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In Obedience to the above Order of Congress, this Committee have enquired into the Premises, and, upon the best Information obtained, find, that the Commanders of the New England Army about the 14th. ultimo received Advice that Genl. Gage had issued Orders for a Party of Troops under his Command, to post themselves on Bunkers Hill, a Promontory just at the Entrance of the Peninsula of...
I had proposed writing by the present opportunity, before I received your letter of Jany the 1st on tuesday last. Return you my most sincere thanks for your good wishes. The second volume will be printed off I expect by the end of the week after next. The first begins with the settlement of the several colonies, & comes down to & takes in the Lexington engagement. The second finishes with the...
Should you find in this ms a deal of the caput mortuum don’t wonder, for the weather is & has been very hot for several days. The last wednesday the house opposite to the old brick was so violently hot, that in their zeal against the absentees they broke the good frame of government you had a hand in erecting. The brains were for providing that persons taken up as such, should have a trial by...
Yours by your son was a very agreeable letter. I rec d it last wednesday while at the President’s, where I had the pleasure of viewing your living picture. You have confirmed me in my suspicion, that tho’ there were many pictures abroad there was little likeness. I shall do my best, & it may be well for one who is not a writer of the first talents, nor been employed thirty years in making my...
Your obliging letter of the 3d instant afforded me peculiar pleasure, & more especially the close of the postscript, as it furnished me with authority for the removal of prejudices, wherever I found any had been produced against your Excellency, by the idle & foolish expressions of individuals. I am not insensible of the delicate situation you have been in, between the Congress & the Army; &...
Judging there is an advantage from knowing the particular tempers of those, with whom we have to transcrit business of the first consequence, I have taken up my pen to acquaint your Excellency with the following matters. I had an intimate friend, who was settled, as a minister, with an English Presbyterian church in Rotterdam; & who was acquainted with a teaching tutor of a prince of Wales,...
In a late letter to the Marquis de La Fayette I mentioned my design of writing soon to your Excellency. The reason of my having been so long silent was, that I might be able to acquaint you, that the second volume of the History was printed, which I can at length do. You was pleased generously to offer me your friendly assistance for the procuring a similar consideration for an early copy of...
When I wrote on the 8th of Feby last, I had no thought of addressing You so soon after. But the subject matter of my writing is of such importance, in my apprehension, that I could not decline doing it—& of that nature, that I choose not to submit it to the inspection of any but yourself, in whom I can confide for secrecy, in regard both to the writer & letter. I have lately learnt that some...
Your favour of April the 8th tho’ frankt was not received till the 22d of May. Tis mortifying to think that such a horrid corruption hath spread itself so rapidly thro’ the American States; and that in the first year of our existence we should have adopted so many of the Old England vices. People had a better opinion of themselves than was meet: but the time of temptation hath laid open their...
In answer to yours of July 2 d , sent You, Sep t 19, under cover to Mess rs D e Neufville’s by a vessel,—Buffington Master—bound from Salem to France, a very long letter, in which I wrote freely: afterwards I thought, that should French curiosity peep into it, you might possibly fail of receiving it. I keep no copies, & therefore cannot transmit a duplicate. But I told You that I neither knew...
Though I have not had the pleasure of an answer, owing to the multiplicity of your engagements, yet by a few lines from New York I have learnt that You was so obliging as to comply with my request. We have now attained to a certainty of peace, upon which You have my most hearty congratulations. Your name will be deservedly written with honor & respect in every history of America. May it be...
Your obliging favours of the 8th inst. were recd on the Saturday. From them I infer not only the continuance of your friendly assistance, but that the papers are regularly received; as yet I have not missed sending, tho’ the post has at times been delayed thro’ the snows: The face of the earth is still covered with them, in these parts, a few trifling spots excepted; & should a thaw come on...
You have very fairly & fully discharged your epistolary account of the preceeding year; which is an encouragement for me to begin anew. There is both pleasure & profit in corresponding with You; & notwithstanding some desponding expressions, I trust your strength & spirits will not be exhausted, till the business is completed. Finesse & subtilty are ministerial qualifications; & the only...
Having received, by the Alliance the last week, a letter from Holland & another from Mr John Adams; I have thought it would be proper to communicate the same to your Excellency wherein they referred to public matters. That from Holland is dated March 27. & says—"if Mr Burke’s oeconmical plan takes place it will long support the present war. I believe the French are half afraid to trust you,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have no great inclination to write: but think it of importance that you should know the state of our affairs, whether promising or otherwise; and this conveyance may possibly bring you the earliest intelligence. Had the enemy a design of pushing thro the Jerseys to Philadelphia, they have been disappointed; and have been obliged to return from Brunswick...
