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Your favour of July 31. was lately delivered me. the papers inform me you are at the Hague, and, incertain what stay you may make there, I send this by mr̃ Voss who is returning to London by the way of Amsterdam. I inclose you the last letters from mr̃ Barclay & mr̃ Carmichael, by which we may hope our peace with Marocco is signed, thanks to the good offices of a nation which is honest, if it...
Your favor of the 5th. came to hand yesterday, and Colo. Smith and Colo. Humphries (by whom you will receive one of the 19th. from me) being to set out tomorrow, I hasten to answer it. I sincerely rejoice that Portugal is stepping forward in the business of treaty, and that there is a probability that we may at length do something under our commissions which may produce a solid benefit to our...
Your favors of the 13th. and 20th. were put into my hands today. This will be delivered you by Mr. Dalrymple, secretary to the legation of Mr. Craufurd. I do not know whether you were acquainted with him here. He is a young man of learning and candor, and exhibits a phaenomenon I never before met with, that is, a republican born on the North side of the Tweed . You have been consulted in the...
Frouillé, the bookseller here who is engaged in having your book translated and printed, understanding that you were about publishing a sequel to it, has engaged me to be the channel of his prayers to you to favor his operation by transmitting hither the sheets of the sequel as they shall be printed; and he will have them translated by the same hand, which is a good one. It is necessary for me...
Baron Polnitz not going off till today enables me to add some information which I receive from Mr. Barclay this morning. You know the immense amount of Beaumarchais’ accounts with the U.S. and that Mr. Barclay was authorized to settle them. Beaumarchais had pertinaciously insisted on settling them with Congress. Probably he received from them a denial: for just as Mr. Barclay was about to set...
My last to you was of the 2 d. inst. since which I have received yours of the 3 d. and 7 th. I informed you in mine of the substance of our letter to Baron Thulemeyer. last night came to hand his acknolegement of the receipt of it. he accedes to the method proposed for signing, and has forwarded our dispatch to the king. I inclose you a copy of our letter to mr Jay to go by the packet of this...
This will be delivered you by young Mr. Rutledge. Your knowledge of his father will introduce him to your notice. He merits it moreover on his own account. I am now to acknolege your favors of Oct. 8 and 26 . That of August 25. was duly received, nor can I recollect by what accident I was prevented from acknoleging it in mine of Sep. 28. It has been the source of my subsistence hitherto, and...
In my letter of the 11 th. instant I had the honour of inclosing you copies of letters relative to the Barbary affairs. others came to hand three days ago, of some of which I now send you copies, & of the others the originals. by these you will perceive that mr̃ Randall and mr̃ Lamb were at Madrid, that the latter means to return to Alicant & send on a courier to us. mr̃ Randall does not...
I returned about three weeks ago from a very useless voiage. Useless, I mean, as to the object which first suggested it, that of trying the effect of the mineral waters of Aix en Provence on my hand. I tried these because recommended among six or eight others as equally beneficial, and because they would place me at the beginning of a tour to the seaports of Marseilles, Bourdeaux, Nantes and...
I formerly had the honour of mentioning to you the measures I had taken to have our commerce with this country put on a better footing; and you know the circumstances which had occasioned the articles of whale oil and tobacco to be first brought forward. Latterly we got the committee, which had been established for this purpose, to take up the other articles, and on their report the King and...
Doctr. Franklin sets out this morning for Havre from whence he is to cross over to Cowes there to be taken on board Capt. Truxen’s ship bound from London to Philadelphia. The Doctor’s baggage will be contained in 150. or 200 boxes &c. We doubt that the laws of England will not permit these things to be removed from one vessel into another; and it must be attended with great difficulty, delay...
The Notables met yesterday. The king opened the assembly with a short speech, wherein he expressed his inclination to consult with them on the affairs of his kingdom, to receive their opinions on the plans he had digested, and to endeavor to imitate the head of his family Henry IV. whose name is so dear to the nation. The speech was affectionate. The Guarde des sceaux spoke about 20 minutes,...
Since your favor of July 10, mine have been of July 17. 23 & 28. the last inclosed a bill of exchange from mr Grand on Tessier for £46-17-10 sterl. to answer Genl. Sullivan’s bill for that sum. I hope it got safe to hand, tho’ I have been anxious about it as it went by post and my letters thro’ that channel sometimes miscarry. From the separation of the Notables to the present moment has been...
I received this day a letter from mrs Adams of the 26th. ult. informing me you would set out on the 29th. for the Hague. our affairs at Amsterdam press on my mind like a mountain. I have no information to go on but that of the Willincks & Van Staphorsts, & according to that something seems necessary to be done. I am so anxious to confer with you on this, & to see you & them together, & get...
Your favours of May 23. and the two of May 27. came safely to hand, the first being open. that of the 22 d. from Montreuil sur mer had been received and answered on the 25 th. The day before the receipt of the letters of the 27 th. we had had your cases brought to the barrier of Paris in order to get the proper officer to go that far to plumb them. From there they were put on board the boat...
My last letter to you was dated the 27 th. of August, since which I have recieved yours of Sep. 11 th. — The letter to m r. Lamb therein inclosed I immediately signed & forwarded. In mine wherein I had the honor of proposing to you the mission of m r. Barclay to Algiers, I mentioned that my expectations from it were of a subordinate nature only. I very readily therefore recede from it in...
In my letter of the 11th. instant I had the honour of inclosing you copies of letters relative to the Barbary affairs. Others came to hand three days ago, of some of which I now send you copies, and of the others the originals. By these you will perceive that Mr. Randall and Mr. Lamb were at Madrid, that the latter means to return to Alicant and send on a courier to us. Mr. Randall does not...
Your favors of July 16. and 18. came to hand the same day on which I had received Baron Thulemeier’s inclosing the ultimate draught for the treaty. as this draught, which was in French, was to be copied into the two instruments which Doct r. Franklin had signed, it is finished this day only. mr̃ Short sets out immediately. I have put into his hands a letter of instructions how to conduct...
Our instructions relative to the Barbary states having required us to proceed by way of negotiation to obtain their peace, it became our duty to do this to the best of our power. Whatever might be our private opinions, they were to be suppressed, and the line marked out to us, was to be followed. It has been so honestly, and zealously. It was therefore never material for us to consult together...
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks and Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
I had just closed the preceding letter when M. de Blumendorf the Imperial Secretary of legation called on me with the answer to Doct r. Franklin. it was that of Sep. 28. 1784 which you remember as well as myself, wherein Count Merci informed us the Emperor was disposed to enter into commercial arrangements with us & that he would give orders to the Government of the Austrian Netherlands to...
Your letter of the 10th. came safely to hand and I delivered the one therein inclosed to Mr. Grand. It was a duplicate of one he had before received. You will have heard of the safe arrival of Doctr. Franklin in America. Strange we do not hear of that of Otto and Doradour. If you know of the safe arrival of the packet in which they went, pray communicate it to me, as Madame de Doradour, who is...
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks & Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
I inclose you the copy of a letter received from mr[expansion sign] Barclay dated Cadiz May 23. by which you will perceive he was still on this side the Mediterranean. has mr[expansion sign] Lamb written to you? I hear nothing from him nor of him, since mr[expansion sign] Carmichael’s information of his arrival in Spain. mr[expansion sign] Randall gave reason to expect that himself would come...
As I propose to write you on business by Mr Cairnes who will set out in a few days for London, the object of the present letter is only to inform you that the Count de Vergennes died yesterday morning & that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor: and further to beg the favor of you to forward the inclosed by the first vessel from London. I set out on my journey on Sunday the 18th....
Our instructions relative to the Barbary states having required us to proceed by way of negotiation to obtain their peace, it became our duty to do this to the best of our power. whatever might be our private opinions, they were to be suppressed, and the line marked out to us, was to be followed. it has been so honestly, & zealously. it was therefore never material for us to consult together...
