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Previous to a more particular discussion of the merits of the Treaty, it may be useful to advert to a suggestion which has been thrown out, namely that it was foreseen by many, that the mission to Great Britain would produce no good result, and that the event has corresponded with the anticipation. The reverse of this position is manifestly true. All must remember the very critical posture of...
The manner in which the power of Treaty as it exists in the Constitution was understood by the Convention, in framing it, and by the people in adopting it, is the point next to be considered. As to the sense of the Convention, the secrecy with which their deliberations were conducted does not permit any formal proof of the opinions and views which prevailed in digesting the power of Treaty....
The sixth article stipulates compensation to British Creditors for losses and damages which may have been sustained by them, in consequence of certain legal impediments, which since the Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, are alleged to have obstructed the recovery of debts bona fide contracted with them before the peace. To a man who has a due sense of the sacred obligation of a just debt, a...
It will be useful, as it will simplify the Examination of the commercial articles of the Treaty, to bear in mind and preserve the Division that we find established by the 12. 13. & the 14. & 15. articles. Each respects a particular Branch or portion of the trade between the two Countries, the regulations whereof, differ from, and are severally independent of each other. Thus one is relative to...
The course thus far pursued in the discussion of the 18th article has inverted the order of it as it stands in the Treaty. It is composed of three clauses the two last of which have been first examined. I thought it adviseable in the outset to dispose of an objection which has been the principal source of clamour. The first clause, or that which remains to be examined, enumerates the articles...
The discussion in the two last numbers has shewn if I mistake not, that this Country by no means stands upon such good ground with regard to the inexecution of the Treaty of peace as some of our official proceedings have advanced and as many among us have too lightly creditted. The task of displaying this truth has been an unwelcome one. As long as a contrary doctrine was either a mere essay...
The Second Article of the Treaty stipulates that his Britannic Majesty will withdraw all his troops and garrisons from all posts and places within the boundary lines assigned by the Treaty of Peace to the U States; and that this evacuation shall take place on or before the first day of June 1796—the United States in the mean time at their discretion extending their settlements to any part...
One of the particulars in which our Envoy is alleged to have fallen short of what might and ought to have been done respects the time for the surrender of the Western posts. It is alleged, that there ought either to have been an immediate surrender or some guarantee or surety for the performance of the new promise. Both parts of the alternative presuppose that Great Britain was to have no will...
Agreement between Alexander Hamilton on behalf of Nicholas Low & Abijah Hammond of the one part and John Campbell on the other part. The said John Campbell agrees to proceed forthwith to Scotland in the Kingdom of Great Britain there to endeavor to purchase and to ship from thence to the united States on account of the said Nicholas Low & Abijah Hammond the following articles, Eight Stocking...
110[Candor], [18 August 1792] (Hamilton Papers)
[Philadelphia] Gazette of the United States , August 18, 1792. Philip Marsh has written: “On August 18th, answering a charge by ‘G.’ in the National Gazette for the 15th, ‘Candor’ demolished the idea that Fenno had a monopoly of Treasury printing. By the undeniable tone of authority and the unmistakable style, ‘Candor’ with little doubt is Hamilton again” (“Hamilton’s Neglected Essays,...
In addition to the official report of our proceedings at Amboy, which your Excellency will perceive have terminated in the manner you expected, we have the honor to give you an account of the steps we took, in consequence of the second part of your instructions, relative to a private conversation. But before we enter upon this, we think it our duty to inform you, that we have every reason to...
We beg leave to inform Your Excellency, that in the private report of our proceedings at Amboy dated the 26th. March, we omitted mentioning, (though it is to be inferred) that in the conversation which passed on the subject of accounts, it was explicitly declared by us, that if any particular sum should be accepted agreeable to the ideas of The British Gentlemen, it was not in any manner to be...
Minutes of the proceedings of the Commissioners, on the part of His Excellency General Washington and of His Excellency General sir Henry Clinton. The Commissioners being met, agree to the following preliminaries. That copies of the powers should be interchanged, and they were interchanged accordingly. That the limits of the neutral ground should extend three miles round Amboy, that Town being...
Plan of exchange for the Troops of Convention, in three Divisions to be formed as equally, as the exchanging by Corps will allow, from the Strength of the Rank & file, each of the two first Divisions to have a Major General and a Brigadier General, and the third The Lieutenant General and a Brigadier General exchanged with them. The Regiments to which the Brigadier Generals belong to be...
Major General St Clair Lt Col Carrington and Lt. Col Hamilton give it as their opinion as the result of the conversation held upon the subject that the most likely plan for effecting the exchange in contemplation is to confine it to the unexceptionable characters on both sides first exchanging all the prisoners of war and then the troops of convention for the balance, according to the...
