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I cannot easily tell you how much I am pleased & obliged by your friendly Letter of the 4th. Instant:—were I to pursue my Inclinations, I should without Hesitation accept your kind Invitation—but our Inclinations even in things innocent must not always be gratified. my Visits to Philadelphia have ceased to be occasional, or I should certainly avail myself of those opportunities which your...
I was favored with yours of the 28 th . Ult. just as I was preparing to go out of Town— it was not untill last Evening that I returned, or I should have taken an earlier opportunity of answering your Letter— Accept my Thanks for your friendly Congratulations. I am convinced of ^believe^ them Sincere ity and value them accordingly— It would give me great Pleasure to have opportunities of...
I hope I may by this Time congratulate You on your safe Arrival, and happy meeting with your Son at amsterdam. M r. Laurens is here, & in better Health than I have heretofore seen him since he left America— His Stay will probably be short, for his Permission to return creates Doubts in his Mind as to the Propriety of his continuing to act with us, unless by our particular Request; and M r...
I wrote to you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th: of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress.— The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation...
I am sorry it is not yet in my Power to tell you any thing decisive and satisfactory respecting the Question between you & the collector. The want of a sufficient number of States in congress has prevented my asking & recieving their orders on the Subject. Your attention to the Rights of Office is certainly proper; and I assure you of my Disposition to secure to you the perfect & uninterupted...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as...
One of these Days I shall devote a Leisure Hour to forming a Cypher, and will send it to You by the first good Conveyance that may afterwards offer. at present I am engaged on many Committees, so that my attendance on them and on Congress, keeps me fully employed. I observe with Pleasure that in this Congress there appears to be good Talents & good Dispositions. none of their more important...
In whatever Point of Light our two Countries may in future view each other, or whatever System of Politics may prevail in either, I always ^ shall ^ continue to consider you as one to whom who merits my Esteem as a public Man, and my acknowledgments as a Friend. I regret my leaving England without having seen ^ had an opportunity of bidding ^ you farewell, and the more ^ so ^ as it is not
We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10 th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as wanted in particular Paragraphs. The...
I have been fav[ore] d . with your’s of the 15 Inst: by Mr Parkman, and am much pleased with him and his fellow Traveller Mr. Coolidge. Their Representation of the State of Things in Massachusetts, corresponds with the Hints on that Head suggested in your Letter. There is too much Intelligence in the northern States to admit of their being greatly and long decieved and misled; and I hope the...
on calling this Moment for my Man Manuel to comb me I am told he is gone to shew my Nephew the Fair— I fear they will have so many fine Things & Raree shows to see and admire, that my Head will remain in statu quo ’till afternoon, & consequently our intended Visit to C t. Sarsfield be postponed. Thus does Tyrant Custom sometimes hold us by a Hair , and thus do ridiculous Fashions make us...
From the Day of my appointment to this mission, my Attention has been much withdrawn from my friends, and confined to the Business which brought me here; & which has at last been terminated by a Treaty. In future I shall have more Leisure to attend to my Friends, and to my own affairs— Both your sons arrived here in good Health. I wrote to my friend John lately, but as yet have not had a...
On the 4 June last I had the Pleasure of writing you a Letter acknowleging the Reciept of yours of the 15 May —since which none of your Favors have reached me. I have just been reading the Capitulation of Charles Town. I suspect they wanted Provisions. The Reputation of the Garrison will suffer till the Reasons of their Conduct are explained. I wish a good one may be in their Power. They are...
I had the Pleasure of recg your favor of the 28 ult. a few Days ago. I congratulate You sincerely on the accession of Friesland and the flattering Prospect there is that the Example of that Province will be followed by that of Holland and the others. It would give me great Satisfaction to be able to transmit you In­ telligence equally agreable, but that is not the Case. Prudence forbids me to...
In Obedience to the Orders of Congress I have the Honor of informing you, that Phineas Bond Esq r. has presented to Congress a Commission from his britannic Majesty, constituting him Commissary for all commercial Affairs within the United States, and another Commission constituting him Consul for the States of New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania, Delaware and Maryland.— Congress being desirous...
Docr. Edwards of Philada. will be so obliging as to take charge of this Letter. I regret that he & Mrs. Edwards leave this peace so soon—. You will find him a Gentleman of extensive Information.—He has visited the greater part of this Kingdom, and paid particular attention to the Husbandry of it.—Permit me to introduce him to You. I have heard, and wish it may be true, that your Son is...
I am this Moment informed of a safe opportunity of conveying you a Letter, and as such another may not soon offer, I must not omit it. My opinion coincides with yours as to the Impropriety of treating with our Enemies on any other than an equal footing. We have told M r Oswald so, & he has sent an Express to London to communicate it, and to require further Instructions. He has not yet rec d ....
