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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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The State of New York, To Alex. Hamilton, Dr. 1783 July 30 To my allowance as a delegate of Congress from the 25 of November 1782 to this day £496 at 5 dollars per day—248 days both days included. Days of travelling in going and coming, 14 days at ditto   28 524 Credit By an order from Col. Udney Hay on Mr. Comfort Sands 200. Also from Col. Hay part of an order for 200 in favour of Mr. Floyed...
The enclosed was delivered me by Doctr. Schuyler with a request to transmit it to one of the delegates of the state for patronage. He assures me that what he asks has been done in similar cases; particularly for some Hospital surgeons belonging to the State of Pensylvania. If so there will prob⟨ably⟩ be no difficulty in the case. I beg l⟨eave⟩ to recommend it to your attention. Doctor Schuyler...
I received last night your letter of the 8th. instant, accompanied by one from Mr. L’hommedieu and yourself to Mr. Floyd and myself. I shall in consequence write to the Governor on the subject; though if I recollect right, I did in an official letter to him mention all that I can now say though perhaps at greater length—to wit that the resolutions of the senate & Assembly were committed for...
Having always entertained an esteem for you personally I could not without reluctance yield to impressions that might weaken that sentiment, and it is with pain I find myself drawn by circumstances to animadvert upon the late message from the Executive Council to the Assembly of Pensylvania relative to the mutiny in a manner which may seem to impeach the candor of those who were the authors of...
I think I may address the subject of this letter to Your Excellency with more propriety than to any other person, as it is purely of a military nature, as you are best acquainted with my services as an officer, and as you are now engaged in assisting to form the arrangements for the future peace establishment. Your Excellency knows that in March 82, I relinquished all claim to any future...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful, and I have intire confidence that you will do me...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful— and I have entire confidence that you will do me...
By this time I presume My Dear General you have returned to your ancient residence. I had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Greene at New York; and was induced by her to hope you would be prevailed upon to become a fellow citizen of ours. I know you have long had a partiality for our state; but I have been afraid, and have not yet banished my apprehensions, that your new Mistress would detach you...
I have lately received from Messrs. Duane and Lhommedieu an extract of a letter from Your Excellency to the Delegates of the 23d. of August last requesting “a particular detail of the motives which influenced the determination of Congress” respecting the application of the legislature to have their state troops released from Continental pay, for the purpose of garrisoning the frontier posts....
Albany, October 20, 1783. On this date Hamilton signed an oath of allegiance to the State of New York. The oath, signed by six other lawyers, reads as follows: “I do solemnly without any mental reservation or Equivocation whatsoever swear and declare and call God to witness That I renounce and adjure all allegiance to the King of Great Britain; and that I will bear true faith & allegiance to...