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Articles agreed upon by and between David Hartley Esquire, Minister Plenipotentiary of his Britannic Majesty for &c in behalf of his Said Majesty on the one Part, and J.A. B.F. J.J. and H.L, Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America for treating of Peace with the Minister Plenipotentiary of his Said Majesty, on their behalf, on the other Part, in Addition to those Articles...
DS : Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two), Public Record Office; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two.) Early on the morning of September 3, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and William Temple Franklin rode into Paris carrying four official copies of the treaty that would end the War for American Independence. Joined by Adams,...
Whereas, by the 6 th. Article of the Provisional Treaty of the 30 th of November 1782, it was agreed in these Words vizt “That there Shall be no future Confiscations made, nor any Prosecutions commenced, against any Person or Persons, for, or by Reason of, the Part which he or they may have taken in the present War, and that no Person Shall on that Account, Suffer any future Loss or Damage,...
Article. Commerce to be in force for Five Years unless sooner altered by a Treaty of Commerce 1. It is agreed that so soon as his Britannic Majesty, shall have withdrawn all his Armies Garrisons and Fleets, from the Said United states and from every Port Place and Harbour within the Same, according to the 7 Article of the Provisional Treaty of 30 Nov. 1782 all Ports in the Dominions of either...
Article. Manufactures. foreign Commodities. It is agreed, that American Merchants shall be allowed to import into any Part of the Dominions of his Britannic Majesty and there Sell and dispose of any Manufactures of the said United states or any other Merchandizes, of whatever kind of the Growth Production or Manufacture of any Part of the World, for the Purpose of making Remittances and paying...
Article. His Britannic Majesty agrees, that within Months from this Date, and as much Sooner as may be, he will withdraw all his Armies, Garrisons and Fleets, from the Said United States, and from every Port Place and Harbour within the Same, and without causing any Destruction, or carrying away any Negroes, or other Property of the American Inhabitants, and leaving in all Fortifications the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I cannot imagine what has prevented my hearing from you for these two month relating to the Cartel. I therefore send you a copy of a letter from the board of Sick & Hurt to me of Novr 15 1779 wch is the place where we left off & where we stick now. I wish I cd expedite things but it is not in my power. You see where the matter has been Stopt these two...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 280–1. I write to you one line by this mail only to tell you that I have seen the Minister since I last wrote to you, and that he never did entertain the idea one Moment of any propositions being thrown out on your part in the least degree inconsistent with...
ALS : Library of Congress I take the opportunity of Mr Laurens going to Paris to transmitt one line to you, only to express to you my constant & affectionate remembrance of you, in your public character, & as a private friend; And my sincerest wishes for your personal health & happiness, and for success to all your pacific Counsels. The report wch prevails at present on this side of the water,...
Transcript: Library of Congress It is so many months since I have heard from you that I fear the Communication between the two Countries is but too effectually Stopt. I have writ to you from time to time letters which perhaps you have never received. My object is the same with yours viz. the restoration of peace. The Stoppage of communication between the two countries seems to have had the...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 269–74. I have recieved the favour of yours of the 15th of December by Mr. Alexander. I most heartily join with you in the wish that we could find some means to stop the spreading flames of this devilish war . I will not despair. The communications which he...
Transcript: Library of Congress Before you receive this you will probably have received my last, by a private Conveyance. You will find by that letter, that I have not been successfull in the negotiation in which I was so desirous to give assistance. Let me just ask you; if a truce of ten years be not practicable, what wd you think of a truce for one Year as a foundation for treating. My bias...
Paris, 21 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:131–134 . LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. This memorial was Hartley’s response to the article that the commissioners had proposed on 29 April to open American and British ports to virtually unrestricted free trade, to which Hartley had at least tentatively agreed ( calendared, above
M r Hartley presents his Comp ts to M r Adams and if it be convenient to him, w d be glad to have the honour of waiting upon him and the gentlemen who are the other Commissioners and Ministers from the united States of America at 11 O’clock on Sunday morning, at M r Adams’s hotel, or any where else if more convenient. M r Hartley has had the pleasure of seeing D r Franklin who lives at the...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; transcript: Library of Congress Hartley, writing the day after Lord North revealed the government’s conciliatory plan, was more euphoric than that plan warranted. It had been in preparation since early December, precipitated first by the news of Saratoga and then by increasingly strong intimations of a forthcoming Franco-American alliance....
