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Mr. Barclay will deliver you this letter in his way to Morocco. We have appointed him to this negotiation in hopes of obtaining the friendship of that State to our country, and of opening by that means the commerce of the Mediterranean, an object of sufficient importance to induce him to accept of the trust. We recommend him and Colo. Franks who goes with him to your attention and assistance,...
M r. Barclay will deliver you this letter in his way to Morocco. We have appointed him to this negotiation in hopes of obtaining the friendship of that State to our country, & of opening by that means the commerce of the Mediterranean, an object of sufficient importance to induce him to accept of the trust We recommend him & Col o. Franks who goes with him to your attention & assistance, and...
Your Favour of the 24 th: of Jan y. did not reach me, untill two Days ago. I communicated the Observations, inclosed in it, immediately to my Colleagues, who will transmit you our Answers, as soon as Health, and other Circumstances will admit. I have communicated to them also, your personal and confidential observations to me. They will have great Weight as they ought to have. I am weary of...
While M. hartley was here as Minister from the Court of Great Britain, we had the honour of mentioning to him that we were instructed by the Congress to treat on Some points distinct from any regulations of Commerce He Communicated this to his Court & the very Satisfactory answer which he received & made to us of its good disposition & willingness to receive & consider any propositions that...
In our last of Dec r. 15 we had the honour of communicating to Congress our letter to the Ambassador of Portugal which accompanied the draught of the treaty of Amity & Commerce proposed on our part. Since that date he addressed to us the letter N o. 1. acknowledging the receipt of ours & informing us that he had forwarded it to his court. The Baron de Thulemeier also, the Prussian Minister at...
The Congress of the United States of America after the conclusion of that war which established their freedom & independance, & after the cares which were first necessary for the restoration of order & regular government, turned their attention in the first moment possible to the connections which it would be proper to form with the nations on this side the Atlantic for the maintenance of...
To all to whom these Presents shall come or, be may be made known. Whereas the United States of America in Congress Assembled, reposing special trust & confidence in the integrity prudence & ability of their trusty & well-beloved the Hon ble John Adams late one of their Ministers Plenipotentiary for negotiating a peace, and heretofore a Delegate in Congress from the State of Massachusetts &...
We have received information that two American vessels, the Dauphin from Philadelphia & and the Maria from Boston with their Crews & Cargoes have lately been taken by the Algerines off the coast of Portugal, & that the crews are reduced to slavery. Our full powers to that State being for the general purpose only of concluding a treaty of Amity & Commerce, the redemption of our citizens made...
Soon after the arrival of M r. Jefferson in London, We had a conference with the Ambassador of Tripoli, at His House. The amount of all the Information we could obtain from him was that a perpetual peace was in all respects the most adviseable, because a temporary treaty would leave room for increasing demands upon every renewal of it and a stipulation for annual payments, would be liable to...
We have received the Extract of the letter from Monsieur de Sa of the 24 th Oct r 1784 which your Excellency was pleased to send us by the hand of the Secretary of your legation. “That in consequence of our letter your Excellency might assure us that Her Most faithful Majesty will be very glad to have the best correspondence with the United States, and that we may explain to your Excellency...
We have received your letter of the 16 th. of Nov r. wherein you are pleased to inform us that you had communicated to His Royal Highness the Grand Duke of Tuscany the overtures we had the honour of making for the establishment of a treaty of Amity & Commerce between the Subjects of His Royal Highness & the Citizens of the United States of America; that these were agreeable to him, and that...
12I. Commission, 11 October 1785 (Jefferson Papers)
To all to whom these Presents shall come or, may be made known. Whereas the United States of America in Congress Assembled, reposing special trust and confidence in the integrity, prudence and ability of their trusty and well-beloved the Honble. John Adams late one of their Ministers Plenipotentiary for negotiating a peace, and heretofore a Delegate in Congress from the State of Massachusetts...