I returned about three weeks ago from a very useless voiage, useless, I mean, as to the object which first suggested it, that of trying the effect of the mineral waters of Aix en Provence on my hand. I tried these because recommended among six or eight others as equally beneficial, & because they would place me at the beginning of a tour to the seaports of Marseilles, Bourdeaux, Nantes &...
Supposing that you would receive from Congress a direct communication of the powers given to yourself, Doct r. Franklin & myself, I have deferred from day to day writing to you, in hopes that every day would open to me a certainty of the time & place of my departure for the other side of the Atlantic. Paris being my destination I have thought it best to enquire for a passage to France...
The inclosed letter is come to hand since I had the honour of addressing you last. Will you be so good as to forward a copy to Mr. Jay? The assembly of Notables is held to secrecy, so that little transpires and this floats among so much incertain matter that we know not what can be depended on. 80. millions more of annual revenue and provincial assemblies are the certain objects. The giving to...
Your favour of July 16. came duly to hand by mr[expansion sign] Trumbul. with respect to the whale oil, tho’ this country has shewn a desire to draw it hither, & for that purpose have reduced the duties to about four guineas on the English ton, yet I do not see a probability of a further reduction at this moment. it has been much pressed, & I expect every day to receive a final determination....
Your favors by Colo. Franks have come safely to hand. He will set out from hence the 8th. inst. the packet being to sail from Havre the 10th. I inclose you the copy of a letter lately received from Mr. Barclay, and of the paper it inclosed. In a letter from Mr. Carmichael is a postscript dated Dec. 25. in the following words ‘since writing the preceding, the Portuguese Ambassador has pressed...
My last to you was of the 2d. inst. since which I have received yours of the 3d. and 7th. I informed you in mine of the substance of our letter to Baron Thulemeyer. Last night came to hand his acknolegement of the receipt of it. He accedes to the method proposed for signing, and has forwarded our dispatch to the king. I inclose you a copy of our letter to Mr. Jay to go by the packet of this...
Mr. Mazzei, during the war was employed by the state of Virginia to procure them loans of money in Europe. He thinks that in allowing him for his expences they have allowed less than they actually were. You knew him in Paris, and knew of the journies which he made. I would thank you for the best guess you can make of what his expences may have been, according to the stile in which you observed...
I informed you in my letter of the 31st. of December of the measures I had taken relative to the reimbursement of the 51,000 gelders to Fizeaux & co. to wit, that I had asked the Willincks and Van Staphorsts to pay the interest, and written to the board of treasury for their orders as to the principal. I inclose you a letter just received from Fizeaux & Co. now Hugguer, Grand & Co. by which...
I inclose you the copy of a letter received from mr̃ Barclay dated Cadiz May 23. by which you will perceive he was still on this side the Mediterranean. has mr̃ Lamb written to you? I hear nothing from him nor of him, since mr̃ Carmichael’s information of his arrival in Spain. mr̃ Randall gave reason to expect that himself would come on. yet neither himself nor any letters from him arrive....
Your letter of the 22d. from Montreuil sur mer is put into my hands this moment, and having received information of your son, and two American gentlemen being to set out for London tomorrow morning, I seize a moment to inform you that he had arrived well at l’Orient and was well on the 20th. when the packet was still detained by contrary winds. Mr. Barclay, who is arrived, had also seen him....
This will be delivered you by young mr Rutledge. Your knowledge of his father will introduce him to your notice. he merits it moreover on his own account. I am now to acknolege your favors of Oct. 8. & 26. that of August 25 was duly received, nor can I recollect by what accident I was prevented from acknoleging it in mine of Sep. 28. It has been the source of my subsistance hitherto, & I must...
Your favor of Sept. the 11 th. came to hand in due time & since that I have recieved the copies of the Prussian treaty you were so kind as to send me. I have recieved a short letter from M r. Barclay dated Cadiz Sep t. 25 th. only announcing his arrival there & that he should proceed immediately to Madrid. At this latter place he would meet my letter informing him that we did not propose any...
