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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Wolcott, Oliver, Jr.
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Wolcott, Oliver, Jr." AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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Every one who can properly appreciate the situation of our Affairs at this moment, in all the extent of possible circumstances, must be extremely anxious for such a course of conduct in our Government which will unite the utmost prudence with energy. It has been a considerable time my wish that a Commission extraordinary Madison Pinkney Cabot should be constituted to go to France to explain...
I have received your letter of March 31. I hope nothing in my last was misunderstood. Could it be necessary I would assure you that no one has a stronger convinction than myself of the purity of the motives which direct your public Conduct or of the good sense and judgment by which it is guided. If I have a fear (you will excuse my frankness), it is lest the strength of your feelings, the...
The post of today brought me a letter from you. I am just informed that an order is come to the Custom House not to clear out any Vessel if armed , unless destined for the East Indies. Under the present circumstances I very much doubt the expediency of this measure. The excesses of France justify passiveness in the Government and its inability to protect the Merchants required that it should...
The consideration for the candidates in the better part of the community stands nearly thus. Clarkeson , ver Plank , Fish = Walker , Burrall , Giles ,
You some time ago put a question to me, which through hurry, I never answered— viz whether there can be any distinction between the provision in the Treaty with Great Britain respecting British debts and that respecting spoliations , as to the power of the Commissioners to re judge the decisions of the Courts . I answer that I can discover none . I am of opinion however that in the exercise of...
I have received your two letters of the 6th & 7. The last announces to me no more than I feared. Nor do I believe any sufficient external impulse can be given to save us from disgrace . This however will be thought of. I regret that you appear remote from the idea of a house tax simply without combining the land. I do not differ from your general principle. The truth is a solid one, that the...
I have received the inclosed letter which I send to you with only this remark that I have a good opinion of the writer . I know that the pretensions of the person recommended will be weighed in an equal scale & will have all the attention to which they are intitled. Yrs. truly ALS , RG 59, General Records of the State Department, Applications and Recommendations, 1792–1801, National Archives....
Give me leave to remind you of your promise to send me the documents and information which authenticate the situation of Mr. Beaumarchais as to the unaccounted for Million . Allow me also to mention to you another point. I hear there is a plan among the Directors of the Bank to transfer the management of their concerns from the House of Cazenove to that of Baring. When the arrangement was...
I thank you for your last letter. The opinion with regard to the conduct of the President is very important. As to our finances all will be well, if our councils are wise & vigorous; if not, all will go to ruin. I fear there is not among the friends sufficient capaciousness of views for the greatness of the occasion. I send the inclosed because it required correction. AL , Connecticut...
I received from you not long since a letter on the subject of a fit person for naval Agent which in the hurry of my business I forgot. I think you mentioned in it for consideration Col Stevens & Mr. Blagg. Col Stevens is an active man not wanting in intelligence who has latterly been employed in navigation & probably has some relative ideas. He is however pretty largely in other business &...
The answer from The President to the Commander in Chief &c of New Jersey contains in the close a very indiscreet passage. The sentiment is intemperate & revolutionary. It is not for us, particularly for the Government, to breathe an irregular or violent spirit. Hitherto I have much liked the Presidents answers, as in the main within proper bounds & calculated to animate and raise the public...
Further measures adviseable to be taken without delay I To authorise the President to proceed forthwith to raise the 10000 men already ordered. II To establish an academy for naval & military instruction. This is a very important measure and ought to be permanent. III To provide for the immediate raising of a corps of Non Commissioned officers (viz) serjeants & Corporals sufficient with the...
I understand that the Collector of Philadelphia will speedily offer his resignation & that McPherson does not incline to be the successor—but that Major Jackson is desirous of it. If all this be so—and if your experience of his conduct in his present station gives you a confidence that he would execute the Office of Collector well, it would gratify me to see him appointed. Jackson has more...
Col Burr sets out today for Philadelphia. I have some reasons for wishing that the administration may manifest a cordiality to him. It is not impossible he will be found a useful cooperator. I am aware there are different sides but the case is worth the experiment. He will call on McHenry upon going to the City. Yrs. truly ALS , Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford. H and Aaron Burr were...
I have this moment seen a Bill brought into the Senate intitled a Bill to define more particularly the crime of Treason &c. There are provisions in this Bill which according to a cursory view appear to me highly exceptionable & such as more than any thing else may endanger civil War. I have not time to point out my objections by this post but I will do it tomorrow. I hope sincerely the thing...
You are probably apprised that in announcing to the General Officers their appointments, they are told that the emoluments are to be suspended until called into actual service and that as a consequence of this plan they are to remain inactive. The project suits admirably my private arrangements, by leaving me to pursue in full extent my profession. But I believe it accords neither with the...