We have received information that two American vessels, the Dauphin from Philadelphia and the Maria from Boston with their crews and cargoes have lately been taken by the Algerines off the coast of Portugal and that the crews are reduced to slavery. Our full powers to that State being for the general purpose only of concluding a treaty of Amity and Commerce, the redemption of our citizens made...
We received by the last Packet the favor of your letter of Jan ry. 14. in which we have the agreeable information of your having accepted the appointment of Secretary for foreign Affairs. Besides the general interest we feel in this event as members of the Union which is to availed of your services, we are particularly happy that a channel of communication is opened for us with Congress in...
The United States of America, heretofore connected in Government with Great Britain, have found it necessary for their Happiness to Seperate from her, and to assume an independant Station. consisting of a number of Seperate States, they have confederated together, and placed the Sovereignty of the whole, in matters relating to foreign nations, in an body an Assembly consisting of Delegates...
The United States of America in Congress Assembled on the 14th. day of Febry. last resolved, that the Ministers of the United States who are directed to form Treaties with the Emperor of Morocco and the Regencies of Algiers Tunis and Tripoli be empowered to apply any Money in Europe belonging to the United States to that use: As you are appointed to proceed to Morocco as Agent for forming such...
The United States of america in Congress assembled judging that an intercourse between the Subjects of his Britannic Majesty & the Citizens of the Said States founded on the Principles of equality, reciprocity & friendship may be of mutual advantage to both nations, on the 12 th. day of may last, issued their Commission under the Seal of the Said States to the Subscribers as their Ministers...
We had the honour of receiving your Letter of Jan ry: 24. covering a translation into French of the Draught of a treaty proposed between His Majesty the King of Prussia & the United States of America, together with answers to the several articles. We have considered them with attention, & with all those dispositions to accomodate them to the wishes of His Majesty which a respect for his...
In our letter of Nov r 11 th. we had the honour of laying before Congress a state of our proceedings till that date. As from that it would appear that the last communications had in every instance passed from us to the other parties we can now only add the answers of such of them as have yet answered, & our replies; these are the courts of Portugal, Tuscany & Great Britain. N o. 1. is a copy...
The Importance of Peace with the Algerines, and the other Inhabitants of the Coast of Barbary, to the United States, renders it necessary that every information which can be obtained should be laid before Congress: And as the demands for the Redemption of Captives as well as the amount of Customary Presents are so much more considerable than seem to have been expected in America it appears to...
The friendly dispositions which his Majesty has been pleased to shew to the United States of America on every occasion, as well as the assurances given them in the 8 th. Art. of the treaty of Amity & Commerce that he would employ his good offices & interposition with the powers on the coast of Barbary to provide for the safety of the Citizens of the United States their vessels and effects...
Having assembled together at this place about the latter end of August we proceeded in obedience to the commands of Congress to notify our appointment and its objects to such Powers as we thought it adviseable at that time to address. We wrote a circular letter in the form N o. 1. to the Ambassadors or other Ministers residing here from the courts of Saxony; the two Sicilies, Sardinia, Venice,...
Soon after our meeting together in London, We had a Conference with the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs in which we communicated to him, the joint Commission of Congress for negotiating a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain, and left an attested Copy of it in the Hands of his Lordship. at the same time His Lordship was informed that as the Commission was limited to two years duration,...
The United States of America in Congress Assembled judging that an intercourse between the Subjects of His Prussian Majesty and the Citizens of the said States founded on the principles of equality reciprocity and friendship, may be of mutual advantage to both nations, on the twelfth day of May last, issued their Commission under the Seal of the said States to the Subscribers as their...
We have received your two letters of the 15th and 18th July from Alicant, and are sorry to learn that your indisposition discourages you from travelling by land or by sea. We still think it most advisable both for your own interest and that of the United States, that you should return to Congress for their further instructions as soon as possible, and we again propose to you to embark from...
We have received the letter you did us the honour to write us on the 10 th day of December last. We supposed that the principles contained in the project of a Treaty, which we had the honour to transmit you, were a virtual answer to the requisition in the last lines of your letter of the eighteenth of October. By the second & third Articles, the citizens & subjects of each power may frequent...
