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I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captain of Infantry. This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
The time which has elapsed since my letter of the first of August was delivered to you precludes the further expectation of an answer. From this silence, I will draw no inference; nor will I presume to judge of the fitness of silence on such an occasion, on the part of The Chief Magistrate of a Republic, towards a citizen, who without a stain has discharged so many important public trusts. But...
General Wilkinson, who has been some weeks in the City, in consequence of an invitation having for object the readjustment of our Western Military affairs, is about to make a journey to Bra [ i ] ntree to pay his respects to you. On such an occasion, I hope it will not be thought improper that I should address you on the subject of this officer; since what I shall say will accord with what I...
I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captan of Infantry—This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education, he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
Col Toussard, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is desirous of being appointed Inspector of Artillery. He has reason to hope that his wish is favoured by the Secretary at War—and seems to think that the intimation of my opinion may be useful to him. On the supposition that it accords with the views of the head of the War Department, I have no hesitation to add my...
Not having recd. an acknowledgemt. of my letter to you of the 8th. inst. I send you a copy— You will please to direct Lt. Gibson of the Corps of Artillerists to repair to Fort Mifflin and take the orders of the Commanding Officer there till he shall be directed to join his Company. You will likewise detach the Artificers of Capt. Elliott’s Company to the same place With great consideration I...
New York, June 8, 1799. “It is concurred to be expedient for some time to come to keep a body of troops in and near that district of Country in which the late insurrection existed. In this Service it is intended for the present to continue the troops now at Reading.… General McPherson recommended the occupying of three stations Reading, Allentown , & Easton . If the Corps of troops was more...
You will be pleased to inquire of un Capt. Shoemaker and Lieut. Boote whether they have any unexpended supply of money and cloathing for continuing the recruiting service; and report to me accordingly— With great consideration &c ( LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
New York, August 23, 1799. “… I am not anxious that any part of your force should be stationed at Easton if you think it of importance to keep the whole united. It would however be a strong motive to the stationing of a small party at Easton if the recruiting service could be benefited by the measure. It is not convenient at present to reinforce your detachment, but as I am not apprehensive of...
The Secretary of war mentions to me that he has been informed by several respectable Gentlemen of Baltimore that there is enlisted with Lieut. Boote a person by the name of John Forysth of a very weak and feeble constitution—That the family of this person are extremely distressed on at his situation, and propose the furnishing offer to furnish an able substitute, or to advance a reasonable sum...