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I have received the pleasure of your favour of yesterday’s date. The reasons you assign for the interval of silence on your part are admitted as sufficient; though I regret that the principal one exists—the combination of the tories for a general insurrection. But perhaps on the scale of policy I ought rather to congratulate you on the event: That there are too many tories in your state as...
I this moment received the favour of your letter of the 16th instant. I partly agree and partly disagree with you respecting the deficiencies of your constitution. That there is a want of vigor in the executive, I believe will be found true. To determine the qualifications proper for the chief executive Magistrate requires the deliberate wisdom of a select assembly, and cannot be safely lodged...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 30, 1777. By Washington’s orders Hamilton wrote to Grice, assistant deputy quartermaster general, ordering the removal of all boats in the Delaware from Trenton up to Coryells. Letter not found. ] GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George Washington (Washington, 1931–1944). , VII VIII , 144, note 29. Coryell’s Ferry, located on the New Jersey side of...
By His Excellency’s command, I am to acknowledge the receipt of yours per Mr. Grace. Colo. Biddle has given Mr. Grace an order to make use of the waggons at Hackets Town, for the purpose of transporting the twelve boats you mention. The General expects it will be done with all possible dispatch, as it is absolutely necessary we should have all the boats we can collect at and about Coryel’s...
I received your favour per express, and as the absence of my former respectable correspondents has made a change necessary, I am happy that you have been substituted in their room. Except a body of Militia at and about Pumpton and a few detachments of observation, our whole army is now collected at two points; the main body here, and a division under General Sullivan at Princeton. Though this...
By order of His Excellency, I am to acknowlege receipt of your favour of yesterday. The General is astonished at that extraordinary want of cloathing you mention; as Mr. Mease informed Mr. Tilghman that a full proportion of this article had been retained in Massachusetts for all its troops. It is unaccountable, that they should be ⟨so⟩ unprovided, unless the cloaths destined for them should...
His Excellency has received your favour of this Day. In answer to it he commands me to inform you that though he is exceedingly happy to hear such an animation prevails among the inhabitants, yet he can by no means, consent to put arms in their hands. This article is too much wanted for the Continental army to be spared to the militia; and experience has taught us, that there has been infinite...
His Excellency has examined your Provision report; and finds every part of it very well, except that relating to the placing a quantity at Trenton. This is the most improper place in the world; for if the enemy should move towards Philadelphia the provisions at trentown in the hurry occasioned by such an event would inevitably fall into their hands. You will therefore without loss of time have...
As the enemy appear from different Quarters to be in motion it is necessary that the army be in readiness to march, it is therefore ordered that the tents be immediately struck—the baggage and camp equipage loaded—the horses to the Waggons and all the men at their respective incampments paraded and ready to march at a moments warning. ALS , University of California at Berkeley. Lincoln, who...
His Excellency desires you will not open or distribute the Cloathing stopped at your post, ’till a Deputy Cloathier comes up to take Charge of it, who will be with you without Loss of time. I am Sir   Your most humb servt. Df , or contemporary copy, in writing of Caleb Gibbs, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
By His Excellencys Command, I am to desire you will give orders upon the deputy Clothier General at Peeks-Kill, for the necessary supply of Cloathing &c. for the four companies raising under your direction. It is not however intended, that more shall be drawn than a sufficiency for the number of men actually inlisted. I am Sir   Your most Obedt servant ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library...
His Excellency has received your two last favours to day. In the first you hint the want of a reinforcement; but as the intention of your body is chiefly for observation and skirmishing and not to make any serious stand, it is the less necessary it should be powerful in numbers. It will however depend upon circumstances, how far it will be expedient to reinforce you; and as soon as any thing...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 13, 1777. “… Joshua Austin, belonging to the independent company of the State of Connecticut, … appears to be incapable of military service. He is hereby discharged from the Continental army.…” ADS , Connecticut State Library, Hartford.
