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I addressed, at the request of some Gentlemen, a line to you yesterday, introducing the Count de Crillon to your Excellency; and think it expedient to inform you, that I am in every respect uninformed in regard to the politicks of that nobleman, he being to me an entire stranger. Respectfully your Excellency’s unfeigned Friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Later docketed by JM,...
§ Elbridge Gerry to Dolley Madison. 3 March 1814, “Senate Chamber.” “Mr Gerry presents his best respects to Mrs. Madison, & sends a letter this momen⟨t⟩ received from their honest friend at Lynn to herself & a letter accompanying it to himself. The latter contains a paragraph respecting small fishing boats, restrained by the embargo law so as to be useless to their needy owners; to be...
The enclosed petition I have the honor to transmit. It should have been directed to the supreme Executive, & affords me an opportunity of renewing my assurances of perfect esteem & respect, & of my remaining Yours most sincerely The petitioners I have reason to believe, are firm supporters of the national Government RC ( MdHi ). Enclosure not found, but a docket on the cover of the letter...
I inclose the remarks, which I proposed to make, when I had the honor of paying my last respects to you. The delay has been owing, in a great measure, to sickness in my family, but it cannot be attended with any ill consequences. I shall wait on you soon, with the information for explaining such parts of the curious Journal of General Martial, relating to myself, as you was pleased to...
Letter not found: from Elbridge Gerry, 28 Sept. 1777. Gerry docketed the letter that GW wrote him on 26 Sept. in part: “ansd 28th.”
[ Annapolis, 19 May 1784 . Noted in SJL as received 24 May 1784, “inclosing introductory letters.” Letter and enclosures not found.]
Mr. Gerry presents his respectful compliments to the President of the Academy of Arts and Sciences of Massachusetts & incloses him a letter from Mr. Carmichael Chargé des Affairs at the Court of Madrid, part of which was by him intended to be communicated to the Academy. MHi : Adams Papers.
I propose to embark for the United States this day, & have only a moment to inform you that Mr Skipwith will transmit you from Paris the letters which passed between the minister of foreign affairs & myself, just before my departure from that city— The aspect of affairs between the two republicks is very pacific at present on this side the Atlantick; God grant it may be so on my arrival the...
If an answer to the letter, which Your Excellency proposed to write to Mr Pickering on my concerns, is received, I will do myself the honor of waiting on You at any time which may best suit your convenience. Mrs Gerry unites with me in best respects to yourself & Lady, & be assured I remain, Dear Sir, with every sentiment / of attachment, Your / most obedt & very / huml Sert. MHi : Adams Papers.
Shall I request the favor of a letter of introduction to Mr Armstrong, our minister at Paris, for Mrs Blake who is to embark soon for Marseilles, with her little daughter, for her health? This lady is a particular friend of ours, wife of George Blake Esq, district attorney for Massachusetts, & an elegant fine woman: from Marseilles she proposes to proceed to Paris. accept my best wishes for...
I have the honor to enclose a copy of my letter to the Secretary of state, & your pamphlet, with the paragraph which I mentioned. Mrs Gerry unites with me, in best respects to yourself & Lady, & complimts to Mrs Smith and Your family— I remain dear Sir with sincere / attachment Your most / obedt Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
Letter not found: from Elbridge Gerry, 6 Aug. 1776. On 16 Aug. GW wrote to Gerry : “Your favours of the 3d & 6th have come duly to hand.”
I have the pleasure to inform you, that I have just received, by Capt Eaton, the dispatches from the department of State; containing two large & two Small packets—I have the honor / to be my dear Sir with / perfect respect—your sincere friend / & very huml. serv MHi : Adams Papers.
Letter not found: from Elbridge Gerry, 3 Aug. 1776. On 16 Aug. GW wrote to Gerry : “Your favours of the 3d & 6th have come duly to hand.”
Permit me, with great sincerity, to congratulate you on your appointment to the office of Vice-President of the United States. It was in my mind a very desirable object, and a wish which I ardently expressed at the meeting of the electors; but, as we were unanimously of opinion that Mr. Adams’ pretensions to the chair were best, it was impossible to give you any votes without annulling an...
I was arrested in my intention to have left my family in time to have met the Senate on the first day of their Session, by the sudden & severe illness of Mrs Gerry & two children; & after their recovery, did not conceive that the political campaign would open before the newyear, & concluded it best to remain here & avoid the extreme bad roads. The Publick are anxiously waiting the result of...