In Compliance with the Request of Sir John Sinclair I have the Pleasure of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Book which I recd. from him two Days ago. As it is now probable that Col. Smith will meet with a greater number of opportunities of sending it than will occur to me, I shall take the Liberty of committing it to his care— Be pleased to present Mrs. Jay & my best Compts. to Mrs....
You will recieve this at a Moment, when you will again find yourself surrounded by your amiable Family— it is a pleasing Circumstance, and I congratulate you on the occasion. We are much obliged to M rs . Adams for having honored us tho for a little while with her Company— it has confirmed the Esteem which her Character had inspired.— If wishes were not vain, I should wish you all well settled...
Your Letter of the 1 st . Instant was last Week left at my House—presuming from that Circumstance that your Son was in town, I sent my Son to enquire for him at our principal Lodging Houses, and at other Places—but without Success. I regret ^my^ not having had the Pleasure of seeing him, and evincing by friendly attentions my Esteem and Regard both for You and for him— It is happy for the...
The Letter w h . you did me the Honor to write on the first Day of this month, came to Hand as I was ab t . making an Excursion into the Country or it sh d . have been answ d . immediately. I return d . this afternoon— accept my thanks for these interesting Communications — I have read with pleasure the printed paper that was enclosed, and agreable to y r . Request, sh d . without Delay...
Your Favor of the 13 th . April last reached me a few Days ago. It gives me Pleasure to find that you are informed of the Friendship which formerly subsisted between our Families, and you rightly suppose that I will be influenced by it. The American Ministers in Europe are not authorized either severally or jointly, to appoint a Consul; and consequently I cannot have the Satisfaction of...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. our Friend Gerry...
Having read in the Papers of to Day, an Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in France to one at Boston, mentioning an Edict excluding foreign whale oil, I waited on the minister of France to be informed whether he had rec d . official Information of it. He told me he had not.— we had much Conversation on the Subject, and from it I was led to conclude, that he did not think it improbable that...
M r. Fitzherbert has just been with me. He will give passports for american merchantmen, on our doing the like for british ones. He informed me that Doct r. Franklin is preparing a number of these Passports, in his own name. As this Business appears to both of us to appertain rather to the american Commissioners for peace, than to the residentiary minister at this or any other Court; would it...
Your Fav r . of the 20 th . Inst. arrived last Evening— It is not in pursuance of a recent or hasty Resolution, that I am preparing to return: It has been long taken & maturely considered. The public accounts still detain me, for tho’ always kept by M r Carmichael, I do not chuse to leave them unsettled behind me— When that Obstacle ceases, which I expect will be very soon, I shall leave...
M r . Fitzherbert has just been with me— He will give passports for american merchantmen, on our doing the like for british ones. He informed me that Doct r . Franklin is preparing a number of these Passports, in his own name. As this Business appears to both ^ of ^ us to appertain rather to the american Commissioners for peace, than to the residentiary Minister at this or any other Court;...
Still I am unable to give you satisfactory Information on the old and interesting Subject of your Return. My Report on it is not yet decided upon by Congress, altho’ some Progress has been made in it.— My Endeavors to forward it shall continue unremitted.— My last Letter to you was on the 4 th. Day of September, since which I have not had the Honor of receiving any Letter from you. Your Letter...
In my Negociations with M r . Gardoqui I experience certain difficulties which in my Opinion should be so managed, as that even the Existence of them should remain a Secret for the present. I take the Liberty therefore of submitting to the Consideration of Congress whether it might not be adviseable to appoint a Committee with power to instruct and direct me on every point and Subject relative...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
On the 4 June last I had the Pleasure of writing you a Letter acknowledging the Reciept of yours of the 15 May—since which none of your Favors have reached me. I have just been reading the Capitulation of Charles Town. I suspect they wanted Provisions. The Reputation of the Garrison will suffer till the Reasons of their Conduct are explained. I wish a good one may be in their Power. They are...
On the 20th. Inst’ I recieved, and for the first Time saw, the fifth volume of Franklin’s works, published at Philadelphia. I was surprized to find in the 293d. page, a note of the Editor (Mr. William Temple Franklin) which contains a Paragraph in the following words—vizt.— “Mr. Adams and Mr. Jay had previously arrived, and in Time to share in the arduous and momentuous duties of the Mission....
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
a weeks absence on a visit to my friends at Rye, from whence I returned last Evening, prevented my having ’till then, the Pleasure of recieving your very obliging Letter of the 20 Dec r. — For the Invitation with which you honor me, be pleased to accept my cordial acknowledgements— It is conveyed in Terms which enhance the compliment, & I accept it with that Satisfaction which Politeness...
I was this Morn g favored with your obliging Letter of the 29 of Jany, together with the Cotton ^& seed^ mentioned in it, and for which accept my thanks This nankeen Cotton appears to me to be a valuable acquisition and I hope care will be taken to [ illegible ] ^keep^ it pure and unmixed— there are many plants of the same Genus but of different Species, which ^as I observed to you when here,^...
In my Letter to you of the 20th. Inst: I inserted a Copy of the one which on the 13th. Inst: I had written to Mr. William Duane; and promised on recieving his answer, to transmit a Copy of it to you. The last mail brought me his answer, in the words following— “Philadelphia—16th. March 1821”— “Sir Your Letter of the 13th. Inst: which you did me the honor to address to me, concerning some notes...
I have been fav d . with yours of the 11 th . Instant, in which you mention having rec d . from your Brother for me a Portrait of the late President, engraved from a painting of Stewart; and that You had sent it to the Care of M r . Constable— I have since rec d . it and am much obliged by this mark of your Brothers attention, as well as by your Care respecting it. When next you write to your...
The enclosed Extracts from the Journal of Congress will inform you of your Appointment to go as Minister to the Court of London, and of M r. Smith’s being elected Secretary to the Legation. I congratulate you on this Event. It argues the Confidence reposed in you by the United States, and I am persuaded will redound to their Advantage as well as to your Reputation.— The necessary Papers are...
Your Election to a Seat in Congress is an Event for many Reasons pleasing to me. I have for some time past flattered myself with soon having the Pleasure of again seeing you in a Place which you formerly filled with advantage to your Country and Reputation to yourself. Permit me to hint that your State is unrepresented, & that were you apprized of the very important Affairs now under...
I have considered the Hint suggested in your Letter of the     my long, and I may say habitual respect for the Sentiments of D r . Franklin, at first inclined me to adopt them relative to the Subject in Question. Further Consideration induced me to suspect that he has estimated the Influence of my opinions beyond their Value— If the Reasoning in the Pamphlet you allude to is just, it will have...
I have been honored with your Letter of the 19th. ult: informing me that I had been nominated to fill the office of Chief Justice of the united States; and Yesterday I recd. the Commission—this nomination so strongly manifests your Esteem, that it affords me particular Satisfaction— Such was the Temper of the Times, that the Act to establish the judicial courts of the U.S., was in some...
I wrote you a few Lines last Week— This Morning I was favored with two Letters from your Son of the 14 & 20 th . of this Month— Parents are gratified by hearing of or from their children— The former Letter was Dated at the Hague— the latter at Amsterdam— He had been rec d . and acknowledged by the States General, and on the 14 th had “a gracious audience of the Stadtholder”.— In his last...
I have the Honor of transmitting to You, herewith enclosed, an address from the Senate and assembly of this State which passed and was agreed to by both Houses unanimously— It gives me pleasure to reflect that from this and the numerous other Expressions of the public Sentiment, relative to the reprehensible conduct of France towards this Country, you may rely on the decided co-operation of...
The Rev d. Doctor Provost is so obliging as to take Charge of this Letter together with other Dispatches which he will deliver to you.— This Gentleman being elected by the Convention of episcopal Congregations in this State, and having the most express Recommendations from that Body, as well as from a general Convention lately held at Wilmington, is going over to be consecrated a Bishop.—...
I was this morning favored with your obliging Letter of the 31 ult.—D’Ivernois is very industrious.—I hear no more of his plan of transplanting the University of Geneva into the united States. He is a sensible diligent man, and I suspect that his Correspondence with Mr Gallatin has done no Harm— It gives me pleasure to find that in your opinion no great mischief will be done by the combustable...
As I see you every Day, it may seem singular that I sh d communicate to you by Letter any thing w h I might with more Ease be mentioned to you in Conversation. In times when it is so common for Men and Measures to be misrepresented, more than ordinary Caution is adviseable; and that Consideration induces me to commit to paper, what I sh d otherwise say to you personally in conversation on the...
The Packet not sailing until to morrow has put in my Power to get your Commission, Instructions and Letter of Credence completed. I also send You in another Parcel, of which M r. Randall is also to take Charge, the Journals printed since those with which I understand you have already been furnished.— With great Esteem & Regard / I am Dear Sir / Your most ob t. & hble. Serv t: RC and enclosure...
Still pressed by public Business occasioned by the late Session, I take up my pen to write you a few Lines before the Mail closes. It very unexpectedly happened that the antifederal party succeeded at the last Election in the City of New York, and acquired a decided Majority in the assembly. Well knowing their Veiws and Temper it was not adviseable that the Speech should contain any Matter...
AL : Historical Society of Delaware Mr Adams and Mr Jay present their Compliments to Dr Franklin and inform him, that they have just seen Mr Laurens and agreed with him upon a Meeting of the American Ministers Tomorrow at Eleven, at Mr Laurens’s Lodgings. The Drs Company is desired, and Mr Franklin Junr is requested also to attend. Addressed: Son Excellence / Monsieur Franklin / Ministre...
accept my thanks for your Letter mentioning the Marriage of your Daughter, and my cordial Congratulations on that pleasing Event.— they who best know the Col l: speake of him as brave and honorable; and Strangers to the Lady draw the most favorable Inferences from her Parentage, and from the attention and Example of a Mother whose charater is very estimable. I sincerely wish my dear Friend...