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Our correspondence has been long broken off. I had the honor of a line from you by the Count de Noel; but I was at a loss to tell whether I was indebted to you or to him for it. However in that letter you express a wish to renew our correspondence. I should have readily complied with your desire, but as the correspondence had droped from your disinclination and not mine, and as my situation at...
In obedience to a vote of the Standing Committee of the Washington Society I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed Card, and to request that you will honor the Society with your presence on the ensuing Anniversary of American Independence. With respect, / your most obt Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
Your favor of April 22d. came to hand a few days since. General Lincoln is deservedly acquited from any blame. It is as you observe impossible to guard against the intrigues of the Tories and the Negligence of the Militia. However I hope with you that few such surprises will take place. I most sincerely lament the great inattention and indifference that appears among the People in general...
I received your Letter of the 22d. of June, if it was necessary for you to Apologise for not writing sooner it is necessary also for me. But as the express conditions of my corresponding with you was to write when I had time and leave you to answer at your leisure, I think an Apology is unnecessary on either side. But I can Assure you, as you did me, that it is not for want of respect that...
The peculiar situation of American affairs renders it necessary to adopt every measure that will engage people in the service. The danger and hardships that those are subject to who engage in the service, more than those who do not, is obvious to every body which has the least Acquaintance with service, tis that which makes it so difficult to recruit. The large force that is coming against...
The Enemy made an attempt to surprise General Lincoln. This morning they advanced by three divisions. One crossed the Rarotan about a mile above Head Quarters—the second division came up in front of the Town—the third to the left of the Town and crossed the River cald Boundbrook. Besides these three divisions there was a Corps of de reservs commanded by General Mathews. The Padroles and Guards...
I receiv’d a letter from you some days since. I have it not with me, and therefore cannot be very particular in the Answer. I re­ member you lament the general corruption of manners, and the increase of vicious habits that prevail in the Army; It is a serious truth, and much to be lamented; I know of nothing that a people can receive in exchange, for the loss of their Morals that is an...
I have neither seen nor heard of any Resolution of Congress approving or disproving of the Laboratory being fixed at Springfield. If the Congress approves thereof it will be necessary for them to say so there being now an Order for it’s being fixed at Brookfield and the Council of the Massachusets State commissioned to provide the materials for the erection of the necessary Buildings at that...
I have just receivd your favor of the 26th of May in answer to mine of the 24th. You must not expect me to be a very exact correspondent, my circumstances will not always admit of it. When I have opportunity I will write you with freedom if any information I can give you should be of service I shall be amply paid. I know your time is too precious to be spent in Answering Letters; but a line...
It is a long time since I wrote to you, or you to me, who stands in debt upon the schore of Letters I cannot tell therefore I shall begin anew if you have time and inclination you will give it an answer if not—I shall consider it as the Ladies do their Visits after Marriage, if theres no return the acquaintance drops. I believe you are pretty well convinced of the truth of the observation I...
The comfortable condition, in which you have put the army, from the large supply of blankets and clothing furnished it, claims my particular acknowledgments; for, although I expect the public will make you a reasonable compensation, yet, as you were the only person, who had the will and the means to serve us, our obligation is equally great. I am happy to find, that most, if not all our...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey ] February 23, 1779 . States that the work on “batteaux” will be continued in case it is decided to revive expedition against Canada. LS , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
I thank you kindly for your candid reply. I confess my self unable to write a milder letter upon this subject than this I send you. My feelings are so irritated that the moment I begin to write my passions take the lead in the Sentiment and mingle in such a manner as you see by my composition. I strove as much as ever Mortal did to keep down my resentment; but I found it impossible and there...
It is impossible for me to tell the number of Expresses that may be necessary to do the public business, that depending so much upon contingencies, and the manner of conducting it. We have heretofore kept about Thirty in pay with the Army; and the duty has been so hard, and the encouragement so small, that the greater part have given me warning, to provide others in their place. If the...
General du Portail being on his way to the Northward gives me an opportunity to write you; which I should have done before, had not my letters to his Excellency contained as full information of the state of things, as I was able to give from the little time I had been in the department. When I was appointed to this command I expected to meet with many new and singular difficulties; but they...
A late law has been passed by the legislature of the state of New Jersey, for the express purpose of taxing the Assistant and Deputy Quarter Masters General, which I am afraid will be productive of the most disagreeable consequences— This law appears so arbitrary and unprecedented upon any free principles of taxation, that I am surprized it ever had the sanction of a deliberative body— Such a...
