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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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The undersigned takes the liberty to request, that the Consulate at Cuba, may be entrusted to his charge. He regrets he cannot urge any exclusive merit , to entitle him to a situation, so important & respectable. Should however a successful application justify this intrusion, the Government shall not be disappointed in its confidence. I am sir with much respect Your Ob. Hum Sert. RC ( DNA : RG...
[ New York, May 20, 1801. On May 26, 1801, Madison wrote to Hamilton : “I have received your letter of the 20th.” Letter not found. ]
You will oblige me by taking the trouble to peruse the Report which accompanies this; and if the weather permit, I will call upon you sometime tomorrow or next day to converse on the subject of it. I remain with great esteem and regard   D Sir Yr Obed ser It will not be disagreeable to me if after perusal you hand it over to Mr. Jefferson. ALS , University of Virginia. Presumably this is a...
You will oblige me by taking the trouble to peruse the Report which accompanies this; and if the weather permit I will call upon you sometime tomorrow or next day to converse on the Subject of it. I remain with great esteem and regard Dr Sir Yr Obed Ser It will not be disagreeable to me if after perusal you hand it over to Mr. Jefferson. RC ( ViU : Cabell Gwathmey Collection, microfilm)....
If Mr. Madison should be disengaged this Evening Mr. Hamilton would be obliged by an opportunity of conversing with him at his lodgings for half an hour. If engaged this Evening he will thank him to say whether tomorrow Evening will suit. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Hamilton.
I thank you My Dear Sir for the line you was so obliging as to leave for me and for the loan of the book accompanying it; in which I have not yet made sufficient progress to judge of its merit. I dont know how it was but I took it for granted that you had left town much earlier than you did; else I should have found an opportunity after your adjournment to converse with you on the subjects...
I thank you My Dear Sir for the line you was so obliging as to leave for me and for the loan of the book accompanying it; in which I have not yet made sufficient progress to judge of its merit. I dont know how it was but I took it for granted—That you had left town much earlier than you did; else I should have found an opportunity after your adjournment to converse with you on the subjects...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours of the 20th. The only part of it which surprises me is what you mention respecting Clinton. I cannot however believe that the plan will succeed. Nor indeed do I think that Clinton would be disposed to exchange his present appointment for that office or to risk his popularity by holding both. At the same time the attempt merits attention and ought not to be...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours of the 20th. The only part of it which surprises me is what you mention respecting Clinton. I cannot however believe that the plan will succeed. Nor indeed do I think that Clinton would be disposed to exchange his present appointment for that office or to risk his popularity by holding both. At the same time the attempt merits attention and ought not to be...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs. Affecly I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover...