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The peculiar situation of American affairs renders it necessary to adopt every measure that will engage people in the service. The danger and hardships that those are subject to who engage in the service, more than those who do not, is obvious to every body which has the least Acquaintance with service, tis that which makes it so difficult to recruit. The large force that is coming against...
I have just receivd your favor of the 26th of May in answer to mine of the 24th. You must not expect me to be a very exact correspondent, my circumstances will not always admit of it. When I have opportunity I will write you with freedom if any information I can give you should be of service I shall be amply paid. I know your time is too precious to be spent in Answering Letters; but a line...
I received your Letter of the 22d. of June, if it was necessary for you to Apologise for not writing sooner it is necessary also for me. But as the express conditions of my corresponding with you was to write when I had time and leave you to answer at your leisure, I think an Apology is unnecessary on either side. But I can Assure you, as you did me, that it is not for want of respect that...
It is a long time since I wrote to you, or you to me, who stands in debt upon the schore of Letters I cannot tell therefore I shall begin anew if you have time and inclination you will give it an answer if not—I shall consider it as the Ladies do their Visits after Marriage, if theres no return the acquaintance drops. I believe you are pretty well convinced of the truth of the observation I...
I have neither seen nor heard of any Resolution of Congress approving or disproving of the Laboratory being fixed at Springfield. If the Congress approves thereof it will be necessary for them to say so there being now an Order for it’s being fixed at Brookfield and the Council of the Massachusets State commissioned to provide the materials for the erection of the necessary Buildings at that...
The Enemy made an attempt to surprise General Lincoln. This morning they advanced by three divisions. One crossed the Rarotan about a mile above Head Quarters—the second division came up in front of the Town—the third to the left of the Town and crossed the River cald Boundbrook. Besides these three divisions there was a Corps of de reservs commanded by General Mathews. The Padroles and Guards...
Your favor of April 22d. came to hand a few days since. General Lincoln is deservedly acquited from any blame. It is as you observe impossible to guard against the intrigues of the Tories and the Negligence of the Militia. However I hope with you that few such surprises will take place. I most sincerely lament the great inattention and indifference that appears among the People in general...
I receiv’d a letter from you some days since. I have it not with me, and therefore cannot be very particular in the Answer. I re­ member you lament the general corruption of manners, and the increase of vicious habits that prevail in the Army; It is a serious truth, and much to be lamented; I know of nothing that a people can receive in exchange, for the loss of their Morals that is an...
Our correspondence has been long broken off. I had the honor of a line from you by the Count de Noel; but I was at a loss to tell whether I was indebted to you or to him for it. However in that letter you express a wish to renew our correspondence. I should have readily complied with your desire, but as the correspondence had droped from your disinclination and not mine, and as my situation at...
In obedience to a vote of the Standing Committee of the Washington Society I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed Card, and to request that you will honor the Society with your presence on the ensuing Anniversary of American Independence. With respect, / your most obt Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey ] February 23, 1779 . States that the work on “batteaux” will be continued in case it is decided to revive expedition against Canada. LS , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
It is impossible for me to tell the number of Expresses that may be necessary to do the public business, that depending so much upon contingencies, and the manner of conducting it. We have heretofore kept about Thirty in pay with the Army; and the duty has been so hard, and the encouragement so small, that the greater part have given me warning, to provide others in their place. If the...
I thank you kindly for your candid reply. I confess my self unable to write a milder letter upon this subject than this I send you. My feelings are so irritated that the moment I begin to write my passions take the lead in the Sentiment and mingle in such a manner as you see by my composition. I strove as much as ever Mortal did to keep down my resentment; but I found it impossible and there...
General du Portail being on his way to the Northward gives me an opportunity to write you; which I should have done before, had not my letters to his Excellency contained as full information of the state of things, as I was able to give from the little time I had been in the department. When I was appointed to this command I expected to meet with many new and singular difficulties; but they...
[ New York ] August 16, 1785 . On this date Hamilton witnessed a power of attorney from Greene to Wadsworth. DS , signed by Nathanael Greene and witnessed by H and Dirck Ten Broeck. Connecticut State Library, Hartford.
Misfortunes are more or less painful, as they have been brought upon us by folly, extravagance, or imposed by public necessity. Those of the latter kind may be distressing, but cannot be dishonorable. I have long struggled with difficulties, in which I was involved, while in command to the southward, and which I should have laid before Congress, at an earlier period, but from a hope, that I...
“I am taking measures to obtain clothing for the troops. We have on hand but a small part of our winter clothing, and after what we shall be obliged to issue to those troops going northwardly, we shall have but a small pittance left. I imagine, our purchases will amount to not less than forty thousand dollars, for which I shall draw bills on the Financier; and, as I provide the clothing, at...