In the month of July I received from Fiseaux & co. of Amsterdam a letter notifying me that the principal of their loan to the United states would become due the first day of January. I answered them that I had neither powers nor information on the subject, but would transmit their letter to the Board of treasury. I did so by the packet which sailed from Havre Aug. 10. The earliest answer...
I am honored with yours of Jan. 19. mine of Jan. 12. had not I suppose at that time got to your hands as the receipt of it is unacknoleged. I shall be anxious till I receive your answer to it. I was perfectly satisfied, before I received your letter, that your opinion had been misunderstood or misrepresented in the case of the Chevalier de Mezieres. your letter however will enable me to say so...
Colo. Franks and Mr. Randolph [Randall] arrived last night. This enables me to send copies of all the Barbary papers to Congress by the Mr. Fitzhughs, together with the Prussian treaty. They wait till tomorrow for this purpose. Considering the treaty with Portugal as among the most important to the U.S. I some time ago took occasion at Versailles to ask the Portuguese Ambassador if he had yet...
I am now to acknoledge the receipt of your favor of Jan. 25. Colo. Franks sailed in the packet of this month from Havre for New York. this arrangement of the packets opens a direct communication between Paris & America, and if we succeed as I expect we shall in getting Honfleur made a freeport, I hope to see that place become the deposit for our Whale oil, rice, tobacco & furs, & that from...
We duly received your letter of the 20 th of June, and now in consequence thereof send you a draught of a treaty which we should be willing to have proposed to the court of London. We have taken for our groundwork the original draught proposed to Denmark, making such alterations & additions only as had occurred in the course of our negociations with Prussia & Tûscany and which we thought were...
I wrote to you on the 11th. of Octob. by Mr. Preston and again on the 18th. of the same month by post. Since that yours of Sep. 25. by Mr. Boylston, Oct. 24. Nov. 1. and Nov. 4. have come safe to hand. I will take up their several subjects in order. Boylston’s object was first to dispose of a cargo of sperma ceti oyl which he brought to Havre. A secondary one was to obtain a contract for...
I was honoured yesterday with yours of the 24th. instant. When the 1st. article of our instructions of May 7. 1784. was under debate in Congress , it was proposed that neither party should make the other pay in their ports greater duties than they paid in the ports
Your favor of Sept. the 11 th. came to hand in due time & since that I have recieved the copies of the Prussian treaty you were so kind as to send me. I have recieved a short letter from m r. Barclay dated Cadiz Sep t. 25 th. only announcing his arrival there & that he should proceed immediately to Madrid. At this latter place he would meet my letter informing him that we did not propose any...
I now do myself the pleasure to inclose to you a copy of the Arret explanatory of that of Sep. 28 on the subject of our whale oils. mr Necker in a letter to me has renewed the promise of taking off the 10.sous per livre at the end of the next year. but at the same time he observes that whenever the national fishery shall be able to supply their demand for whale oil we must expect a repeal of...
I formerly had the honour of mentioning to you the measures I had taken to have our commerce with this country put on a better footing; & you know the circumstances which had occasioned the articles of whale oil & tobacco to be first brought forward. latterly we got the committee, which had been established for this purpose, to take up the other articles, & on their report the king & council...
I wrote you last on the 23 d. of May. your favor of that date did not come to hand till the 19 th. of June. in consequence of it I wrote the next day letters to mr[expansion sign] Lamb & mr[expansion sign] Randall, copies of which I have now the honour to inclose you. in these you will perceive I had desired mr[expansion sign] Randall, who was supposed to be at Madrid, to return immediately to...
I hear of a conveyance which allows me but a moment to write to you. I inclose a copy of a letter from Mr. Lamb. I have written both to him and Mr. Randall agreeable to what we had jointly thought best. The Courier de l’Europe gives us strange news of armies marching from the U.S. to take the posts from the English. I have received no public letters and not above one or two private ones from...