Copy: Library of Congress The enclosed letters will explain themselves. Mr. Wren is a very worthy man (I believe a dissenting Minister) at Portmouth who has devoted his attention in the most charitable manner towards the relief of the prisoners at Forton. When Mr. Thornton went to Forton I advanced him £50 according to your desire. If you approve the Continuance of his plan I can easily...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 286. Mr. Digges who will deliver this to you informs me that having been applied to for the purpose of communicating with Mr. Adams on the subject of his commission for treating of peace, he is now setting out for Amsterdam, and that he intends afterwards...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 266–8. Inclosed I send you a copy of a conciliatory bill which was proposed in the house of commons on the 27th of last month. It was rejected. You and I have had so much intercourse upon the subject of restoring peace between Great...
Copies: Public Record Office, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society August 12 and 13 were of far greater diplomatic consequence than this exchange of formal letters about the birth of an English princess (the present letter and the commissioners’ answer of the following day) would suggest. On Tuesday, August 12, at the weekly meeting of ministers at Versailles, Franklin and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress I recd two days ago notice at the Admiralty that the last terms wch I transmitted from you were accepted and agreed to, and that his Majesty had consented. I was likewise told that I might expect in a few days to receive special notice of the place and time of the exchange. As soon as I receive any such notice I will not...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 394–6. Yours I received by Major Young together with the work of your veritable philosophe , which is full of humanity. I was not before that, at a loss where I should have looked for my veritable philosophe in the present actual scene of public politics....
ALS : Library of Congress; copy: William L. Clements Library I am requested by Mr Dempster whom you must probably know by Parliamentary reputation to introduce to your acquaintance the bearer of this letter Dr Ross who proposes to settle in America as a Physician. I have no other acquaintance with him than thro Mr Dempster’s means but he appears by his conversation to be very ingenious and...
AL (draft): M.D.A.F.H.H. Hartley Russell (1955) on deposit in the Berkshire County Record Office; transcript: Library of Congress I writ to you as long ago as the 14th of last month to tell you that the administration here had given their consent to the exchange of prisoners at Calais and that they would agree to give any ship on your part a free passport from Brest to Calais upon your sending...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 277–280. I received yours of the 15th instant, this day. I must take the earliest opportunity of setting you right in one mistake, which runs through your whole letter, and which to you, under that mistake, must be a very delicate point. You seem to...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin . . . (4to ed.; 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 249. I will take care of all your commissions. This moment a second packet of infinite value is received, which I shall cherish as a mark of affection from you. I opened the letter by mistake which came with it, and soon saw it was not for me. I...
I told you last night that I felt myself unwell with the Commencement of a complaint on my breast. I am this morning obliged to be bled. I s hd be very much obliged to you if you w d be so good as to prevail upon your Collegues to favour me with a visit this morning as I really cannot come out myself. The sooner the better, because I hope with bleeding & one day’s nursing that I may get off...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 287–9. Enclosed with this I transmit to you the public parliamentary proceeding respecting the American war. If you will compare these proceedings with some others in several of the counties of this kingdom about two years ago, you will at once see the...
ALS : Library of Congress I have thought it a long while that my Confinement has prevented my seeing you. I was in hopes to have had the pleasure of seeing you to day, but I was indiscreet in going out the night before last, wch has encreased the pain & swelling of my foot. My foot is again rather better than it was yesterday, but I am afraid to venture out to day. I hope still to see you on...
Transcript: Library of Congress I take the opportunity of writing a line to you by Capt. Read, tho. I have not any thing now to say. We seem rather on this side the water to be expecters of news and events; more especially as to the proceedings and proposals from the Congress. As to my own opinion and wishes, they continue the same. I can only wish generally for peace, and for such measures on...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress In the course of a negotiation lately on foot I had at one time entertained hopes of Success. I am still inclined to hope that something is gained, perhaps in the minds of men, wch may hereafter serve as a reference to form some future basis of accommodation upon, when a more fortunate hour may come. You understand that...
ALS and incomplete copy: American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress I have the following answers to make to you from the board of Admiralty, in relation to yours of the 16th of June. The prisoners to be exchanged from hence will be taken From Forton and Plymouth in proportion to their numbers in each place, and to consist of those who have been the longest in confinement....
I have lately had some conversation with Mr. Bolton of Soho near Birmingham relative to a proposed recoinage of the Copper money of this Country, for which he is at present in negotiation with the British ministry. Upon this occasion he has shewn to me from the Charles town Gazette of april 14 1790 the report which you have presented to Congress upon a similar point in your States, by which I...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Yours of June 5 per favour of Mr. Strange received relating to the exchange of prisoners In answer to which I send you a copy of a letter of mine to you of June the 5th which I transcribe least by any accident it should have miscarried. I am authorized by the administration and the board of admiralty to make the following proposition, That you should send...
(I) ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; transcript: Library of Congress; (II) ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress The bearer of this, & of some other papers (Mr. D ) is a very sensible & worthy gentleman, with whom I have had the pleasure of contracting an acquaintance, since the commencement of the American troubles, originally upon the...
