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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I informed you in my last that I would write you again on the subject of Admiral Paul Jones’s affairs. He had provided another fund for fulfilling his objects, and only desired me to call on you by way of supplement. I have therefore waited till I could know the extent of that fund; and I now find it is more than sufficient to answer the purposes with which I am charged: so that there will be...
Very much to do must always be my apology for acknoleging so late the receipt of your letters, and it will always be a true one in my present situation. I have been the less uneasy about this as I have from time to time mentioned to Doctor Bancroft what was necessary in the way of business. We wait with anxiety to hear whether the refusing creditor has yet come in. Tho’ Mr. Paradise does not...
I wrote you last on the 16th. inst. and since that have received yours of the 2d. inst. from Rome. By this I find you would leave Rome the 4th. and I am much afraid you will have left Florence before a letter will get there which I wrote Feb. 28. inclosing my commission for Genoa. I think I sent this letter to Florence under cover to your bankers: yet I am not sure that I did not send it to...
I have been lately honoured with your letter of Sep. 24. 1788. accompanied by a diploma for a doctorate of laws which the University of Harvard has been pleased to confer on me. Conscious how little I merit it, I am the more sensible of their goodness and indulgence to a stranger who has had no means of serving or making himself known to them. I beg you to return them my grateful thanks, and...
Your favor of Jan. 20/31 from Petersburg came safe to hand, and is the only proof we have received of your existence since you left Copenhagen. I mention this that, reflecting how and what you have written heretofore, you may know how and what you may write hereafter. I shall put nothing into this letter but what is important to you, and unimportant to any government thro which it may pass. To...
I have the honor to acknolege your favor without date as also that [enclosed from Mr. Alexander Cain of] Bordeaux [who has desired] me to apply to the government so the bounty [….] which bounty [….] because [….] has mislaid or lost his clearance, and can only supply it by his own oath and that of others of his crew. I cannot ask of the government in any one case what I would not ask in every...
I have had the honor of notifying to you before that the manuscript which I put into your hands contained notes which I had made, in the course of my reading for my own use as the member of a legislature in America. As such it was necessary for me to know not only the law of the moment but what it had been at other times. The qualifications of a knight of a shire have been different at...
Mr. Jefferson has the honor to present his compliments to Mr. Swan and to express his regret that his absence today prevented him the pleasure of seeing him. He now returns him his letters in which he finds a great deal of good matter, and many useful views. In the course of perusing them, Mr. Jefferson noted on a bit of paper the following doubts, the importance and justice of which are...
I have had the honor heretofore of apprising you of the measures taken for paiment of the arrearages of interest due to the foreign officers, and that it rested on two points. 1. The success of a loan opened in Holland. 2. Orders from America to apply to that object so much of the money to be borrowed when so much shall be in hand. The last object is fulfilled by the resolution of Congress...
I received in due time your favor of Dec. 9. and also the six copies of your history. I put off acknoleging the receipt in hopes I might find time previously to read them. But that time is not yet come, and I am unwilling longer to delay my thanks for your attention in sending them. I have had occasion to consult your history in various parts, and have always done it with satisfaction. In...
Your favor of Nov. 29. 1788. came to hand the last month. How it happened that mine of Aug. 1787. was fourteen months on it’s way is inconceivable. I do not recollect by what conveyance I sent it. I had concluded however either that it had miscarried or that you had become indolent as most of our countrymen are in matters of correspondence. The change in this country, since you left it, is...
My last letter to you extended from Dec. 23. to Jan. 11. A confidential opportunity now arising I can acknolege the receipt of yours of Jan. 15. at the date of which you could not have received mine. You know long ago that the meeting of the States is to be at Versailles on the 27th. of April. This country is entirely occupied in it’s elections which go on quietly and well. The Duke d’Orleans...
That you may see whether any of my letters to you or of yours to me have miscarried, I will here state them. Mine have been Sep. 20. 24. Nov. 21. Dec. 8. Jan. 22. Feb. 9. 28. Yours which have been received are Sep. 24. Oct. 2. 3. 11. 18. 28. Nov. 19. 29. Dec. 23. 31. Jan. 14. Feb. 11. 17. 25. We have no news from America since my last. This country is entirely occupied in electioneering, which...
I wrote you by yesterday’s post. The present is merely to avail myself of a private conveiance which occurs to London to send you my American dispatches and pray you to forward them by the first safe conveiance to New York preferably to any other port. Vessels going to Philadelphia have to go up the river, a navigation of many days. Those going to Boston expose us to as long an intermediate...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received your’s of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. & 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
Your favor of the 10th. is just now received, and as the refusal of one of Mr. Paradise’s creditors to accede to the deed of trust, will occasion some change in Mr. Paradise’s plan this again will require that the whole be dispatched. As the post goes out in the morning, and his lodgings are very distant from me I cannot consult him expressly on the occasion, but many conversations have put me...