I have enjoyed peculiar pleasure in looking over Fenno’s Gazettes from last Sepr to June 14th 1797: for I have noticed how respectfully & cordially the several States, in their legislative bodies, cities, towns, societies, & united citizens of different denominations, have acknowledged the benefit of your presidency, during the eight years you was at the head of the American Government: & have...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I trouble you afresh with a packet designed for our friend Dr. Price. Be pleased to peruse the letter and papers ere you forward them to him. I wished to put both parties out of conceit with Mr. Hutchinson, which I think will be effected by what is in Edes’s papers, and will be confirmed in two or three subsequent ones. Such a man ought to have no...
I send under cover to Mr Hazard, that so it should not be known at the Coffee house, that I correspond with your Excellency; & pray you not only to have any direction to me written in some other hand than your own, but the letter sealed with the seal of another. When you write again, introduce the Key in some sentence when it may appear natural, with a stroke underneath it. The reason of the...
It is with concern I learn, that the old leaven, which brought on the late American troubles, still exists in the present ministry; & that so many falsehoods are propagated to keep up an unfriendly disposition toward the United States, & no more pains taken to contradict them. Among other reports it is said, that the settlement at Kentucky is made up wholly of the scum & refuse of the...
I cannot omit writing by the present safe conveyance, tho’ I have nothing in particular to communicate. Genl Lincoln will give your Excellency a fuller account of all matters of consequence in this quarter, than what I can do. I was over the other day at Col. Quincy’s. He is breaking fast; but the powers of his mind remain strong. I wish he may live to see & enjoy a happy peace; but I much...
When last in town for a few days, I received your very obliging letter ; and, notwithstanding my numerous engagements, should have given an immediate answer, had I not attended to some circumstances which rendered it unnecessary, upon observing that during the summer the readers are in the country, and being in no such forwardness as to admit of my going directly to the press, saw that I might...
Letter not found: from William Gordon, 7 Nov. 1785. GW wrote Gordon on 6 Dec. : “I come now, my good Doctor, to acknowledge . . . the receipt of your obliging favor of the 7th ulto.”
I write, to testify the continuance of my affection; & to express my hopes, that before the receipt of this You will happily have entered into the 62d year of your age. I doubt not your having been re-elected to the Presidentship, & I most sincerely wish you may fill it the next four years with equal reputation, ease, & success: & if you are assisted with the joint abilities of the same...
Your ardent, persevering, & disinterested patriotism, from the commencement of the American difficulties; & through the various changes that have occurred, from your being chosen Augt 5. 1774 one of the Virginia delegates down to the present day; assure me, that you will approve of my good intentions to promote & perpetuate the welfare of the United States, though you should think me mistaken...
I was in hopes, after reading Genl Carleton’s letter & other publications, that I should have had the opportunity of congratulating you, upon the certain prospects of a speedy & honorable peace; but at present they are uncertain. However I cannot but think, that if G. Britain gets no considerable naval advantage over our friends & allies, before winter sets in, they will seriously apply...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This may probably convey to you a painful article of intelligence, viz, the death of that great man Dr Winthrop, who expired on the 3d instant, & is to be buried on the saturday. The College, the State & the Public have sustained a great loss in his death; but the Orderings of Heaven are all right; & it is appointed unto man to die, no less than to be born....
I just catch a few minutes before the post goes off to acquaint you that Lord Chatham is dead—that no troops whatsoever are coming either from G.B. or Ireland—that tho’ an English fleet of 1–90 guns 9–74 & 1–64 may be sailed from St Helens, a powerful provision has been made for counteracting them when they are upon the American coast; their opposers may possibly be at the Rendezvous before...
Your friendly letter of 15th Ocr last was highly acceptable, but before I enter upon a particular answer I mean to transcribe one of our friend Monsr La Fayette’s dated two days before. Upon hearing He was safe in the neighbourhood of Hamburgh I wrote to him on the 9th of Novr to which he answered from Lehmkhul near Ploin, as follows “My dear Sir With heart-felt satisfaction I have received...
The last week I had the pleasure of seeing Genl Lincoln, from whom I learnt, that You had been so obliging as to send me trees by his vessel, put into a tub or tubs with earth, to preserve them, till the season admits of their being planted. Your Excellency will be pleased to receive my most hearty thanks for this fresh proof of friendship. Believe I shall make an offer of them to Genl...
I was a stranger to the subjects of the present letter when I wrote last week, or should have mentioned them considering their importance. Mr Hancock reports that your Excellency designs quitting the command of the army. I hope he has no good foundation for what he says. I should dread your doing it, did I believe it probable, for I apprehend the cause would suffer amazingly by it, & that the...