The whole army immediately to strike their tents, pack them up, and get themselves in every respect ready for an instant march. The Quarter Master General to have every thing in his department ready. Colonel Biddle will communicate the above order, to the Commissary & Pay Master General & Judge advocate. ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Although George Washington anticipated a...
Yours of the 25th came to hand last night. Since my last addressed to Mr. Morris, the enemy have been trying a second experiment to tempt us to an engagement, on equal terms of ground. Under the supposition of their intending to evacuate the Jerseys immediately, in order to keep up the idea of a persuit, and to be in a posture to take advantage of any critical moment that might present itself...
I wrote you this moment by His Excellency’s order; but he is so anxious you should be acquainted with his apprehensions on the score of the enemy’s leaving Amboy, with some of their stores remaining in it, that fearing a miscarriage of my former letter he desires me to write another to the same effect. The enemy have had their own leisure to go off and carry whatever they thought proper. What...
… have fallen into the enemy’s hands. This event redounds very little to our credit; for if the post was untenable, or required a larger number of troops to defend it than could be spared for the purpose, it ought long ago to have been foreseen, and given up. Instead of that we have kept a large quantity of cannon in it and have been heaping up very valuable magazines of stores and provisions,...
I had the pleasure of writing to you about four Months ago from Philadelphia, since which I have neither had leisure nor opportunity to give you a line, on what is transacting in this part of the world, and in which I know you are deeply interested. I am uncertain even now, whether there may be any mode of conveyance for this letter; but I will do my part, and leave the rest to fortune. I...
I received your favour of the 4th, by express. If I recollect how far my last went, it did not announce the return of the enemy from Westfield to Amboy, nor their evacuation of that place since. After resting and refreshing themselves a night, they decamped the following day and proceeded to Amboy from which place they went to Staten Island as expeditiously as they could; where they still...
Doctor McWorter has represented to His Excellency the case of a certain negro lately taken by a party of militia belonging to Mr. Caleb Wheeler. This fellow, it seems, some time since, went over to the enemy, and is now detained in confinement on that account. I am ordered to desire you to inquire into the circumstances of the affair, and particularly by whom the negro was taken, for on this...
You will be pleased to forward the inclosed to General Putnam with all expedition, as it is of importance they should not be delayed. By His Excellency’s desire, I wrote to you a day or two ago, requesting that a Capt McConnel & a waggon master who had taken a horse from some inhabitants abused and confined them, should be sent to Head Quarters to have an examination in to their conduct. I am...
I received your favour and one from Mr. Morris last night by express. The stroke at Ticonderoga is heavy, unexpected and unaccountable. If the place was untenable why not discovered to be so before the Continent had been put to such an amazing expence, in furnishing it with the means of defence? If it was tenable, what, in the name of common sense could have induced the evacuation? I would...
The intelligence, on which the order given you to join this army was founded, proving not to be as expected, His Excellency desires you to return to your old station and there remain ’till further orders. He thinks it not improbable the enemy may take it into their heads to make some incursion into the Jerseys to plunder and distress the inhabitants, or perhaps even to endeavour to destroy our...
Your favour of the 18th ⟨from Saratoga reached me⟩ yesterday. Your pronouncing Fort Edward among the other forts indefensible surprises me a little, as it is intirely contrary to the representations of several Gentlemen of judgment, who have had an opportunity of seeing and considering its situation, by whom we have been taught to believe, that it would be an excellent post, at least ⟨for⟩...
I have the pleasure of your favour of the 25th. I cannot be induced to think the enemy are so numerous as you apprehend, and would place no dependence on what is said either by deserters or prisoners, further than as it respects their own company, nor even that with regard to prisoners in general who commonly have their cue, as the phrase is, and know very well how to manufacture stories...
His Excellency commands me to acknowlege the receipt of yours of the 27th instant. The circumstance of the fleet appearing off, opposite to Blue Point does not indicate any movement to the Eastward. It was necessary in going out of the Hook, whatever course they might intend to steer, whether to the Southward or Eastward, to stand out in that direction for some time, as they went out with a...