The enclosed is a letter from Col. Chace D.Q.M.G. at Boston. The representation it contains, and the consequences that will follow, point out the necessity of some mode being adopted for the security of the Barracks— For the present, I have directed Col. Chace to enter into contract with the proprietors of the soil on which the Barracks stand, to make them a reasonable compensation for the use...
His Excellency General Washington, has shewn me a Letter of General Sullivan’s to Congress, wherein he exclaims against the force and preparations for the Expedition he is sent upon; particularly against the preparation in the Quarter Master’s Department. It was the 2 nd of March before His Excellency, General Washington determined upon the plan of operation. This was owing to the difficulty...
It cannot be unknown to Congress that in the different Departments of the Army there are many Persons employed in the Character of Officers who have no other Commission than a kind of Warrant or Appointment from the Head of the Department in which they serve. They consequently have no Rank in the Army, but are left on the Footing of private Soldiers as to Arrests, and Modes of Trial. Amongst...
In the different Movements of the Army it frequently happens that the Inhabitants of the Country unavoidably suffer damages of various kinds for which Justice seems to demand that they should receive a Compensation from the Publick. There are two ways in which these damages usually happen one of which is the taking; of such Articles on sudden Emergencies as the Army may stand in need of, which...
Since I wrote your Excellency last, I have taken an entire new position with the Army. One part is with me on this river about 80 Miles from Charlotte, and the other is with Genl. Morgan on Broad river, on the West side of the Catawba about 60 Miles from Charlotte. The State of the provisions as well as many other reasons rendered this measure necessary. Lord Cornwallis continues in the...
Since I wrote your Excellency in answer to the resolutions of your Assembly relative to the conduct of the Cavalry Officers, and the measures pointed out to supply this Army in future with Horses, I have been considering more fully the tendency and consequences that would attend it. It is to be lamented that Officers will not exercise more discretion and prudence when entrusted with the...
I arrived at this place on the 2d instant, to which place General Gates had advanced with the army some days before I overtook him. I find the troops under his command in a wretched condition, destitute of anything necessary either to the comfort or convenience of soldiers. It is impossible that men can render any service, if they are ever so well disposed, whilst they are starving with cold...
I congratulate you on the success of the detachment under Genl. Morgan. They were attacked by 1100 British troops under Lt. Col. Tarlton on the 17th. Inst. whom they defeated entirely and with very little loss. I must beg you will permit me to refer you to Major Genl. The Baron de Steuben for the particulars. I have appointed Major Hyrne of the S. Carolina line Deputy Commissary General of...
I have been honord with your Excellencys letter of April the 5th and with the enclosures respecting the misconduct of Lt. Rudder. I consider it a public misfortune that such hot headed Youth, have it in their power to injure the public by such imprudent conduct. Let him and every other Officer who misbehaves be subject to such punnishment as they merit. You may depend upon it that no Officer...
This letter will be handed you by my friend Mr. John McQueen whose principal errand to Paris is to form a contract for live oak on which I wrote you some time since. I beg leave to recommend him to your good offices on the business which he comes but I hope the matter may be so managed that our propositions may not interfere with each other. Mr. McQueen can give you full history of the...
The time of service of the Militia under General Lawson and General Stevens is expird and they are dischargd, having honorably performed their duty agreeable to contract. It was unfortunate that their term of service expird at the time it did; but we could ask no more of the men than they were bound to perform nor would it answer any purpose as they cannot be prevaild on to continue in a...
This will be handed your Excellency by Capt. Walton who is ordered to Virginia to recruit for the first Regiment of Light Dragoons. Cavalry is of great importance to the service in this department and I must beg your Excellency to give every aid in your power to fill the Regiment as soon as possible and that immediate measures may be taken for compleating the compliment of horse required of...
I did myself the honor to address your Excellency on the 28th of February. We were soon obliged to change our possition after the departure of my letter by a sudden Manæuvre of the Enemy towards this place. A small skirmish happened in consequence of it near Whitesyls Mill; and as they were chiefly rifle-men who engaged them in it, I make no doubt but the Enemy suffered considerably, tho’ our...
Requisitions made to the State of Virginia by Genl. Greene for the Establishment and Supplying the Southern Army. 1. That the State immediately furnish its quota of Troops agreable to the new Establishment, and that the Men be supplied with cloathing Blankets, Arms, and every Accoutrement necessary for equipping them for a Winters Campaign, and that Lawsons Corps, and Stephens’s Brigade of...