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At the Request of General Washington I commit to your Care the enclosed Letter for M rs. M c. Cauly Graham which I have received from him—the Vessel that carries this is preparing to sail—You shall hear from me again by Cap t. Coupar— I am D r Sir / Your Friend & Serv t.
I cannot omit this Opportunity of transmitting to You a Copy of an Act of Congress respecting M r. Temple. It appears to me to be a proper one—In my Opinion our public Conduct should be just and liberal on the one Hand, but firm and decided on the other.— I have the Honor to be with very sincere Esteem and Regard / Dear Sir / Your most ob t. Serv t.
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter of the 21 st. December from M r: Temple to me, which I laid before Congress. They have been pleased to direct that you communicate it to His Britannic Majesty—That you inform him, that the Complaint stated in it, being in general Terms, and unsupported by any particular Facts, or Evidence, they do not think it...
I wrote to you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th: of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress.— The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation...
I am sorry it is not yet in my Power to tell you any thing decisive and satisfactory respecting the Question between you & the collector. The want of a sufficient number of States in congress has prevented my asking & recieving their orders on the Subject. Your attention to the Rights of Office is certainly proper; and I assure you of my Disposition to secure to you the perfect & uninterupted...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as...
Congress at length begins to do Business—seven States are represented, and Genl. St. Clair was three Days ago chosen President.— Since my last to you of 17th Ult. I have not had the Pleasure of receiving any Letters from you.— You will herewith receive a letter from Congress to the Queen of Portugal, which you will be pleased to transmit in the Manner suggested in my Report, of which you will...
As you are already informed of Col. Nortons Demand on the British Governor! it will only be necessary for me to observe, that it does not appear to me to be of such a nature, as that it would be proper for Congress to interpose and instruct you on the Subject; and I have Reason to think that it strikes them in the same point of view— As the Col. is an American Citizen, I feel disposed to be as...
One of these Days I shall devote a Leisure Hour to forming a Cypher, and will send it to You by the first good Conveyance that may afterwards offer. at present I am engaged on many Committees, so that my attendance on them and on Congress, keeps me fully employed. I observe with Pleasure that in this Congress there appears to be good Talents & good Dispositions. none of their more important...
In whatever Point of Light our two Countries may in future view each other, or whatever System of Politics may prevail in either, I always ^ shall ^ continue to consider you as one to whom who merits my Esteem as a public Man, and my acknowledgments as a Friend. I regret my leaving England without having seen ^ had an opportunity of bidding ^ you farewell, and the more ^ so ^ as it is not
We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10 th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as wanted in particular Paragraphs. The...
Since my last to you of 25th. February I have not been favored with any Letters from you.— Congress have made some Progress in my Report on your Letter of 4th. March 1786 and the Papers that accompanied it—They lately passed the Resolutions of which you will find a Copy herewith enclosed. Having been ever since and still being too much indisposed to prepare Instructions for you on these...
private I lately wrote you a few hasty Lines just to as the vessel which carried them was departing; and inclosed and a Pamphlet containing my Correspondence with a M r Littlepage, who was formerly in my Family. The attack which produced that Pamphlet, was not only countenanced but stimulated by some of the Subjects of our good allies here. It is no Secret either to You or me that I am no...
In obedience to the orders of Congress I have the Honor of informing you, that Phineas Bond Esqr. has presented to Congress a Commission from his britannic Majesty, constituting him commissary for all commercial Affairs within the United States, and another Commission constituting him Consul for the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.— Congress being desirous...
on my Return two days ago from Jersey, I had the Pleasure of recieving your favor of the 11 Ult.— A sufficient number of Delegates to form a Congress not being at present in Town, it is not in my power to communicate it to that Honorable Body— nor indeed does it appear to me very probable that a sufficient number will be convened during the winter, unless some circumstance of Importance should...
You will recieve this at a Moment, when you will again find yourself surrounded by your amiable Family— it is a pleasing Circumstance, and I congratulate you on the occasion. We are much obliged to M rs . Adams for having honored us tho for a little while with her Company— it has confirmed the Esteem which her Character had inspired.— If wishes were not vain, I should wish you all well settled...
Although I have nothing important to say or transmit, yet I cannot let the Packet sail without a few lines for you.— I wrote to you the 31st. of July by Major Sears, and have since received yours of the 16th. June with the Contract mentioned in it—They are on the Table of Congress, but the want of an adequate Representation of the States has prevented any Thing being yet done on that or indeed...
You will receive herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter to me from the Honorable D. Huger Esqr. a Member of Congress, dated the 2d. April last, together with the Papers that were delivered to me by the Mr. Masters mentioned in it. As that gentleman is seeking Redress in the Course of judicial Proceedings, the Object of his Application to me doubtless is that I may so far recommend his Case to...
I had the Honor of writing to you on the 16th Day of last Month, and now have that of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Duplicate of the Ratification of your late Contract, together with a Copy of two Acts of Congress, Viz., one of the 18th. Day of July authorizing Mr. Jefferson to redeem our Captives at Algiers, and the other of the 12th. Day of October appropriating the Residue of the...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. our Friend Gerry...
Having read in the Papers of to Day, an Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in France to one at Boston, mentioning an Edict excluding foreign whale oil, I waited on the minister of France to be informed whether he had rec d . official Information of it. He told me he had not.— we had much Conversation on the Subject, and from it I was led to conclude, that he did not think it improbable that...
Still I am unable to give you satisfactory Information on the old and interesting Subject of your Return. My Report on it is not yet decided upon by Congress, altho’ some Progress has been made in it.—My Endeavours to forward it shall continue unremitted.— My last Letter to you was on the 4th. Day of September, since which I have not had the Honor of receiving any Letter from you. Your Letter...
Your Fav r . of the 20 th . Inst. arrived last Evening— It is not in pursuance of a recent or hasty Resolution, that I am preparing to return: It has been long taken & maturely considered. The public accounts still detain me, for tho’ always kept by M r Carmichael, I do not chuse to leave them unsettled behind me— When that Obstacle ceases, which I expect will be very soon, I shall leave...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. Our Friend Gerry...
In my Negociations with M r . Gardoqui I experience certain difficulties which in my Opinion should be so managed, as that even the Existence of them should remain a Secret for the present. I take the Liberty therefore of submitting to the Consideration of Congress whether it might not be adviseable to appoint a Committee with power to instruct and direct me on every point and Subject relative...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
I have been honored with your Letters of the 10th. 19. & 30 April and 1st. May last. Since the sitting of the Convention a sufficient number States for the Dispatch of Business have not been represented in Congress, so that it has neither been in my Power officially to communicate your Letters to them, nor to write on several Subjects on which it is proper that Congress should make known their...
I wrote you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th. of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress. The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation had...
The enclosed Extracts from the Journal of Congress will inform you of your Appointment to go as Minister to the Court of London, and of M r. Smith’s being elected Secretary to the Legation. I congratulate you on this Event. It argues the Confidence reposed in you by the United States, and I am persuaded will redound to their Advantage as well as to your Reputation.— The necessary Papers are...