I last Evening had the pleasure of your favour of the 2d. I am with you exceeding anxious for the Safety of your State, though the Numbers of the Enemy have very little part in producing the anxiety; the panic in the army (I am afraid pretty high up) and the want of zeal in the Eastern States are the only alarming Considerations, for tho Burgoine should be weak in numbers as I suppose him, if...
Camp Near German Town [ Pennsylvania ] August 7, 1777. Certifies that “Monsieur Bernard Pally De Couseau, Ensign in the German Batalion, is by his own request permitted to leave said batalion.” ADS , RG 93, Miscellaneous Records, National Archives.
I most sincerely and heartily sympathise with you in the distresses and dangers under which your state is labouring at this critical period. I lament its misfortunes, as they are wounds to the common cause, as they more nearly interest those for whom I feel the warmest regard, and as they are suffered by a state, which I consider, in a great measure, as my political parent. I wish any thing in...
Your two favours both of the 22d came to hand yesterday. His Excellency had been all the day out reconnoitring the country and did not return home ’till late in the evening; this morning he again went out upon the same business, and has desired me to acknowlege the receipt of your letters. The signal advantages gained over the enemy by Generals, Stark and Herkemar at so gloomy and distressing...
Wilmington [ Delaware ] August 29, 1777. Sends extract from General Orders of June 18, 1777, stating that “Timothy Pickering Esquire is appointed Adjutant General in the Armies of the United States of America.” ADS , Pickering Foundation, Salem, Massachusetts. Before his appointment as adjutant general, Timothy Pickering had served as colonel of a Massachusetts militia regiment.
By command of His Excellency, I am to request you will immediately send on Major Blackden & the detachment that came with him to join this army. I am Sir   Your most Obed serv ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The date reads either 28 or 29, for one set of numbers has been written over the other. Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Blackden or Blagden, Second Continental Dragoons.
Agreeable to the intention of the Council I have delivered their inclosed letter to His Excellency who after perusing it has sealed and forwarded it to Mr. Hancock. The relieving Fort Schuyler is a very happy and important event, and will concur with the two happy strokes given by Harkemar and Stark to reverse the face of affairs and turn the scale against Mr Burgoigne. I hope Capt...
paid at Mr James in Cecil Aug 26th for Lodging &c &c £6    Amt. the within  6.6.6 £12.6.6 Wilmington Sept. 2. 1777 Received the above of Capt Gibbs ADS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Gibbs was an aide-de-camp to George Washington and captain and commander of Washington’s Guards. Having embarked from New York on July 23, 1777, with fifteen thousand troops, Sir William Howe...
Inclosed in your letter to Mr Ludowick you will find one from His Excellency confirming your orders. We expected you to call here this morning; but as you have not done it, I send you the letters, that they may be immediately forwarded by express. No time should be lost in the matter as it is a point of the most urgent necessity. I am Sir   Your most Obed serv ALS , Harvard College Library....
If Congress have not yet left Philadelphia, they ought to do it immediately without fail, for the enemy have the means of throwing a party this night into the city. I just now crossed the valleyford, in doing which a party of the enemy came down & fired upon us in the boat by which means I lost my horse. One man was killed and another wounded. The boats were abandon’d & will fall into their...
I did myself the honor to write you a hasty line this Evening giving it as my opinion that the city was no longer a place of safety for you. I write you again lest that should not get to hand. The enemy are on the road to Sweedes ford, the main body about four miles from it. They sent a party this evening to Davesers ferry, which fired upon me and some others in crossing it, killed one man,...
paid at Christiana for family’s breakfast, horses &c.— £6.5  paid on the road from thence to Wilmington for lodging &c— 6.   paid for breakfast the morning we crossed brandywine— 1.12 pd.  1.12 15.9  Received the above from Capt Gibbs ADS , Hamilton Papers George Washington Papers , Library of Congress. Town on creek of same name, which flows into the Delaware near Wilmington. I.e.,...