Your two letters of the 9th. reached this place during an absence on necessary business which only terminated on Saturday. Our friend McHenry has adopted the ideas suggested to him. And you may rely on my effectual cooperation. At the same time, as a total dislocation of residence, to fulfil in all its extent the idea you intimate, would be unqualified ruin to me, I must endeavor to avoid it....
No one knows better than yourself how difficult and oppressive is the collection even of taxes very moderate in their amount if there be a defective circulation. According to all the phœnomena which fall under my notice this is our case in the interior parts of the Country. Again Individual Capitals & consequently the faculty of direct loans is not very extensive in the U States. The Banks can...
[ New York, September 18, 1798. On September 19, 1798, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton and referred to “your Letter of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, December 20, 1798. On December 21, 1798, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton : “I have recd. your favour of the 20th.” Letter not found. ]
I have embraced every opportunity since the receipt of yours of the 21st to obtain light on the subject of the loan. But my research has been essentially fruitless. Opinions are as various as they are vague. You must therefore conjecture, and you ought to act on the sure side for selling the loan. For my part, I retain the opinion that the loan ought to be upon eight per Cent Interest, the...
It is natural for people where their interest is concerned to die hard. Mr. Juhel, the bearer of this, goes to Philadelphia to lay before you some supplementary evidence with regard to the Ship Germania, which he hopes may vary your determination. At his request I give him this line to you merely to say—that he is a Merchant of this City of Reputation, and so far as his conduct has fallen...
I hope you will have understood that I did not mean by any thing in my late letter to blame the plan pursued with regard to vessels arriving contrary to the Non-Intercourse laws. I mean only to give you testimony of the character of an Individual & to place before you my professional ideas of the defective wording of the law as a kind of caution in the execution. I agree with you that the...
I send you in confidence the copy of a letter of this date to the Secretary of War and of the plan to which it refers. Consider it well. Make the Secretary of War talk to you about it, without letting him know that I have sent it to you—And urge the establishment of some plan which will effectually organise this important branch of our Military service. The proper course in the interior of the...
When lately in Philadelphia, I mention’d to you that the Secretary of War had given me to expect some Communication from you previous to the Execution of an Order which he has given me respecting a Military Escort to protect the marking of an Indian boundary line. This is intended to remind you of the matter and to repeat to you that I wait for this Communication. With great respect   I have...
I send you the enclosed. If any good use can be made of it you will do it. I have been in Massachusettes, New Hampshire & Rhode Island. There is little doubt of Fœderal Electors in all. But there is considerable doubt of a perfect Union in favour of Pinckney. The leaders of the first class are generally right but those of the second class are too much disposed to be wrong. It is essential to...
I have two days since written to Mr. Adams a respectful letter on the subject I heretofore mentioned to you. Occupations at Court prevented its being sooner done. But I wait with impatience for the statement of facts which you promised me. It is plain that unless we give our reasons in some form or other—Mr. Adam’s personal friends seconded by the Jacobins will completely run us down in the...
[ New York, August 19, 1800. On September 3, 1800, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton : “I am favoured with your Letters of the 3d. and 19th.” Letter of August 19 not found. ]
As I hinted to you some time since, I have drafted a letter which it is my wish to send to influential individuals in the New England States. I hope from it two advantages the promoting of Mr. Pinckney’s election and the vindication of ourselves. You may depend upon it a very serious impression has been made on the public mind by the partisans of Mr. Adams to our disadvantage; that the facts...
It is now, my Dear Sir, ascertained that Jefferson or Burr will be President and it seems probable that they will come with equal votes to the House of Representatives. It is also circulated here that in this event the Fœderalists in Congress or some of them talk of preferring Burr. I trust New England at least will not so far lose its head as to fall into this snare. There is no doubt but...
[ New York, December 17, 1800. On December 25, 1800, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton : “I have recd. your favours of the 16th. & 17th.” Letter of December 17 not found. ]
Your last letter, My Dear Sir, has given me great pain; not only because it informed me that the opinion in favour of Mr. Burr was increasing among the Fœderalists, but because it also told me that Mr. Sedgwick was one of its partizans. I have a letter from this Gentleman in which he expresses decidedly his preference of Mr. Jefferson. I hope you have been mistaken and that it is not possible...
My absence from New York to attend the Court here has put it out of my power to answer sooner your letter of the 13th instant. The characters which occur to me as proper to be considered for Collector are these— Benjamin Walker —This Gentleman you know as well as I do. He is every way qualified and fit, and had he remained in the place of naval officer he might, qualified as he is, have looked...
I imagine, My Dear Sir, by the letter which the post of yesterday brought me from you, that you have supposed that something not quite satisfactory to me had occurrd in relation to the erection of a Hospital at Rhode Island. This I assure you has not been the case, nor has any thing come under my view, which could lead me to think that there has been cause for blame in any quarter. It happened...