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M r Hartley presents his Comp ts to M r Adams and if it be convenient to him, w d be glad to have the honour of waiting upon him and the gentlemen who are the other Commissioners and Ministers from the united States of America at 11 O’clock on Sunday morning, at M r Adams’s hotel, or any where else if more convenient. M r Hartley has had the pleasure of seeing D r Franklin who lives at the...
I told you last night that I felt myself unwell with the Commencement of a complaint on my breast. I am this morning obliged to be bled. I s hd be very much obliged to you if you w d be so good as to prevail upon your Collegues to favour me with a visit this morning as I really cannot come out myself. The sooner the better, because I hope with bleeding & one day’s nursing that I may get off...
I take the opportunity by means of Mr Laurens junr of addressing a few lines to you for the purpose of expressing my entire concurrence with your benevolent Sentiments concerning peace and the blessed peace makers . I agree with you that peace must come in company with faith and honour and when these meet, I join with you in saying, Let friendship join the amiable and venerable choir . It is...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (two), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (two); transcript: National Archives When the American peace commissioners saw David Hartley at Versailles on Tuesday, June 17, they told him that Congress had issued an order on April 24 opening American ports to British vessels—or so they understood from credible private...
ALS : William L. Clements Library; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives As the day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive treaties between Great Britain France and Spain I beg leave to inform you that I am ready to sign the Definitive treaty between Great Britain and the united States of America...
[ Paris ], June 1783. LbC-Tr ’s in Jean L’Air de Lamotte’s hand ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. The two proposals calendared here, one by David Hartley and the other by John Jay, are dated June in the Letterbook, but any effort to arrive at an exact date is problematical. They were likely done sometime after 21 May but prior to Hartley’s letter to the commissioners of 14 June , above, and...
Copies: Library of Congress (two), William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives It is agreed, that the Citizens of the United States of America shall be permitted to import into and to export from any Port or Place of the Territories belonging to the Crown of Great Britain in American Ships, any Goods, Wares &...
I take the liberty to introduce to your acquaintance my friend and relation Mr. Saml. Hartley. Some business carries him to Paris and he is desirous of that opportunity of being made known to you. Give me leave at the same time to tell you on my own account that I wish not to lose any occasion of expressing my personal respects to you. I heartily wish likewise that any fortunate events might...
Enclosed I send you a copy of a conciliatory bill which I moved in Parliament on the 27th of the last month. You will perceive by the tenor of it that it is drawn up in very general terms, containing a general power to treat, with something like a sketch of a line of negotiation. As the bill was not accepted by the Ministers in this Country, I have nothing further to say relating to it. As to...
Paris, 21 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:131–134 . LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. This memorial was Hartley’s response to the article that the commissioners had proposed on 29 April to open American and British ports to virtually unrestricted free trade, to which Hartley had at least tentatively agreed ( calendared, above
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
(I) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives; (II) Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society (four), Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, National Archives (four); press copy of copy: National Archives Formal...
Copies: Library of Congress, William L. Clements Library, Massachusetts Historical Society; two incomplete copies and incomplete transcript: National Archives The American peace commissioners grew increasingly suspicious as they waited for Fox to respond to the article that Hartley had presented to them without prior approval on May 21. Hartley drafted another memorial for them on June 1, but...
D : Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: Public Record Office David Hartley arrived in Paris on April 24. The following day he called on the individual American peace commissioners and found them eager to arrange for the opening of British and American ports to each other’s trade and to conclude as quickly as possible a definitive treaty of peace. On April 26 he went to Versailles,...
Having been long informed of your benevolent Sentiments towards peace I writt a letter to you on the 19th of last month thro the hands of Mr Laurens junr to renew that subject with you because I was aware at that time from conferences and correspondencies to wch I had been a party that the topic of peace wd soon become general. I understand that Mr Jay Dr Franklin Mr Laurens and yourself are...
Copy and press copy of copy: National Archives; copies: William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office It is with the sincerest Pleasure that I congratulate you on the happy Event which took Place Yesterday, viz., the Signature of the Definitive Treaty between our two Countries. I consider it as the auspicious Presage of returning...
