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We have received your two letters of the 15th and 18th July from Alicant, and are sorry to learn that your indisposition discourages you from travelling by land or by sea. We still think it most advisable both for your own interest and that of the United States, that you should return to Congress for their further instructions as soon as possible, and we again propose to you to embark from...
Your favour of July 16. came duly to hand by mr[expansion sign] Trumbul. with respect to the whale oil, tho’ this country has shewn a desire to draw it hither, & for that purpose have reduced the duties to about four guineas on the English ton, yet I do not see a probability of a further reduction at this moment. it has been much pressed, & I expect every day to receive a final determination....
The inclosed came to hand this morning. mr[expansion sign] Carmichael you observe, and mr[expansion sign] Barclay suppose something may yet be done at Algiers. it remains for us to consider whether the conduct of the Dey of that country leaves any room to hope that any negotiator can succeed without a great addition to the price to which we are confined? and should we think in the negative,...
Your favour of July 31 was lately delivered me. the papers inform me you are at the Hague, and, incertain what stay you may make there, I send this by mr[expansion sign] Voss who is returning to London by the way of Amsterdam. I inclose you the last letters from mr[expansion sign] Barclay & mr[expansion sign] Carmichael, by which we may hope our peace with Marocco is signed, thanks to the good...
My last letter to you was dated the 27 th. of August, since which I have recieved yours of Sep. 11 th. The letter to M r. Lamb therein inclosed I immediately signed & forwarded. In mine wherein I had the honor of proposing to you the mission of M r. Barclay to Algiers, I mentioned that my expectations from it were of a subordinate nature only. I very readily therefore recede from it in...
Your favor of Sept. the 11 th. came to hand in due time & since that I have recieved the copies of the Prussian treaty you were so kind as to send me. I have recieved a short letter from M r. Barclay dated Cadiz Sep t. 25 th. only announcing his arrival there & that he should proceed immediately to Madrid. At this latter place he would meet my letter informing him that we did not propose any...
I formerly had the honour of mentioning to you the measures I had taken to have our commerce with this country put on a better footing; & you know the circumstances which had occasioned the articles of whale oil & tobacco to be first brought forward. latterly we got the committee, which had been established for this purpose, to take up the other articles, & on their report the king & council...
Col o. Franks will have the honor of delivering you the treaty with the emperor of Marocco, & all it’s appendages. you will perceive by mr[expansion sign] Barclay’s letters that it is not necessary that any body should go back to Marocco to exchange ratifications. he sais however that it will be necessary that Fennish receive some testimony that we approve the treaty; and as, by the acts of...
Your favors by Colo. Franks have come safely to hand. he will set out from hence the 8th. inst. the packet being to sail from Havre the 10th. I inclose you the copy of a letter lately received from mr Barclay, & of the paper it inclosed. in a letter from mr Carmichael is a postscript dated Dec. 25. in the following words ’since writing the preceeding, the Portuguese Ambassador has pressed me...
As I propose to write you on business by Mr Cairnes who will set out in a few days for London, the object of the present letter is only to inform you that the Count de Vergennes died yesterday morning & that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor: and further to beg the favor of you to forward the inclosed by the first vessel from London. I set out on my journey on Sunday the 18th....
I am now to acknoledge the receipt of your favor of Jan. 25. Colo. Franks sailed in the packet of this month from Havre for New York. this arrangement of the packets opens a direct communication between Paris & America, and if we succeed as I expect we shall in getting Honfleur made a freeport, I hope to see that place become the deposit for our Whale oil, rice, tobacco & furs, & that from...
The Notables met yesterday. the king opened the assembly with a short speech, wherein he expressed his inclination to consult with them on the affairs of his kingdom, to receive their opinions on the plans he had digested, and to endeavor to imitate the head of his family Henry IV. whose name is so dear to the nation. the speech was affectionate. the Guarde des sceaux spoke about 20 minutes,...
