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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 361-390 of 2,292 sorted by date (descending)
An impatience to commence the paiment of my debt to you, induced me to convey to you, in the moment I received it, the joyful information from the managers of my affairs that by the end of the year 1786. they would be cleared of all other embarrasments, and I proposed to you at the same time arrangements for paiment. I have been not a little mortified by subsequent information from them that...
My last letters from Virginia inform me of your marriage with Mr. Hastings Marks. I sincerely wish you joy and happiness in the new state into which you have entered. Tho Mr. Marks was long my neighbor, eternal occupations in business prevented my having a particular acquaintance with him as it prevented me from knowing more of my other neighbors as I would have wished to have done. I saw...
My letters from Virginia informing me of your intermarriage with my sister, I take the earliest opportunity of presenting you my sincere congratulations on that occasion. Tho the occupations in which I was ever engaged prevented my forming with you that particular acquaintance which our neighborhood might have permitted, it did not prevent my entertaining a due sense of your merit. I am...
I am now writing to your aunt Eppes, and wish to inclose her something of your drawing. Bring with you tomorrow the best lesson you have done and the smallest. Or could you to-day and Monday begin, and finish something on purpose to be sent? Desire your sister to write to your aunt to-day, and to bring the letter tomorrow. Kiss her for me and kiss Kitty too. Be always good, practise your...
I have the honor of sending your Excellency the second volume of the American Philosophical transactions which came to my hands yesterday. My correspondent writes me that the first volume cannot be bought at this moment, the depot in which they were kept having been destroyed during the war. But he adds that they propose to reprint the first volume and that he will take care to send me a copy...
Your favor of Aug. 20. 1787. came to hand some time ago; that of Apr. 15. 1788 I received last night. I had just written to Mr. Eppes on the subject of my affairs, and intended writing to you to-day. The opportune arrival of the last letter enables me to answer both at the same time. I am much pleased that you approve of my plan of hiring my estate. Besides that the profit will be greater, it...
His excellency Count Dugnani archbishop of Rhodes and Nuncio of the Pope at this court supposes that there may be in the post office of Havre a packet addressed to him from America. I have promised him I would ask the favor of you to have the post office examined and to forward the packet if it be there; which I have the honour now to request of you. Since the date of my last no new...
It is rendering mutual service to men of virtue and understanding to make them acquainted with one another. I need no other apology for presenting to your notice the bearer hereof Mr. Barlow. I know you were among the first who read the Visions of Columbus, while yet in Manuscript: and think the sentiments I heard you express of that poem, will induce you to be pleased with the acquaintance of...
Your favor of Dec. 29. 1787. came to hand May 24. and that of April 4. on the 30th. of June. I will chearfully take the settlement with Jones off your hands, and do it as well as it can be done here. I wrote to him yesterday that I would proceed to settlement when he pleases. I should desire to take as our basis the last account current received by Mr. Wayles during his lifetime: because to...
I had the honour of observing to you in our first conference that I had no authority to purchase the books you offered for the United states; but still that there was a possibility they might be so interesting to them as to induce me to risk myself by making the purchase , tho out of my line of duty. On examination of them however I found them by no means sufficiently interesting to be...
In my letter of January 5. of the last year, I informed you that I had received information from the gentlemen to whose management I had left my estate, that the proceeds of a sale they had made, with the profits of the estate to the end of the year 1786. would clear it of other demands so that I might begin the discharge of a debt to Kippen & co. and my part of Mr. Wayles’s debt to you: that...
The letter of March 15. which Your Excellency did me the honour to write me arrived during my absence on a journey through Holland and Germany, and since my return my attention has been necessarily engaged by objects of business which had accumulated during my absence. The friendly reception of Mr. and Mrs. Paradise in Virginia, which you kindly ascribe in some measure to my letters, was in...
The letter of March 15. which you did me the honor to address me, came during my absence on a journey through Holland and Germany, and my first attentions after my return were necessarily called to some objects of business of too pressing a nature to be postponed. This has prevented my acknoleging, so soon as I could have wished, the honour of receiving your letter. The welcome reception which...
Your communications of the 26th. Ult. instead of needing apology from you, require thanks from me, which I most cordially give you. I shall make a due use of them here, and trust they will have some effect. You cannot do me a greater favor than by a continuance of your communications while you remain in London, of which I will endeavor to profit my country.—Mr. Barlow of Connecticut arrived...
A printer here has begun to print the most remarkeable of the English authors, as that can be done here much cheaper than in England or even Ireland. He supposes America could take off a considerable number of copies, and has therefore applied to me to find a sure correspondent for him. Being unacquainted with the printers of Philadelphia and the booksellers, yet satisfied that that would be...
We, Thomas Jefferson, Minister plenipotentiary for the United States of America at the court of Versailles certify to all whom it may concern: That we are personally and well acquainted with the family of Mrs. Lucy Paradise, wife of John Paradise esquire, with their connections and condition: That the said Lucy was born in the state of Virginia, in the lawful wedlock of her parents, of a...
Monsieur Foulloy having delivered to me two books of Silas Deane, to wit his letter book of 1777. and his Daybook of accounts from 1776 to 1780. which he has as a pledge from Silas Deane for the sum of a hundred and twenty guineas. I promise to return to him those books, or to be answerable to him for the sum for which he holds them as a pledge; the books to be redelivered on his demand...
The inclosed being part of a newspaper published here I thought you would like to see it, and therefore cut it out and inclose it. I have no doubt that the author of it has had you in view when he wrote it: and perhaps, when you return it may be worth while to see what he offers to shew. I have had conversations on your business since you left us, and find you will not be able to get a step...
The bearer hereof, Mr. l’Olive, having intended a voyage to Virginia the last year, I gave him a letter of introduction for Colo. Bannister your father. Having since understood that Colo. Bannister was gone to the West Indies, I now take the liberty of addressing Mr. L’Olive to your acquaintance. You will find him perfectly worthy of it in every respect, and your attentions will be more...
As a private individual and citizen of America I can with propriety and truth deliver it to you as my firm belief that the loan office certificate you shewed me, and all others of the same kind will be paid, principal and interest, as soon as the circumstances of the United states will permit: that I do not consider this as a distant epoch, nor suppose there is a publick debt on earth less...
Trévoux en Dombes, 2 July 1788 . Asks TJ’s advice and protection in moving with his family to the United States; inquires “ si, avec votre secours, je pourrois obtenir dans l’un des états unis d’amérique, une Concession de terrein de bonne qualité et en un lieu où l’air soit sain? Dans lesquels des états unis j’aurais à choisir pour me fixer? et quelles seraient les conditions de la Concession...
The bearer hereof, Monsieur L’Olive, proposing [to] pass thro’ Virginia, I take the liberty of presenting him to your Excellency’s acquaintance, and notice. He is a very wealthy and worthy citizen of this country, and will justify by his merit the attentions you will be so good as to shew him. He has the disadvantage of not speaking our language, and I do not know whether your Excellency may...
In mine of the 29th. June by the last post I inclosed you Mr. Grand’s letter of credit for £80. on Mr. Teissier. By your favor of the 25th. handed me to-day by Mr. Parker I see there is a probability that the carriage you had in view will not have been disposed of before the letter of credit reaches you, so that the opportunity of making the purchase will not be lost. I consulted with Mr....
I have duly received the letter of the 22d. instant with which you were pleased to honour me. I have written to the Count de Bernstorff, Minister for foreign affairs at the court of Denmark to propose his empowering some person here to arrange our demand against them. I presume they will authorise the Baron de Blome to do it. As soon as they shall have sent full powers to him or any other...
I have now the honour to return you the paper you were so kind as to inclose me on the subject of whale oil. Immediately on the receipt of it, I asked the opinion of the Redacte[ur] of the Arrêt of Dec. 29. whether the duty should be paid on the gross or nett weight. His answer was that it had [been] his intention, in wording the Arret, to have the duties [paid] on the weight of the oil only,...
J’ai reçu en bon ordre les livres que vous avez eu la bonté de m’expedier, et aussi la lettre du 5. Courant que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’ecrire avec la catalogue. Je ne trouve sur cette catalogue que deux articles que je vous demand[erai] c’est à dire Demetrius Phalereus de elocutione. Gr.lat. Foulis. 1743. 3. Menandri et Philemonis reliquiae. Gr.lat. Amstel. 1709. 7 –10. Ayez la bonté...
A delay of the post office put it out of my power to answer your’s of the 20th. by the first post. I now inclose you a letter of credit on Mr. Teissier for eighty pounds sterling. This will cover the cost of the Tea vase after paying for the carriage if it be not sold before your receipt of this. If it be, you may hereafter at your leisure perhaps find another. You judged rightly in supposing...
According to your desire in a former letter, I wrote to Mr. Oster Consul of France in Virginia, on the subject of your ship le David. I now inclose you his answer received last night. He does not explain why the government of Virginia refused to suffer the Captain and crew to be sent back: but I presume it is on the general principle that our laws do not give up criminals to any nation to be...
I think I recollect to have written, about a year ago, to Virginia for a small package of tobacco of a particular quality made on my own estate. It was intended for a friend in France who makes his own snuff and was curious to try tobacco of the first quality. This may be the package which you are so kind as to mention in your letter of the 25th. instant. I am in hopes there are in the same...
I have the honor now to inclose you the letter for his Excellency the count de Bernstorff which you were so kind as to undertake to forward. I sincerely wish the effect of it may be that you may be charged with the settlement of the affair which is the subject of it. It would assure to us a candid and speedy arrangement. Permit me to add to these wishes the assurances of respect & attachment...