Congress having been pleased to invest us with full powers for entering into treaty of Amity and Alliance with the Emperor of Morocco, and it being impracticable for us to attend his court in person and equally impracticable on account of our seperate stations to receive a Minister from him, we have concluded to effect our object by the intervention of a confidential person. We concur in...
We received the Letter your Excellency did us the honour of writing to us the 8 th Ult o. together with the copy of your full powers to treat with us. M r Adams had as you suppose, preserved a copy of the project of a Treaty that had been concerted between your Excellency & him; but having by instruction from the Congress our Sovereign certain new articles to propose in all our Treaties with...
We have received the Letter which your grace did us the honour of writing us on the 24 th. day of Last month, and we received with much Satisfaction the assurances on the part of his Britannic Majesty’s Ministers of their readiness to take into consideration any proposals coming from the United States of america that Can tend to the establishing a System of mutual & permanent advantage, to the...
1. Commerce. What are the articles of their export and import? What articles of American produce might find a market in Algiers and at what prices? Whether rice, flour, tobacco, furs, ready built ships, fish, oil, tar, turpintine, ship timber &c. and whether any of these articles would hereafter be acceptable as presents? What duties are levied by them on exports and imports? Do all nations...
We have the honour to enclose an extract of a letter from the Commissioners of the United States of America to Your Excellency dated Aug st. 28 th. 1778. Copy of Your Excellency’s ans r dated 27. Sept r. 1778. & Copy of M. de Sartine’s letter to Your Excellency of the 21 st of Sept r. 1778 all relative to a proposed negotiation with the States of Barbary. Not having any particular authority or...
We have received the Letter you did us the honour to write us on the 27 th day of Sept r last, and we thank you for your care in transmitting to your Court, the information of our appointment to treat with it. You desire to be informed if one or more of us can repair to Madrid for the purpose of conducting & concluding the negotiation, because that it is the system of your Court in matters...
According to your desire I wrote two letters to America to enquire after the fate of Mr. Gallatin. One was to Mr. Savary , from whom I have as yet received no answer. The second was to Mr. Jay Secretary for foreign affairs to the United States. He put the paragraph of my letter into the public papers, desiring those who knew any thing of Mr. Gallatin to communicate what they knew. He soon...
Entre les soussignés Haut et Puissant Seigneur Auguste-Louis-Joseph-Fidel-Amand De Lespinasse Langeac, Chevalier Comte de Langeac, Colonel d’Infanterie, Chevalier de l’Ordre royal et Militaire de St. Louis, Gouverneur pour le Roi des Villes de Guerande, Le Croisic et St. Nazaire en Bretagne, de celle de Ruë en Picardie, et en Survivance de celle du Puy en Vélay, et ancien Capitaine des Gardes...
Par devant Les Conseillers du Roy, Notaires au Chatelet de Paris, Soussignés Fut Present Haut et Puissant Seigneur Auguste Louis Joseph fidele Amand de Lespinasse Langeac, Chevalier Comte de Langeac, Colonel d’Infanterie, Chevalier de l’ordre Royal et militaire de St. Louis, le Gouverneur pour le Roy des villes de Guerande, Le Croisic et St. Nazaire En Bretagne, de Celle de Rüe en Picardie, et...
Additional questions of M. de Meusnier, and answers 1. What has led Congress to determine that the concurrence of seven votes is requisite in questions which by the Confederation are submitted to the decision of a Majority of the U.S. in Congress Assembled? The IXth. article of Confederation, §. 6. evidently establishes three orders of questions in Congress. 1. The greater ones, which relate...
Bail M. Guireaud Detalairac à M. Jefferson Par devant Les conseillers du Roy, notaires au chatelet de paris soussignés: fut présent M. françois Guireaud de Taleyrac, conseiller du roy, Juge rapporteur du point d’honneur, demeurant a paris rüe Du mail paroisse St. Eustache, Lequel a par ces présentes fait Bail et donné à loyer pour neuf années entieres et consécutives qui ont commencé dès le...
The Commonwealth of Virginia in gratitude for the services of the Major General the Marquis de la fayette, have determined to erect his bust in their capitol. Desirous to place a like monument of his worth and of their sense of it in the Country to which they are indebted for his birth, they have hoped that the City of Paris will consent to become the depository of this second testimony of...
We duly received your letter of the 20 th of June, and now in consequence thereof send you a draught of a treaty which we should be willing to have proposed to the court of London. We have taken for our groundwork the original draught proposed to Denmark, making such alterations & additions only as had occurred in the course of our negociations with Prussia & Tûscany and which we thought were...
Among the instructions given to the Ministers of the United States for treating with foreign powers, was one of the 11th. of May 1784. relative to an individual of the name of John Baptist Pecquet. It contains an acknowlegement on the part of Congress of his merits and sufferings by friendly services rendered to great numbers of American seamen carried prisoners into Lisbon, and refers to us...
We duly received your letter of the 20th. of June and now in consequence thereof send you a draught of a treaty which we should be willing to have proposed to the court of London. We have taken for our ground work the original draught proposed to Denmark, making such alterations and additions only as had occurred in the course of our negociations with Prussia and Tuscany and which we thought...
In my letter of the 3d inst. I mentioned to you the gazette account of a change in the British ministry. Just in the moment of the departure of the post we received a letter from the Marquis Fayette confirming the account of the change and rectifying that of the vote of the Prince of Wales. The letter which had come here supposed the king a friend to the E. India bill and that the Prince voted...
Among the instructions given to the Ministers of the United states for treating with foreign powers, was one of the 11 th. of May 1784. relative to an individual of the name of John Baptist Pecquet. it contains an acknowlegement on the part of Congress of his merits and sufferings by friendly services rendered to great numbers of American seamen carried prisoners into Lisbon, and refers to us...
An improvement in the manner of preparing musical instruments which are keyed and quilled. The present mode of quilling a harpsichord is subject to this great inconvenience that some of the quills will after a little use, crack and lose their elastic spring, whilst others retain their full vigour, thereby rendering the touch unequal and some tones full and loud whilst others are so faint and...
I took the liberty to recommend to your protection a lettre to our common Friend Benjamin Franklin, which was of great importance for me. As scarce one letter of three which Dr. Franklin or other of my american Friends have dispatched to me have come to hands, and as the same fatality befell those letters I wrote to him and to others, I should be extremily happy to be informed as soon as...
Your favor of July 2. came duly to hand. The concern you therein express as to the effect of your pamphlet in America, induces me to trouble you with some observations on that subject. From my acquaintance with that country I think I am able to judge with some degree of certainty of the manner in which it will have been received. Southward of the Chesapeak it will find but few readers...
By the inclosed paper I presume there are arrived for me on board the packet three small boxes of seeds or plants, and a large box, the contents of which I know not. I will beg the favor of you to pay for me the freight and other expences, and to send the three small boxes by the Diligence. As to the large one, I conjecture it may contain bones and other objects of Natural history which should...
I have received your letter wherein you mention that the arrears of interest due from the United states to M. de Fleury have been attached in your hands on my behalf. I beg leave to observe to you that it is only five hundred and seven livres, part thereof, which I paid on his order to M. de la Vallette, and which it is necessary for you to stop. All over that sum, you will be pleased to pay...
N’ayant point de vos nouvelles depuis mon retour á Paris, je prends la liberté de vous demander le progrés que vous avez fait dans les recherches dont vous avez bien voulu vous charger pour les livres que je vous ai prié de me procurer, et quand je pourrai en attendre l’expedition ou de la totalité, ou de telle partie que vous auriez pu trouver en attendant la reste. J’ai l’honneur d’etre...
[ Annapolis, 9 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “J. Key. Extract from my Cash book—additional instructions.” Not found.]