“You will see by some of my former letters, that, in consequence of your orders, I had taken measures, to provide such articles of clothing, as were necessary to complete the troops with their winter clothing. Messrs. Banks and Company have furnished most of the articles we shall want, and will provide the rest. Mr. Hamilton, the clothier, had instructions to contract with such as would supply...
“Lieutenant Colonel Carrington has closed a contract with Mr. Banks for the subsistence of the army, at something [less] than eleven pence sterling. It is high, but it could not be had lower. There was not an offer made but by Mr. Banks, although I wrote to all the principal men in the country. People have not that spirit for engaging in business, here, as with us. “I shall get the troops...
An idle surmise of Mr. Banks, and an improper curiosity of General Scott in the State of Virginia, may give an unjust complexion to the late transaction respecting the measures taken to obtain clothing, as the Governor of Virginia writes, that it was considered a mere speculation for private emolument. For fear, such rumors should spread to my disadvantage, I take the liberty to enclose you a...
It having been suggested from an interpretation of my letter of October 1782, to Mr. James Hunter, that the honorable Major-General Greene was interested, or intimated a desire of holding a commercial connection with me in Charleston; I do, therefore, as well for the sake of removing such an idea, as to avert from myself any mischief, that a heedless surmise, expressed in a confidential letter...
Robert Morris, Esquire, Financier for the United States, has in his advertisements for receiving proposals for contracts for supplying the army with rations, directed them to be made to me, in the States of North and South Carolina and Georgia; but in his letter of the 17th of October, 1782, he desires me to commit the business to your care and management, should I find it more convenient for...
The comfortable condition, in which you have put the army, from the large supply of blankets and clothing furnished it, claims my particular acknowledgments; for, although I expect the public will make you a reasonable compensation, yet, as you were the only person, who had the will and the means to serve us, our obligation is equally great. I am happy to find, that most, if not all our...
Your letter of the 18th of September, by Mr. Hayward, with the Bills enclosed, I forgot to acknowledge in my last. He promises me the money very soon; Mr. Drayton also promises to pay me very shortly. The clothier’s, quarter master’s and medical departments, together with the bills drawn for two months pay for the officers, give me no small uneasiness, for fear the amount should exceed your...
This moment reported me from the Whitehouse Guard that a deserter had made his escape into Bunker Hill—Two Centries fird at him but he made his escape I believe unhurt—As it is uncertain who it is or what he is I have thought proper to alter the Parole & Countersign for these Guards which if your Excellency Approves youl please to signify it at the return of the Sergeant—If this deserter has...
In Obedience to Your Excellency’s Orders, we have considered the Matters referred to Us, & beg leave to recommend the following Signals to be given from Roxbury, in Case of any Movement of The Enemy to Distress our People at Dorchester Hill: Signal in Case the Enemy begin to Embarque, a Flagg on Roxbury meeting House; If they Actually Land at Dorchester Two Flaggs, One, over the Other; In case...
Prospect Hill, 21 February 1776 . Mr Davids has been chosen chaplain for Varnum’s and Bond’s regiments, and Mr Noble chosen chaplain for Hitchcock’s and Little’s regiments. ALS , DLC:GW . Ebenezer David (c.1752–1778), who was ordained by the Sabbatarian Church of Newport on 31 May 1775, began serving as a chaplain in January 1776. It is said that he returned his commission to GW and acted as a...
2 March 1776 . “I visited the . . . Guards in the left and Center Division and . . . found all the Guards in Good Order—Capt. Lewis reported Eight oClock this Morning Five sail of Ships were Coming into Boston. . . . N.B. Joel Hewit of Col. Sargeants Regiment & Francis Offy of Col. Greytons Regt confined in the Main Guard at Cambridge for Mutiny & Disobedience of Orders.” ADS , DNA : RG 93,...
[8 March 1776] . “I visited the Guards and gave such Orders as appear’d to be necessary found them in good Order. The Enemy on Bunkers Hill were very busy last Night and this Morning they were carrying Spunges Ladles &C. from the Hill to the Ferry—By the Noise last Night it was suggested they were moveing their heavy Cannon off the Hill and replacing them with Field Pieces.” ADS , DNA : RG 93,...
Major Nathaniel Cudworth lately discharged from Colo. Whitcombs Regiment has arrived to Join Colo. Bonds, he is agreeable to the Field Officers and satisfactory to the Captains & Subs. The Major is a good prudent Officer and left the former Regiment only because there was not proper order and Decipline maintain’d in it [.] I esteem him worthy the appointment; and if your Excellencys Sentiments...