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Transcript: Library of Congress I take the opportunity of writing a line to you by Capt. Read, tho. I have not any thing now to say. We seem rather on this side the water to be expecters of news and events; more especially as to the proceedings and proposals from the Congress. As to my own opinion and wishes, they continue the same. I can only wish generally for peace, and for such measures on...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am very glad to collect by a Phrase in the letter from the Congress to the Canadians, that they think once more of imploring the Attention of their Sovereign. I can give you no information of the State of the Ministry, I should be one of the last to be informed of their counsels. The great fear that I entertain, is, least they should make things desperate...
ALS : Public Record Office; copy: Clements Library Hartley’s cast of mind was similar to that of the peace negotiators with whom Franklin dealt during his last months in England. All of them regarded reconciliation as a problem to be analyzed, ordered, and reduced to rational terms from which a rational solution might emerge. Barclay and Fothergill pinned their hopes on negotiating by...
ALS : Public Record Office I send you a copy of the petition from the County of Berks for lenient measures with America, which my Brother and I have signed with about a thousand others. Some time ago the ministerial agents began to move for vindictive addresses, and got many from boroughs, several of them by surprize and management, as I have been informed by public newspapers. All these...
ALS : Public Record Office Some American friends have desired to have an account drawn out of Mr. Hartleys proposition for terms of accommodation, drawn up with a view to send it to some of their friends in America for their opinion, therefore an account of the plan of those motions which are to be actually moved in the house next week has been drawn up from part of the letter which was sent...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress It is so long since I have had the pleasure of hearing from you that I fear the administration has but too effectually stopt the Channel of Communication between this Country and its colonies. I have allways dreaded this event as fatal and final to the prospect of national reconciliation. When in any contention the parties...
Transcript: Library of Congress It is so many months since I have heard from you that I fear the Communication between the two Countries is but too effectually Stopt. I have writ to you from time to time letters which perhaps you have never received. My object is the same with yours viz. the restoration of peace. The Stoppage of communication between the two countries seems to have had the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society We have striven, to the utmost of our limited powers, for reconciliation between Great Britain and America. If that is become impossible, let us, at least, not relax our endeavours to obtain peace . Upon what ground wou’d it be possible to establish peace? By your letter to Lord Howe, which has been lately published here, as well as from all other accounts,...
Transcript: Library of Congress I thank you for your very friendly and prudent consideration of my situation in this Country with respect to correspondencies on the subject of the unfortunate differences between the Country and America. Free communications on this subject are by Law interdicted which I think to be one of the greatest misfortunes of the present times. If those who are lovers of...
Copy: Library of Congress The enclosed letters will explain themselves. Mr. Wren is a very worthy man (I believe a dissenting Minister) at Portmouth who has devoted his attention in the most charitable manner towards the relief of the prisoners at Forton. When Mr. Thornton went to Forton I advanced him £50 according to your desire. If you approve the Continuance of his plan I can easily...