Copies: National Archives (two), Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; transcript: National Archives The proposition which has been made for an universal & unlimited reciprocity of Intercourse & Commerce, between Great-Britain and the American United-States, requires a very serious Consideration on the part of Great-Britain, for the reasons already stated...
You may with great Truth assure the American Ministers of our ready and friendly disposition to receive any proposals from the United States for the forming such regulations as may tend to the mutual and reciprocal advantage of both Countries.— That his Majesty’s govern t w d at all times be ready to concur in the forming such a System as may fully answer every purpose of commercial as well as...
Two copies: National Archives; ALS (draft): Williams L. Clements Library I have received the honour of your Letter dated March 31. 1784 with the enclosures, wch. I have communicated to his Majesty’s Ministers. I have the Pleasure to inform you that the Ratification on our Part, is now making out, and that I have received orders to prepare for the Exchange at Paris with all convenient Speed....
As the Day is now fixed for the signatures of the Definitive Treaties between Great Britain, France & Spain, I beg leave to inform your Excellencies that I am ready to sign the Definitive Treaty between Great Britain & the United States of America, whenever it shall be convenient to you. I beg the Favour therefore of you to fix the Day. My Instructions confine me to Paris as the Place...
It is with the sincerest Pleasure that I congratulate you on the happy Event which took Place Yesterday, viz, the Signature of the Definitive Treaty between our two Countries. I consider it as the auspicious Presage of returning Confidence and of the future Intercourse of all good offices between us; I doubt not that our two Countries will entertain the same Sentiments, and that they will...
Permit me to address the enclosed Memorial to your Excellencies, and to explain to you my Reasons for So doing. It is because many Consequences now at a great Distance, and unforeseen by Us may arise between our two Countries, perhaps from very minute and incidental Transactions, which in their beginnings may be impercepteble and unsuspected as to their future Effects. Our respective...
1. That Lands belonging to Persons of any description which have not actually been sold shall be restored to the old Possessors without Price. 2. That an equal and free Participation of the different carrying Places, and the Navigation of all the Lakes and Rivers of that Country thro’ which the Water Line of Division passes between Canada and the United States shall be enjoyed fully and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I cannot imagine what has prevented my hearing from you for these two month relating to the Cartel. I therefore send you a copy of a letter from the board of Sick & Hurt to me of Novr 15 1779 wch is the place where we left off & where we stick now. I wish I cd expedite things but it is not in my power. You see where the matter has been Stopt these two...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 280–1. I write to you one line by this mail only to tell you that I have seen the Minister since I last wrote to you, and that he never did entertain the idea one Moment of any propositions being thrown out on your part in the least degree inconsistent with...
ALS : Library of Congress I take the opportunity of Mr Laurens going to Paris to transmitt one line to you, only to express to you my constant & affectionate remembrance of you, in your public character, & as a private friend; And my sincerest wishes for your personal health & happiness, and for success to all your pacific Counsels. The report wch prevails at present on this side of the water,...
Transcript: Library of Congress It is so many months since I have heard from you that I fear the Communication between the two Countries is but too effectually Stopt. I have writ to you from time to time letters which perhaps you have never received. My object is the same with yours viz. the restoration of peace. The Stoppage of communication between the two countries seems to have had the...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 269–74. I have recieved the favour of yours of the 15th of December by Mr. Alexander. I most heartily join with you in the wish that we could find some means to stop the spreading flames of this devilish war . I will not despair. The communications which he...
Transcript: Library of Congress Before you receive this you will probably have received my last, by a private Conveyance. You will find by that letter, that I have not been successfull in the negotiation in which I was so desirous to give assistance. Let me just ask you; if a truce of ten years be not practicable, what wd you think of a truce for one Year as a foundation for treating. My bias...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; transcript: Library of Congress Hartley, writing the day after Lord North revealed the government’s conciliatory plan, was more euphoric than that plan warranted. It had been in preparation since early December, precipitated first by the news of Saratoga and then by increasingly strong intimations of a forthcoming Franco-American alliance....