Since closing my letters which accompany this I have received an answer from London on the subject of the other volumes of Deane’s letters and accounts suggested to be still in his possession. This information renders it certain that none such are in his possession, and probable that no others exist but the two which I have purchased. I am in hopes therefore we may conclude that the recovery...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received yours of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. and 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
Your favor of the 10th. is come to hand to-day. I inclose you a bill of exchange of £25. from Grand & co. on Thelusson fils & co. in order to face my affairs with which I give you so much trouble. I expect Lackington will call on you as soon as you receive this for a sum of about £5. Be so good as to tell him to add to my catalogue No. 5894. Baretti 3/. (He will understand this.) Besides this...
I had the honour of writing to you on the 15th. of February, soon after which I had that of receiving your favor of Dec. 29. I have a thousand questions to ask you about your journey to the Indian treaty, how you like their persons, their manners, their costume, cuisine &c. But this I must refer till I can do it personally in New York, where I hope to see you for a moment in the summer, and to...
No opportunity having occurred to send my letter of Feb. 27. I have had time to receive an answer from our bankers, and to write them again. In their answer they quote some resolution of Congress appropriating the monies borrowed in 1787. and 1788. to the paiment of interest to the end of the year 1790. on the Dutch loans, and the residue to salaries and contingent expences arising in Europe....
My friend Mr. Short, who is returning from Italy, expects to pass by Toulon, and wishes permission to see the docks and arsenals of that place. It is understood that this is not permitted without a special order. I therefore take the liberty of asking from you a letter to any person at Toulon who can procure this gratification for Mr. Short and also for Mr. Rutledge who is with him. They have...
Since my last, which was of Dec. 21. yours of Dec. 9. and 21. are received. Accept my thanks for the papers and pamphlets which accompanied them, and mine and my daughter’s for the book of songs. I will not tell you how much they have pleased us nor how well the last of them merits praise for it’s pathos, but relate a fact only, which is that while my elder daughter was playing it on the...
I have now to acknolege the honor of your several letters of Aug. 12. Oct. 17. and Nov. 27. and your postscript to Madame de Brehan’s of Dec. 29. I have been discouraged from writing to you by the idea that your friends here must give you infinitely more exact information of what is passing, than I could do, who see things imperfectly only, as a stranger. But your complaints of the...
I had the honour of addressing you on the 1st. instant through the post. I write the present, incertain whether Mr. Nesbitt, the bearer of your last, will be the bearer of this, or whether it may not have to wait some other private occasion. They have reestablished their packet-boats here indeed; but they are to go from Bordeaux, which being between four and five hundred miles from hence, is...
I received last night your catalogue, and the post being to set out this morning I send you, on the next leaf , a list of those I wish to take. The warning being too short to procure a bill of exchange and send it by this post, it shall follow by the next which leaves this place four days hence. In the mean time be so good as to pack the books in a light box, and after four days from your...
La lettre que vous avez bien voulu m’envoyer pour Monsieur Laurence lui a eté expedié de ma part dans le tems, et j’aurai l’honneur de lui faire tenir encore toutes celles que vous aurez occasion de lui addresser. Il y a un jeune Americain, Monsieur Rutledge, qui est de la Caroline meridionale, et qui doit passer par Avignon et Nismes dans le courant des mois de Mars et Avril. Il fera un...
Your zeal to promote the general good of mankind by an interchange of useful things, and particularly in the line of agriculture, and the weight which your rank and station would give to your interposition, induce me to ask it for the purpose of obtaining one of the species of rice which grows in Cochin-china on high lands, and which needs no other watering than the ordinary rains. The sun and...
I did not expect you so soon to-day, or I should have come in in time to have the pleasure of seeing you. The safe-conduct which I asked and obtained of Monsieur de Villedeuil was for you as a Courier, bringing dispatches to me from our Secretary for foreign affairs. The answers to these dispatches being now ready I cannot ask a continuance of that safe conduct. But so far as my consent to...
J’ai reçu bien conditionnés les quatre paniers de vin de Meursault que vous avez eu la bonté de m’expedier, et je serai pret d’en payer le montant à votre ordre quand vous voulez bien la faire presenter. Je vous prie meme de le faire auplutot parce que je conte de partir le mois prochain pour l’Amerique, d’où je ne serai de retour que l’automne. À cet epoque là j’aurai besoin de m’adresser à...