(I) and (II) transcript: Library of Congress I shall hope soon to have an opportunity of writing to you by a private hand, & shall defer what I have to say till that opportunity. In the mean time let me only tell you that I am still of the same opinion that I have always held that there is not yet any alienation between the nations of GB & NA. I think likewise that what has passed in the way...
Transcript: Library of Congress I thank you for your very friendly and prudent consideration of my situation in this Country with respect to correspondencies on the subject of the unfortunate differences between the Country and America. Free communications on this subject are by Law interdicted which I think to be one of the greatest misfortunes of the present times. If those who are lovers of...
Transcripts: National Archives, Massachusetts Historical Society I write to you only one Line just to inform you that a general Order is issued, by our Government, for the release of all the american Prisoners every where. I have had this from Lord Shelburne, who informed me that the Order was not partial or conditional, but general and absolute. I heartily congratulate you upon this first...
By the favour of Coll. Smith I trouble you with this line of which the purpose and contents are only to entitle me to your remembrance. I sincerely regret when I had first the pleasure of your acquaintance that the time allowed me to profit by your friendship was so short. This, for private and personal reasons of respect and friendship to you—and for public reasons, because I know your...
ALS : American Philosophical Society As I enclose this in the same cover as one from my Brother, his letter anticipates every thing that I have to say to you at present. I beg leave to join in the recommendation to you of Mr Joshua Grigby who with the Spirit of Youth & activity wishes to see the new world. I hope the future intercommunication between this Country and America will obliterate...
(I) Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society; (II) copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Public Record Office; (III) copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I send you a Paper entitled Supplemental Treaty , the Substance of which I sent you some time ago, as I read it, in part of a Speech in the H. of Commons. I have given a Copy of it to M. L [Laurens], as the Grounds upon which my Friend...
(I) ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress (II) ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress I thank you for yours of Sept. 3d inclosing those beautiful lines from Dante to the late Mistress of his affections, of which I feel the whole force. In return I send you another most pathetic Sonnet. I have told you before that my heart is always...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress Yours of 22d of february received. I have been as much discontented with the delay respecting the Exchange of prisoners as you can have been, and before the receipt of yours, I had made an heavy complaint and remonstrance upon the Subject. I have now the Satisfaction to tell you, that the first Cartel ship has actually left...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Having an opportunity of a conveyance to you, I write one short line (as my notice is very sudden and short) just to tell you how happy I shd have been to have had an opportunity of seeing and Conversing with you. I fear that pleasure must be delayed, but it wd make me infinitely happy to look forward to that pleasure upon some future occasion.— At present...
I am infinitely obliged to you for the favour of your letter which contains most interesting information to me who wish to maintain such friendly and candid correspondencies upon American matters for prospects of future times. At present by the public appearance of things the considerations of American matters do not seem to proceed. At least for my part I am not informed or instructed by...
Copies: National Archives (London), William L. Clements Library; transcript: National Archives I have the honour to inform you that I have transmitted to London, the ratification on the part of Congress of the definitive treaty of peace, between Great Britain and the united states of america. I am ordered to represent to you, that a want of form appears in the first paragraph of that...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I send by this date another letter with enclosures relating to the Exchange of prisoners. I hope in God that nothing will happen to interrupt that Exchange wch I look upon as a link of communication wch may by degrees lead us to farther pacific intercourses. The only object of my thoughts is by every possible means to soften animosities and to counteract by...
ALS : Library of Congress I have not recd any letters from England—but I hear that a continuation of the Amern bill is passed. That is all the news that I hear— My leg has been very bad again. I now write in bed. I have been confined for these last four days almost entirely to my bed & mattrass. The pain now begins again to abate.— Your ever affecte Addressed: To Dr Franklin / &c &c &c / Passy...
May I beg the favour of you to give me your assistance officially, and as an old friend, towards obtaining letters patent in the united states of America, for the improvement of one of the most universal and important manufactures for the uses of life, that can exist in any country in the world; I mean the manufacture of all edged instruments of steel; than which none is more extensive or...
Transcript: Library of Congress I send you for fear of accidents copies of two letters wch I have lately writ to you. I told you in my last that I hoped that our negotiation had done some good upon at least the minds of Men they had not been immediately as effectual as I cd have wished. Perhaps you may incline to the same opinion when you see the last paragraph of the King’s Speech viz that...
ALS : Public Record Office I send you a copy of the petition from the County of Berks for lenient measures with America, which my Brother and I have signed with about a thousand others. Some time ago the ministerial agents began to move for vindictive addresses, and got many from boroughs, several of them by surprize and management, as I have been informed by public newspapers. All these...