We have just received your favour of Yesterday, desiring from us a Testimony of your Conduct, so far as it fell under our Observation, the day of the Battle on the Brandywine. As we had not the pleasure of seeing you in the fore part of that Action when the Line at large was Engaged, We are unable from our own Knowledge, to say any thing of your Conduct at that time. But we can chearfully...
I left camp last evening and came to this city to superintend the collection of blankets and cloathing for the army. Mr. Lovel sends to inform me there is an express going off to Congress, and I do myself the honor to communicate a brief state of things, when I left camp. The enemy moved yesterday from where they lay opposite to valley forge &c. higher up the river on their old scheme of...
I am in Philadelphia on some business of great importance to the army; to execute which I stand in need of a party of about 100 men which are not readily to be procured here. If Your Excy. will be pleased to order over such a party under good active officers, you will equally serve the public & oblige.   Yr. Excy’s   Most Obed servt. ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston.
by Virtue of powers from His Excellency General Washington I do hereby Authorise you to require from the inhabitants, contributions of Blankets and Cloathing of every kind and to take whatever materials you know will be useful to the Army that you may find in the Stores keeping an account of the same and giving receipts. ADS , sold by Stan V. Henkels, March 9, 1904, Lot 1150. Text taken from...
In consequence of orders received from His Excellency General Washington, I desire you will press all the horses in this city & neighbourhood in order to be conveyed thence to some place more remote from the present seat of the war, except such as come under the following description: Those which are the property of poor needy persons, whose livelihood depends upon them, and those which belong...
Son Excellence vous desire d’assembler toute la cavalerie le plutot possible prés de ses quartiers, ou vous trouverez de place propre pous les accommoder, ceux qui sont utilement employé excepté. Vous informerez son Excellence dés le moment de votre arrivé. I’l n’y a pas du temps a perdre. J suis   Votre serveteur tres hum ALS , Maine Historical Society, Portland. Count Casimir Pulaski, a...
95General Orders, 3 October 1777 (Hamilton Papers)
[ Worcester Township, Pennsylvania, October 3, 1777.] Describes order of march for attack on Germantown. D , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Although the manuscript is undated it is endorsed by George Washington “Order of March and Battle German Town 4th Oct. 1777.”
I have directed General Varnum to send your regiment and that of Colonel Angel to Red bank, by a rout which has been marked out to him. The command of that detachment will of course devolve upon you; with which you will proceed with all expedition and throw your self into that place. When you arrive there you will immediately communicate your arrival to Col: Smith, commander of the Garrison at...
I am desired by His Excellency, to inform you that, on a second consideration, it has been thought inexpedient to send as many Continental troops to Red-bank, as was at first intended; and that the number, now on their march for that place, will be rather insufficient for the defence of it. He therefore requests you will, in addition to the Continental troops, furnish from a 100 to 150 of your...
His Excellency is persuaded by intelligence from different Quarters that the Enemy are determin’d to endeavour, by a speedy & vigorous effort to carry Fort Mifflin, and for this purpose are preparing a considerable force. Their attempt will probably be sudden & violent as they are hardly in a situation to delay a matter so essential to them as that of removing the River obstructions. It is of...
His Excellency desires me to acknowledge the Receipt of yours of yesterday, and thank you for the intelligence contained in it. He hopes you will soon be able to send him a confirmation with more certain particulars. I am Dr Sir   Your most Obedt ALS , Mrs. Cecily Symington, Cooperstown, New York. Stewart was commissary general of issues from June 18, 1777, to July, 1782.
100Council of War, 29 October 1777 (Hamilton Papers)
Whitpain Township [ Pennsylvania ] October 29, 1777 . Hamilton recorded the minutes of this meeting. D , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.