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Having attentively considered the subject of your letter of the 19th April last, and the questions submitted to us, we shall now communicate the result of our reflections on the several questions in the order they are stated. Question 1. Have the Corporation of New York any title to the land under the water of Hudson’s River opposite to and adjoining Powles Hook? Answer. Comparing the...
[ Grange, New York, April 26, 1804. “I would not pronounce against the power of the Directors to go into the operation you mention; but I think it liable to so much question as hardly to be advisable without the sanction of the stock holders at a general meeting. I should perceive no difficulty in their giving a gross sum out of their profits for the renewal or extention of their charter. The...
[ April 20, 1804. “As to any right of property claimed by the corporation of this City to the land under water we have ourselves no doubt that it is wholly unfounded, and if you should be of the same opinion we wish it to be expressed. This will in the first instance depend on the Charter of this City. With respect to the claim of jurisdiction by this State we at present wish your opinion only...
I did not write to you on the subject of the awards, because I was in correspondence with Mr. Jacob Van Rensselaer respecting the matter. He has sent me the draughts of deeds which I shall in a few days inspect, and return with such suggestions as may be requisite. The things most urgent are 1. The completion of the survey, which Mr. R. writes me is in train. 2. The appointment of a guardian...
The post of to day brought me a letter from you, and another from Mr. ——. I have no doubt but the latter would serve you if he could; but he cannot at this time. On the whole I would advise you to return to New-York, and accept any respectable employment in your way, ’till an opportunity of something better shall occur. ’Tis by patience and perseverance that we can expect to vanquish...
[ New York, April 10, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Vous m’aves fait La remise Le 10. avril dernier.” Letter not found. ]
You were probably acquainted in this Country with Colonel Toussard who will have the honor of delivering you this letter. He has filled several stations in our Military service at different periods and always with much credit to himself and advantage to the service. During our revolutionary war he lost an arm in an action in which he displayed much zeal and bravery, and to my knowlege was...
Presuming on the acquaintance, from which I derived so much pleasure during your stay in this Country, I am going to take a very great liberty. It concerns a near relation of mine, Mr. Alexander Hamilton, now a prisoner of war on parol, at Paris. His brother, from whom I have just received a letter informs me, that being upon a visit to the Continent as a Traveller, he was overtaken by the war...
I have perused the Bill & am of opinion that the prohibition will extend only to Associations or Companies of which the primary and essential purpose or end is, to issue notes make discounts &c, in other words, to operate as a Bank, and not to Commercial companies which may incidentally transact such business. Yet there is some degree of Ambiguity on the subject and questions may arise. The...
Albany, March 10, 1804. Convey to the heirs of Rutger Bleecker the land in Cosby Manor which Hamilton had purchased in trust for them in 1797. DS , Oneida County Clerk’s Office, Utica, New York. Bleecker had been an Albany merchant. See “Deed from Peter Goelet, Robert Morris, and William Popham,” April 4, 1797 . See also the introductory note to Philip Schuyler to H, August 31, 1795 , and...
I had the honor of receiving, yesterday, your Excellency’s letter of the 6th instant. It is agreeable to me to find in it a confirmation of the inference, that you had given no countenance to the supposition of my agency or cooperation in the project, to which the story of Judge Purdy relates; and it only remains for me to regret that it is not in your power to furnish the additional clue, of...
On Saturday last I sent you a letter of which the foregoing is a copy, to which I have as yet received no reply. Intending to leave this place for New York on Saturday next, it is important that I should receive an answer before that day. I have the honor to be   Your Excelly’s Obed servt ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. H to Clinton, March 2, 1804 .
[ Albany, March 6, 1804. On March 22, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Je nai recu que hier, Votre Lettre du 6.” Letter not found. ]
If our correspondence does not terminate with your letter of the 29th. of February, received yesterday, I wish it to be understood that it proceeds merely from the desire of removing all ambiguity from a transaction, in which my character may be materially interested. It is perhaps the natural inference from what you have stated, that nothing took place on your part, to sanction or corroborate...
It is now a long time since a very ⟨odious⟩ slander has been in circulation to the prejudice of my character. It has come to my ears in more than one way, but always ’till lately without the disclosure ⟨of⟩ any source to which I could resort for explanation or detection. Within a few days, Mr. Kane of this City related to me a story as coming from Judge Purdy, in substance very similar to the...
On Saturday the 25th of february 1804 I went with General Hamilton to the lodgings of Judge Purdy in Albany who was at home. General H. said that he had called on Mr. Purdy, supposing he had had sufficient time for reflection, to know who was the person alluded to in the conversation he had had with him a day or two before when Mr. Kane was present. Mr. Purdy said he had thought of it, but had...
You will have heared, before this reaches you, of the fluctuations and changes which have taken place in the measures of the reigning party, as to a candidate for Governor; and you will probably have also been informed that pursuant to the opinions professed by our friends, before I left New York, I had taken an open part in favour of Mr. Lansing. It is a fact to be regretted, though...
Since the receipt of your letter on the subject of the impeachment of the Judges, this is perhaps the first moment, that indifferent health and excessive occupation have permitted a reply. I view the attempts which are making completely in the light you do; and have very little doubt that they are in prosecution of a deliberate plan to prostrate the independence of the Judicial Department, and...
Reasons why it is desirable that Mr. Lansing rather than Col. Burr should succeed. 1. Col Burr has steadily pursued the ⟨track⟩ of democratic policies. This he has done either from principle or from calculation . If the former he is not likely now to change his plan, when the fœderalists are prostrate and their enemies predominent. If the latter, he will certainly not at this time relinquish...
I send you three Notes on account of my bond each for 800 Ds as agreed. On Saturday I took the bond in the Country & forgot to bring it to Town with the calculation; so that ⟨I m⟩ust defer the completion of the arrange⟨ment⟩ to my return from Albany. But you may consider it as done & in⟨form⟩ your correspondents accordingly. Yrs. with gre⟨at⟩ regard ALS , Mr. Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur,...
[ New York, January 24, 1804. On July 12, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Le 24 Janvier aussy dernier, Vous maves fait la remise.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, January 11, 1804. On January 18, 1804, Le Guen wrote to Hamilton : “Je n’ai recu que Ce matin, La Lettre dont Vous mavés favorisé Le 11.” Letter not found. ]
I arrived here, my beloved, about five this afternoon. According to my first day’s journey, I ought now to be much further advanced. But some how Riddle sprained the ancle of one of his hind legs, which very much retarded my progress to day. By care and indulgence, he is much better this Evening; so that I count upon being able to reach Albany with him early on Wednesday morning. I have...
54Plan for a Garden, [1803] (Hamilton Papers)
1. Transplant fruit trees from the other side of the stable. 2. Fences repaired. repaired behind stable. The cross fence at the foot of the hill? Potatoes Bradhursts? Ground may be removed and used for this purpose. Cows no longer to be permitted to range. 3. The Sod and earth which were removed in making the walks where it is good may be thrown upon the grounds in front of the House, and a...
New York, December 12, 1803. Discusses the contents of a letter “this morning received from Mr. Pendleton” concerning an agreement made between Henry Sands and the Bank of New York which provided for the sale of mortgaged property owned by Sands in order to pay Sands’s creditors. AL [S], Bank of New York, New York City. For background to this letter, see H to LeRoy, September 19, 1802 . The...
New York, December 9, 1803. Gives opinion concerning the effect of the French arrêt of June 20, 1803, on neutral shipping. ALS , The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Gouverneur was a New York City merchant. For the full text of this letter and a discussion of its contents, see Goebel, Law Practice Julius Goebel, Jr., and Joseph H. Smith, eds., The Law Practice of Alexander Hamilton:...
[ New York, November, 1800. The description of this letter in the dealer’s catalogue reads: “deals with legal matters.” Letter not found. ] LS , sold by Goodspeed’s Bookstore, Boston, February, 1942. For background to this letter, see H, Cooper, and Ogden to FitzSimons, Herman LeRoy, William Tilghman, and Matthew Pearce, October 17, 1800, note 1 ; November 17, 1800 . FitzSimons, Higbee, and...
This is the fifth letter, Madam, that ⟨I shall⟩ have written to you, without yet having had ⟨the pleasure⟩ of knowing that one has reached your hands. This ⟨situation⟩ is matter of no small regret to us, and it would be still more perplexing and painful did we not understand th⟨at⟩ others of your friends are in a like situation. Being a common misfortune, we cannot impute it to any...
New York, November 12, 1803. Urges “the utmost caution and care” in preparing John B. Church’s case for hearing before the Supreme Court. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. This letter concerns the case of John B. Church, Jr. v Tuthill Hubbart . See H to Theophilus Parsons, December 31, 1801 ; H to Otis, October 8, 1803 .
This morning my b⟨e⟩loved Eliza I leave Albany for C⟨lav⟩erack, my health greatly mended ⟨a⟩nd I hope to make but a short stay there. My plan is to go to Poughkepsie and there embark. I shall be glad to find that my dear little Philip is weaned, if circumstances have rendered it prudent. It is of importance to me to rest quietly in your bosom. Adieu my beloved. Kiss all the Children for me....