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Should you find in this ms a deal of the caput mortuum don’t wonder, for the weather is & has been very hot for several days. The last wednesday the house opposite to the old brick was so violently hot, that in their zeal against the absentees they broke the good frame of government you had a hand in erecting. The brains were for providing that persons taken up as such, should have a trial by...
Yours by your son was a very agreeable letter. I rec d it last wednesday while at the President’s, where I had the pleasure of viewing your living picture. You have confirmed me in my suspicion, that tho’ there were many pictures abroad there was little likeness. I shall do my best, & it may be well for one who is not a writer of the first talents, nor been employed thirty years in making my...
Your favour of April the 8th tho’ frankt was not received till the 22d of May. Tis mortifying to think that such a horrid corruption hath spread itself so rapidly thro’ the American States; and that in the first year of our existence we should have adopted so many of the Old England vices. People had a better opinion of themselves than was meet: but the time of temptation hath laid open their...
In answer to yours of July 2 d , sent You, Sep t 19, under cover to Mess rs D e Neufville’s by a vessel,—Buffington Master—bound from Salem to France, a very long letter, in which I wrote freely: afterwards I thought, that should French curiosity peep into it, you might possibly fail of receiving it. I keep no copies, & therefore cannot transmit a duplicate. But I told You that I neither knew...
You have very fairly & fully discharged your epistolary account of the preceeding year; which is an encouragement for me to begin anew. There is both pleasure & profit in corresponding with You; & notwithstanding some desponding expressions, I trust your strength & spirits will not be exhausted, till the business is completed. Finesse & subtilty are ministerial qualifications; & the only...
We are just returned from visiting your good Lady at Braintree, where I had a complaint exhibited against me for not writing to you, which I mean to answer totidem verbis. But before I proceed further must mention, in brief, that news which will be the most important and agreeable of all you will meet with in the letter, viz, that Mrs. Adams and children are well and as chearful as can be...
I begin upon a half sheet, as a quarter may possibly not hold what I have to write, but should I comprehend the whole within that compass, shall dock your allowance, the times demanding the utmost frugality as well as courage. Pray how many more burnings of towns are we to be abused with by the British Barbarians, ere the long suffering of the Congress is concluded, and every manly exertion of...
The beginning of March I forwarded to You and friend Dana a joint letter, which I hope if received will be answered by one or other of you. The people, you will have heard before this can get to hand, have agreed upon a form of government, not so good as the Report of the Committee, but better than I expected. We begin to think of the ensuing elections. It is thought that Mr. Bowdoin or Mr....
This day 7-night I transmitted under cover to Mr. Hancock a number of anniversary sermons, printed at the request of the General Court, some of which were directed to those members of the Congress whose names I was acquainted with, others I requested might be directed, my design being to present one to each; yours I hope will be duely received. The particular occasion of my writing is not the...
I had not abandoned the idea of renewing our correspondence; but should probably have delayed executing it, had not my indignation been roused, at the implied insult offered to the good sense of the federal government in the newspaper (& as supposed ministerial) paragraph—“Mr Hammond the new Consul General to the United States of America & late secretary to the embassy at Madrid, will set off...
Last evening I heard that a vessel was arrived from Amsterdam. Was up early and went to Boston in the morning after letters, could meet with none, and returned home to dinner. Between four and five Deacon Mason called and brought me one from . My good old Friend, who I began to fear from his long silence, had nearly forgotten me, through the multitude of more capital European figures...
I hope this will find you at Westminster. I congratulate You upon your late appointment; it was what I wished for, as what I thought would be agreeable to you, & for the good of our country. The treaty of commerce may be too far settled to admit of alteration: but if your correspondents have not urged you in the most pressing manner, to exert every nerve to obtain an importation of our whale...
Your two letters of Ap r 27 th & June 26 th were duly received. The first at the President’s, Rich d Henry Lee Esq r , where I had the pleasure of dining with your son on the 10 th of Aug t , being at New York on my last tour for collecting historical materials. I have not seen him, since he reacht this state; but have heard of his welfare. I am busily employed in the way you mention; & am...
O! human nature, what are thou! When one of the most noted Republicans cannot be consistent; nor be placed on an eminence without having his head affected. My former letter was designed for Messrs. Adams and Dana, whom I humourously considered as in partnership: but I now find that they are not partners —that they carry on business separately and that I must be at the expence of corresponding...
I expected some how or other to have had the happiness of falling into your company when you was last in this State, but was disappointed. I have had the pleasure of hearing that you and your fellow traveller had joined the Congress, and further of the Congress’s having got back to Philadelphia, where I hope they will be suffered to remain in peace and quietness. All things considered, and I...