Being here on a few days visit with Mrs. Gerry to her aged parents, & having left six small children, the eldest of whom has the care of the rest and of the domesticks, I am deprived of the honor of paying my personal respects to you at this time. When I wrote to Mr. Monroe, I supposed he was in Philadelphia: it being so announced in the news papers, his conduct in making an inmate of Paris...
I have read your message, with great attention & pleasure. It is clear, candid, firm & dignified, & cannot fail of convincing G Britain, that your object is just, your demands are reasonable, & that you will support them at all events. In this resolution, you will unite the eastern part of the nation; except british subjects, traders & partizans, who in case of a conflict, would soon...
Here I am, my dear Sir, by the partiality of my friends, & discomfiture of my political enemies; again in the vortex of national politicks. My line of duty is plain & easy, & I shall endeavour to adhere to it. But I must confess, that I am much disappointed in a very pleasing anticipation, an interveiw at the seat of government with my ancient & highly respected friend of Monticello ; for I am...
Your obliging letters of the 12th of may , and 21st of June, I have received; and have taken a step, by accepting the appointment to France, which it is difficult to justify to my family, under existing circumstances. Your information and opinion, which had great influence in this decission; the weighty considerations, that the appointment having been once declined, a second refusal might at...
Whilst the late envoys were in Paris, they recommended Mr William Lee, in a letter to Mr Pickering, as a suitable character for a Consul; & it was expected, he would apply for the consulate of Bourdeaux, which it was then supposed would be vacant: & he now proposes to renew his application. being informed of this circumstance, & having, after the fullest enquiry, & conviction of his merit,...
By the last Post I received from the president of the Senate of Massachusetts a Letter, inclosing the papers herewith transmitted, & requesting me to write to your Excellency on the Subject. As I have no other Knowledge of the Matter, than what is derived from Colo. Gridley’s Letter & the Resolve accompanying it, I can only say, that when your Excellency is at Leisure, if You think it...
§ From Elbridge Gerry. 7 April 1814, Washington. “I have the Honor of enclosing another letter from B General Boyd, on the subject of his rank. I do this, to comply with his manifest wish & expectation, in writing to me on the subject.” RC and enclosure ( DLC ). RC 1 p. The enclosure (3 pp.) was Brig. Gen. John P. Boyd to Gerry, 24 Mar. 1814, stating Boyd’s belief that his merits and...
I had the honor last week of addressing a line of introduction to yourself, of my neighbour John Appleton Esq, stating his desire to be occupied in some public office; and being apprized of his wish to administer the functions of the Marshalls office in regard to Prisoners, it is incumbent on me to be explicit on the subject, by declaring, that this was not my object, but that on the other...
I addressed a line to you yesterday, with a bound collection of Edes’ Gazettes printed in 1775 & 6, to the care of Mr. Marston. I now am honored by yours of the 2d & 9th instant, & am much obliged to you, for their impressive & instruct i ve contents. You are the only friend, & almost the only person of the United States, who is capable of giving full information on the subject of our...
Having transmitted to Mr Pickering, additional documents, numbered from 36 to 50 inclusively, you will probably peruse them. The first, contained a copy of a motion, I made to the other Envoys; to put an end, as early as the 21st of October 1797, to the disgraceful communications of X & Y. at the bottom of the original, is a note in the handwriting of General Pinckney, which shews, that it was...
I am honored by your confidential letter of the 30th of Decer, & am sorry that any event should render it uncertain, whether you shall appoint Consuls to France. that Mr Lee, amidst the interfering applications of so many candidates, should be represented to the President as a Jacobin, is not to my mind, in this epoch of intrigue, slander, injustice, unexpected or extraordinary. but I am...
In a conference with the President of the U.S. at his house on a visit three days after his arrival he informed me that soon after his speech to Congress at the opening of the last session he required of Mr Pickering a copy of my despatches in order to send them to Congress. That after waiting a proper time he sent again to the Secretary for them. That he applied a third time & pressed their...
I am honored by your letters of the 7th and 8th instant. The satisfaction which you are pleased to express at my acceptance of the mission, is the most flattering circumstance of my political concerns. I have taken passage in the ship Union for Rotterdam, & expect to sail in ten days; having notified Mr Pinckney by two vessels which are to sail this day & tomorrow, of this circumstance, & of...
From some circumstances which have come to my knowledge, I am induced to think, that measures are adopted to shake the confidence of Government, in their district attorney, George Blake Esqr. If so, the grounds are said to be, his having had in his office, a brother, & his having associated with native & foreign gentlemen, of different politicks . I regret exceedingly, that reports of this...