The inclosed letter is come to hand since I had the honour of addressing you last. will you be so good as to forward a copy to Mr. Jay? the assembly of Notables is held to secrecy, so that little transpires and this floats among so much incertain matter that we know not what can be depended on. 80. millions more of annual revenue and provincial assemblies are the certain objects. the giving to...
I returned about three weeks ago from a very useless voiage, useless, I mean, as to the object which first suggested it, that of trying the effect of the mineral waters of Aix en Provence on my hand. I tried these because recommended among six or eight others as equally beneficial, & because they would place me at the beginning of a tour to the seaports of Marseilles, Bourdeaux, Nantes &...
I have been duly honoured with your’s of the 10th inst. and am happy to hear of the success of your journey to Amsterdam. there can be no doubt of it’s ratification by Congress. would to heaven they would authorize you to take measures for transferring the debt of this country to Holland before you leave Europe. most especially is it necessary to get rid of the debt to the officers. their...
Frouillé, the bookseller here who is engaged in having your book translated and printed, understanding that you were about publishing a sequel to it, has engaged me to be the channel of his prayers to you to favor his operation by transmitting hither the sheets of the sequel as they shall be printed; & he will have them translated by the same hand, which is a good one. It is necessary for me...
I take the liberty of troubling you with the inclosed bill of exchange for £46-17-10 sterling, rather than engage mrs Smith in so disagreeable a business. it will arrive in Time I hope to cover the one drawn by General Sullivan on Colo. Smith, that certainly ought not to have been involved in the business.— the Parliament are obstinately decided against the stamp tax. their last remonstrance...
Since your favor of July 10, mine have been of July 17. 23 & 28. the last inclosed a bill of exchange from mr Grand on Tessier for £46-17-10 sterl. to answer Genl. Sullivan’s bill for that sum. I hope it got safe to hand, tho’ I have been anxious about it as it went by post and my letters thro’ that channel sometimes miscarry. From the separation of the Notables to the present moment has been...
I received your favors by Mr. Cutting, and thank you sincerely for the copy of your book. the departure of a packet-boat, which always gives me full employment for some time before, has only permitted me to look into it a little. I judge of it from the first volume which I thought formed to do a great deal of good. the first principle of a good government is certainly a division distribution...
This will be delivered you by young mr Rutledge. Your knowledge of his father will introduce him to your notice. he merits it moreover on his own account. I am now to acknolege your favors of Oct. 8. & 26. that of August 25 was duly received, nor can I recollect by what accident I was prevented from acknoleging it in mine of Sep. 28. It has been the source of my subsistance hitherto, & I must...
In the month of July I received from Fiseaux & Co. of Amsterdam a letter notifying me that the principal of their loan to the United States would become due the first day of January. I answered them that I had neither powers nor information on the subject but would transmit their letter to the Board of Treasury. I did so by the packet which sailed from Havre Aug 10. The earliest answer...
I wrote you on the 12th instant, that is to say, by the last post. But as that channel of conveiance is sometimes unfaithful I now inclose you a copy of my letter of that date, and of the one Fiseaux & Co. inclosed in that. I have since received my letters by the packet, but, among them, nothing from the Board of Treasury. Still their orders may be among the dispatches with which Paul Jones is...
Mr. Parker furnishes me an opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your favors of Nov. 10. Dec. 6. 10. 18. & 25, Which I avoid doing thro post. The orders on the subject of our captives at Algiers have come to me by the last packet. They are to be kept secret even from the captives themselves, lest a knolege of the interference of government should excite too extravagent demands. The...
I informed you in my letter of the 31st. of December of the measures I had taken relative to the reimbursement of the 51,000 gelders to Fizeaux & co. to wit, that I had asked the Willincks and Van Staphorsts to pay the interest, & written to the board of treasury for their orders as to the principal. I inclose you a letter just received from Fizeaux & co. now Hugguer, Grand & co. by which you...