To His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of The United States of America. We The Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency “to treat, confer, determine and conclude upon a General Cartel for the exchange and accommodation of prisoners of war including the troops of The Convention of Saratoga and all matters whatsoever which might be properly...
Attempts in different shapes have been made to repel the charges which have been brought against the Secretary of State. The defence of him however in the quarter in which he has been principally assailed, has hitherto gone no further than a mere shew of defending him. I speak as to his improper connection with the Editor of the National Gazette. But a more serious and more plausible effort...
For the GAZETTE of the UNITED STATES. If perseverance can supply the want of judgment, Mr. Jefferson has an excellent advocate in the writer of his “ Vindication .” But I mistake, if his last attempt is not found to involve still more deeply the character he wishes to extricate. To repel the imputation on Mr Jefferson, arising from the advice which he gave to Congress respecting the debt to...
For the Gazette of the United States. Aristides complains that the American has charged Mr. Jefferson with being the patron and promoter of national disunion, national insignificance, public disorder and discredit . The American however, has only affirmed, that “the real or pretended political tenets of that gentleman tend ” to those points. The facts which have been established clearly...
For the GAZETTE of the UNITED STATES. It was my intention to have closed with my last paper, the discussion of Mr. Jefferson’s conduct in the particulars which have been suggested; but the singular complexion of the last number No. IV. of a series of papers originating in the American Daily Advertiser, obliges me to resume it. As if bold assertion were capable of imposing any thing for truth,...
For the Gazette of The United States To Aristides The “ American ” to confirm the inference resulting from the official connection between the Secretary of State and the Editor of the National Gazette, appeals to a conformity of the political principles and views of that officer, with those which are sedulously inculcated in that Gazette. If this conformity exists, it certainly affords a...
To Aristides Though there would be no great hazard of mistake, in inferring the Writer of the Paper under the signature of Aristides, from “the appropriate and prominent features” which characterise the stile of that paper; yet I forbear to imitate the example which has been set with too little decorum, by naming or describing the supposed author. The similitude of stile or any other...
For Postage of letters on Public Service from 23rd May ’til 1st. June 1800 } 5.60 Recv’d of Jno. Wilkins Junr. Qr. M. Genl by the hand of Lt. Colo. Aaron Ogden Dpy. Qr. Mr. Genl. the above five ⁶⁰⁄₁₀₀ Dolls. in full. $5.60 ADS , The American Swedish Historical Museum, Philadelphia. H’s endorsement reads: “The within postage being on public account I approve of its being paid by Aarn Ogdn Esqr....
The hon. Mr. Hamilton . This is one of those subjects, Mr. Chairman, on which objections very naturally arise, and assume the most plausible shape. Its address is to the passions, and its first impressions create a prejudice, before cool examination has an opportunity for exertion. It is more easy for the human mind to calculate the evils, than the advantages of a measure; and vastly more...
Mr. Hamilton . The honorable gentleman from Ulster has given a turn to the introduction of those papers, which was never in our contemplation. He seems to insinuate that they were brought forward, with a view of shewing an inconsistency in the conduct of some gentlemen—perhaps of himself. Sir, the exhibition of them had a very different object. It was to prove that this state once experienced...
The hon. Mr. Hamilton then rose. Mr. Chairman the honorable Member, who spoke yesterday, went into an explanation of a variety of circumstances to prove the expediency of a change in our national government, and the necessity of a firm union: At the same time he described the great advantages which this State, in particular, receives from the confederacy, and its peculiar weaknesses when...
Mr. Hamilton then reassumed his argument. When, said he, I had the honor to address the committee yesterday, I gave a history of the circumstances which attended the Convention, when forming the Plan before you. I endeavored to point out to you the principles of accommodation, on which this arrangement was made; and to shew that the contending interests of the States led them to establish the...
The Hon. Mr. Hamilton . Mr. Chairman I rise to take notice of the observations of the hon. member from Ulster. I imagine the objections he has stated, are susceptible of a complete and satisfactory refutation. But before I proceed to this, I shall attend to the arguments advanced by the gentlemen from Albany and Dutchess. These arguments have been frequently urged, and much confidence has been...
Mr. Hamilton . I only rise to observe that the gentleman has misunderstood me. What I meant to express was this; that if we argued from possibilities only; if we reasoned from chances, or an ungovernable propensity to evil, instead of taking into view the controul, which the nature of things, or the form of the constitution provided; the argument would lead us to withdraw all confidence from...
Mr. Hamilton . I recollect well the alteration which the gentleman alludes to; but, it by no means militates against my idea of the principles on which the convention acted at the time the report of the committee was under deliberation. This alteration did not take place till the convention was near rising, and the business compleated; when his excellency the president expressing a wish that...