monsr. de Marbois in 1781. Another foreigner of my acquaintance, now beyond the water, having asked a copy of them, I undertook to revise and correct them in some degree. There are still a great number of facts defective and some probably not to be depended on. Knowing nobody so able as yourself to set me...
Your favor of the 12th. came to hand two days ago. Your adversary had been busy here in endeavoring to have your privilege examined and withdrawn. They had, as I think, interested Mr. Eden, the British minister, and thro’ that or some other channel conveied a story to the ear of some of the ministers, very unfavorable to you. They had particularly represented some circumstance attending the...
I have duly received your favor of May 12. as well as that of the person who desires information on the state of Cotton manufactures in America, and for his interest and safety, I beg leave to address to you the answer to his queries, without naming him. In general it is impossible that manufactures should succeed in America from the high price of labour. This is occasioned by the great demand...
In the short time which I had the pleasure of being with you here, I forgot to ask the favor of you to take charge of some books for my nephew Peter Carr who is at Williamsburg. They are some which I desired Mr. Stockdale in Piccadilly opposite Burlington house to send to him the last year; but when I was in London he had not yet done it. I write the catalogue of them below and the dates of...
I have duly received your letter of Dec. 27 . inclosing the protest and two affidavits respecting the loss of your vessel. I have written to Messieurs Bouteiller, letting them know I shall be ready to render any service in the case I can with propriety, but recommending them to confer from time to time thereon with Mr. Carnes the American agent at Nantes, to whom I have also written desiring...
As the time of my departure approaches and I hear nothing from you as to my commission of Jan. 28. nor what remained of the former, I take the liberty of reminding you of them and of desiring you to send without delay what you can procure and to forward me your account that I may have it paid. With respect to the books which cannot be immediately found I shall hope you will continue to look...
At the time of the receipt of your favor of Octob. 24. the contract between the Farmers general and Mr. Morris for tobacco was concluded and in a course of execution. There was no room therefore on that account to offer the proposals which accompanied your letter. I was moreover engaged in endeavors to have the monopoly in the purchase of that article in this country suppressed. My hopes on...
I am much obliged by your favor of the 12th. The method you are so kind as to propose to me of being furnished with the English papers would be perfectly pleasing to me, if they come clear of French postage also, a circumstance which you do not particularly mention in your letter. I had written about a fortnight ago to Mr. Adams to order me the two best papers which the D. of Dorset was so...
I wrote you a fortnight ago an account of what had passed on your subject that day. Yesterday I had a long conference with M. de [ Rayneval ]. It is impossible for a person to be more cordially disposed than M. de Montmorin but opposition from another quarter of the [ sea ] and the difficulty of the case [ trouble ] him. [ Rayneval ] observed to me that there was no country in Europe but...
I have been honoured with your favour of May 29. and take the first possible moment of acknowleging it, and of inclosing such notes as my recollection has suggested to me might be of service to you on your route. They have been scribbled so hastily and so unformally that I would not send them, did not a desire of accomodating yourself and Mr. Rutledge get the better of my self love. You will...
I was honored a few days ago with the reciept of your letter of Aug. 11th. In my last to you I informed you that I had proposed to Mr. Adams to avail ourselves of your service at Algiers. I acknowlege that I had no expectation that with our small means you could effect a treaty there; but I thought that their ultimatum might be discovered and other intelligence obtained which might repay us...
The first article of the Arret of Dec. 29. permits expressly the importation of Spermaceti on paying the duty of 7 -10 the Quintal and 10. sols the livre, and the general laws of the kingdom allow the importation of cotton spun for cambric at 20 the Quintal. I should think it adviseable to tender these duties: if they demand any others, they should produce the law authorizing it. I suppose...
As you have acted, since my arrival in France, in the characters of Consul general for that country, and minister to the court of Marocco, and also as agent in some particular transactions for the state of Virginia, I think it a duty to yourself, to truth, and to justice, on your departure for America, to declare that in all these characters, as far as has come within my notice, you have acted...
I have duly received your favor of July 30. covering Mr. Huntington’s papers on the subject of the claim for depreciation on money advanced by him for some French prisoners. That the claim is substantially just is certain, but at the same time it is one which I cannot urge. You know it is established in practice with us not to give an account once settled and discharged, merely on a claim of...
I have now the honour to inclose you two introductory letters from the Chargé des affaires of Naples at this court (Mr. Pio) to his friends at Naples.—We have news from America as late as the middle of January. The elections for the new Congress were going on well and were generally in favor of federalists. Genl. Washington will unquestionably be president, and it is thought Mr. John Adams...
I have been recurring to your pamphlet (which I borrowed for that purpose) for the times at which the inundations begin and end in the Missouri, Missisipi, Illinois, Ohio, Wabache, but I do not find it mentioned there. Will you be so kind as to give me as accurate an account of these times as you can? Does the Tanissee overflow periodically? I suppose not. Will you give me leave to correct an...
I have duly received your favour announcing the departure of Mrs. Barclay, and assure you that it is with regret that we lose her here. She however will be happier in rejoining you. Far from her having been a troublesome neighbor to me as you suppose, I have been only able to assure her of my dispositions to be useful to her. Once only she has permitted me to accomodate her with the sum of...
I am now to acknowlege your separate favors of Dec. 4. and Jan. 6. and the joint one to Mr. Adams and myself of Jan. 6. This last has been communicated to Congress and to Mr. Adams. You have my full and hearty approbation of the treaty you obtained from Marocco, which is better and on better terms than I expected. Mr. Adams and myself have annexed our confirmation to two of the copies, one of...
[ Annapolis, 9 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “J. Key. Extract from my Cash book—additional instructions.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 22 Apr. 1784. For note on entry in SJL , see TJ to Elizabeth Wayles Eppes , this date. Not found.]
[[ Paris, 20 Sep. 1788 . Recorded in SJL Index. Not found.]]