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks & Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
I am in hopes daily of receiving a letter from you in answer to my last. the delay of letters which contained the proposition to the board of treasury takes away all probability of their answering in time, and I foresee that I shall be closely pressed by circumstances on that point. I have settled your matter with de la Blancherie, at the sum you fixed. (8 Louis) he demanded 12, but without a...
I received this day a letter from mrs Adams of the 26th. ult. informing me you would set out on the 29th. for the Hague. our affairs at Amsterdam press on my mind like a mountain. I have no information to go on but that of the Willincks & Van Staphorsts, & according to that something seems necessary to be done. I am so anxious to confer with you on this, & to see you & them together, & get...
I have received with a great deal of pleasure the account of your safe arrival and joyful reception at Boston. mr Cutting was so kind as to send me a copy of the address of the assembly to you & your answer, which with the other circumstances I have sent to have published in the gazette of Leyden, and in a gazette here. it will serve to shew the people of Europe that those of America are...
I had the pleasure of writing to you on the 2d. of Aug. and of adding a P. S. of Aug. 6. You will have known since that that the interposition of Denmark, as auxiliary to Russia against Sweden, has been suppressed magisterially by England and Prussia. This seemed to prove that these two powers did not mean to enter into the war; that on the contrary they wished seriously to quiet things on the...
I now do myself the pleasure to inclose to you a copy of the Arret explanatory of that of Sep. 28 on the subject of our whale oils. mr Necker in a letter to me has renewed the promise of taking off the 10.sous per livre at the end of the next year. but at the same time he observes that whenever the national fishery shall be able to supply their demand for whale oil we must expect a repeal of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Supposing that Congress would communicate to you directly the powers committed to yourself, mr. Adams & myself, I have delayed from day to day the honour of writing to you, in hopes that every day would open to me a certainty of the time & place at which I might sail: a French packet will leave N. York early in the next month. By her I mean to take my...
Your favor of the 3d is this moment put into my hands, and as the post does not usually stay here above an hour, it leaves me time to scribble a few lines only, scarcely admitting them to be prefaced with an acknowlegement of the pleasure it will give me to be permitted to communicate with you occasionnally. we received dispatches from Europe yesterday, by Capt. Barney. there is no news but in...
Since my last nothing new has occurred. I suppose the crippled state of Congress is not new to you. we have only 9 states present, 8 of whom are represented by two members each, and of course, on all great questions not only an unanimity of states but of members is necessary, an unanimity which never can be obtained on a matter of any importance, the consequence is that we are wasting our time...
Your servant delivered me your favor this morning; Capt. Barney is gone to Philadelphia and his vessel to Baltimore, having left with me one of your packages only. the persons who brought this could give me no certain account of the other package which you suppose to have been brought. this your servant now receives. Being obliged to seize a moment in Congress of writing you these few lines, I...
I am obliged to you for your query as to the distance from New York to Cayahoga, as it has occasioned my reexamination of that matter & detection of an error of 150 miles. the distances from New York to Niagara I collect from information as follows. from N. York to Albany  164 miles Oneida  165 Oswego  171 Niagara  180 680 from Niagara to Cayahoga 140 820 This last distance [from Niagara to...
I received your favor of the 8th inst. by Colo. Harrison. the subject of it is interesting, and, so far as you have stood connected with it, has been matter of anxiety to me: because whatever may be the ultimate fate of the institution of the Cincinnati, as in it’s course it draws to it some degree of disapprobation I have wished to see you stand on ground separated from it; & that the...
Every thing on this side the water seems to indicate a certainty of war. the Emperor seems decided in not receding from the right to navigate the Scheld; & the Dutch as determined not to yeild it. I suppose that this court & that of Berlin will take part with the Dutch, the Turks of course become parties in a war against the Emperor: & it seems as probable that the Empress of Russia will join...
Mr Houdon would much sooner have had the honour of attending you but for a spell of sickness which long gave us to despair of his recovery & from which he is but recently recovered. he comes now for the purpose of lending the aid of his art to transmit you to posterity. he is without rivalship in it, being employed from all parts of Europe in whatever is capital. he has had a difficulty to...