From what D r Holten writes me in his of the 16 th ult I suspect You will be upon your passage home: however there is a chance of the contrary, therefore venture sending by the present conveyance from Providence to London. You are to have other letters from Braintree &c &c by the same channel; & yet this possibly may be first rec d , for which reason I mention your family & friends being well;...
It is almost too late to congratulate you upon our regaining Boston; but I may give you joy of our not having as yet relost it. We ought by this time to have had the harbour fortified so strongly, that a fleet could not have ventured in to have insulted the town, without paying dear for it: but there has been strange not-doings. You will ask me, who is to blame? Should I answer without...
You are so united by commission, in mind views and principles, that there is no writing to the one without the other; for which reason I address you jointly . I rejoiced when I heard that you were safely landed upon the Terra Firma of Europe; and hope that you have had a secure journey over the Pyrenean mountains, which I suppose to be as high as any you ever crossed in America, tho’ not so...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have no great inclination to write: but think it of importance that you should know the state of our affairs, whether promising or otherwise; and this conveyance may possibly bring you the earliest intelligence. Had the enemy a design of pushing thro the Jerseys to Philadelphia, they have been disappointed; and have been obliged to return from Brunswick...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I trouble you afresh with a packet designed for our friend Dr. Price. Be pleased to peruse the letter and papers ere you forward them to him. I wished to put both parties out of conceit with Mr. Hutchinson, which I think will be effected by what is in Edes’s papers, and will be confirmed in two or three subsequent ones. Such a man ought to have no...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This may probably convey to you a painful article of intelligence, viz, the death of that great man Dr Winthrop, who expired on the 3d instant, & is to be buried on the saturday. The College, the State & the Public have sustained a great loss in his death; but the Orderings of Heaven are all right; & it is appointed unto man to die, no less than to be born....
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania I must first of all congratulate and thank you, for and upon the treaties. We have not had them yet from Congress, but have learnt their contents in general, and approve of them. As a native of GB I could have wished that my countrymen had been wise in time, and had known in their day the things that made for their peace and happiness; but heaven means...
ALS : British Library Your duplicate of May 1st has been recd. Am obliged to you for sending the letter to London by a safe hand, and for your kind offer with respect to any future packits. Have taken the allowed liberty of accompanying this with a few sermons. Would have Mr. Sowden’s wait till an opportunity may offer of sending it on without any great expence, or he may think that the sermon...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wrote you lately by the way of Holland, and sent to the care of Mr. Sowden three anniversary sermons designed for Your Self, Mr. Deane and Mr. Lee. Hope you will receive them, but for fear lest it should be otherwise have sent three more on the same service. Pray you to forward Mr. Parker and Mr. Field’s letters by the first post to London; and Mr....
ALS : American Philosophical Society I must pray you, amidst the multiplicity of important business that is continually crowding in upon you, to pay an attention to the enclosed (of consequence to Mr Parker) so far as to forward it by a speedy & safe conveyance. It relates entirely to his ship. Mr Deane has been imprudently making a bustle, & spreading uneasiness. His publication in the...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania After having finished the enclosed I alterd my design, and concluded upon sending it under cover to you, with request that you would forward it to Great Britain by a safe conveyance: if by the post via Holland, it may be best to put it under cover directed by an unknown hand, as the ministerial harpies at the London post office may have acquainted...
Tho from the expressions & innuendos in yours of the 5th instant which I received from Col Henly the last tuesday, I cannot apprehend myself treated with due respect, yet I shall not be thereby drove either to reply with asperity, or to quit my own plan of conduct. Said one of the greatest soldiers of the age in which he lived, “The business of a general is not to fight but to overcome.” When...
In my last of Sepr. 23. I mentioned my having sent to my informer; have received an answer from him wherein he writes “As to the subject of your letter (for which I have now an opportunity to return my thanks) what was said was very confidential, & influenced by nothing but an anxious regard & attachment to our public cause. To affect the character of any one from a malignant principle is...
Upon my return home from a visit on the monday evening I received yours without a date. However common the principle may be, on which you urge me. to an immediate direct & explicit answer , as tho’ the least hesitation or reserve might give room for conjectures, which it can be neither your wish nor mine to excite —it is certainly a false one. In many cases a gentleman may receive information...
In a late letter to the Marquis de La Fayette I mentioned my design of writing soon to your Excellency. The reason of my having been so long silent was, that I might be able to acquaint you, that the second volume of the History was printed, which I can at length do. You was pleased generously to offer me your friendly assistance for the procuring a similar consideration for an early copy of...