Permit me to add, what I forgot in my former letter, a request to you to be so kind as to communicate to me what you can recollect of Bushnel’s experiments in submarine navigation during the late war, and whether you think his method capable of being used successfully for the destruction of vessels of war. It’s not having been actually used for this purpose by us, who were so peculiarly in...
I have been honoured with your letter of Sep. 26 which was delivered me by Mr Houdon, who is safely returned. he has brought with him the mould of the face only, having left the other parts of his work, with his workmen to come by some other conveiance. Doctor Franklin, who was joined with me in the superintendance of this just monument, having left us before what is called the costume of the...
A conversation with the Count de Rochambeau yesterday obliges me to write a supplementary letter to that of the 4th instant. he informs me that he has had applications for paiment from the person who furnished the badges for the Cincinnati, as well the Americans as French. that this person informed him they were not paid for, that he had furnished them indeed on the application of major...
The house of Le Coulteux, which for centuries has been the wealthiest of this place, has it in contemplation to establish a great company for the fur trade. they propose that partners interested one half in the establishment should be American citizens, born & residing in the U.S. yet if I understood them rightly they expect that that half of the company which resides here should make the...
I was happy to find by the letter of Aug. 1 1786 which you did me the honour to write me, that the modern dress for your statue would meet your approbation. I found it strongly the sentiment of West, Copeley, Trumbul & Brown in London, after which it would be ridiculous to add that it was my own. I think a modern in an antique dress as just an object of ridicule as an Hercules or Marius with a...
I am honoured with your Excellency’s letter by the last packet & thank you for the information it contained on the communication between the Cayahoga & Big beaver. I have ever considered the opening a canal between those two watercourses as the most important work in that line which the state of Virginia could undertake. it will infallibly turn thro the Patowmack all the commerce of Lake Erie...
Your favor of Aug. 31. came to hand yesterday; and a confidential conveiance offering, by the way of London, I avail myself of it to acknolege the receipt. I have seen, with infinite pleasure, our new constitution accepted by 11 states, not rejected by the 12th and that the 13th happens to be a state of the least importance. it is true that the minorities in most of the accepting states have...
I this moment discover that I have dated my letter of yesterday Nov. 4. instead of Dec. 4. tho’ the letter be gone out of my hands I hope the present will reach the bearer of it in time to accompany that, and to prevent the embarrasment of dates which it might otherwise occasion. I have only to repeat assurances of the sentiments of esteem & respect with which I have the honor to be Your...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover addressed to “James Madison junr. esq. Orange. to the care of mr Jas. Maury Fredericksburg.” Docketed by JM, “Ths. Jefferson Dec 11. 1783.” Your determination to avail yourself of the fine weather proved I fear a very unfortunate one. I pitied your probable situation in the tempestuous season which immediately succeeded your departure. it is now above a...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. Docketed by JM, “Thos. Jefferson Jan 1 1784.” Beneath the docket appears in an unknown hand, “Buffons theory respecting the Globe.” Your favour of the 10th. Dec. came to hand about a fortnight after its date. It has occasioned me to reflect a little more attentively on Buffon’s central heat than I did in the moment of our conversation and to form an...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Jefferson’s hand. Docketed by JM, “Thos. Jefferson. Feb 20th. 1784.” The italicized words are those written in the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2. Your favour of the 11th. inst. came to hand this day. I had prepared a multitude of mem[orandu]ms of subjects whereon to write you, but I will first answer those arising from your letter. by the time my order got...
I received yesterday by mr. Maury your favor of Feb. 17. That which you mention to have written by post a few days before is not yet come to hand. I am induced to this quick reply to the former by an alarming paragraph in it, which is that Mazzei is coming to Annapolis. I tremble at the idea. I know he will be worse to me than a return of my double quotidian head-ach. There is a resolution...