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The Congress being Inform’d by a Letter from Genl. Washington, that two Thousand of the Continental Troops at Cambridge and Roxbury are deficient in Fire Arms, and that he has not been able to Purchase the Same from the Inhabitants or Obtain them from the Assemblies of the New England Colonies, have directed the General to make Returns to the Assemblies of the Numbers of men Inlisted from...
Cambridge,10 December 1774. printed : Mass. Provincial Congress, Jours. William Lincoln, ed., The Journals of Each Provincial Congress of Massachusetts in 1774 and 1775, and of the Committee of Safety , Boston, 1838. , p. 73–74. This, the second report on this date of the Committee on the State of the Province, was framed in the form of three resolutions: that the adjournment on 29 October had...
As Congress have authorized your Excellency to send a proper Officer to take the Command in the northern Department; We take the Liberty to signifie to your Excellency that in our Opinion, no Man will be more likely; to restore, Harmony, Order and Discipline, and retrieve our Affairs in that Quarter, than Majr. Genll. Gates. He has on Experience acquired the Confidence, and stands high in the...
Cambridge,10 December 1774. printed : Mass. Provincial Congress, Jours. William Lincoln, ed., The Journals of Each Provincial Congress of Massachusetts in 1774 and 1775, and of the Committee of Safety , Boston, 1838. , p. 69–72. Prepared by a committee appointed 12 October, originally composed of fifteen members: John Hancock, Joseph Hawley, Joseph Warren, Samuel Dexter, Artemas Ward, James...
Mr. Gorham and Mr. Russel, Agents of the Town of Charlestown, have presented to Congress a Petition from the unfortunate Inhabitants of that Place, praying for a Compensation for their Losses. The Petition was drawn in very decent and handsome Terms, containing a lively Description of the Distresses to which the unhappy Petitioners are reduced, from a State of Ease and Affluence; and the...
The Subscribers appointed on the part of Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Burke to consider whether there was an honorable Ground of accomodation between the parties in respect to certain Expressions made use of by Mr. Burke in the house of Representatives on Wednesday last, relatively to an Eulogium pronounced by Mr. Hamilton on general Green on the 4th. of July last, having inquired into the...
The Representation made to your Excellency by a Board of General officers, touching the Inconveniences arising from the Mode in which regimental officers have drawn their Rations, having been committed to Us by Congress, We propose to report the inclosed Resolve, upon which We previously wish to have your Sentiments. We are not to consider the proposal for drawing more provissions than are...
When you can find leisure, read this & the paper enclosed; & I will promise you not to request your attention again political subjects. They relate to our concerns with France & G Britain. On the 27th. of January last, a town meeting was held here, on the subject of the last embargo act. As the federalists conducting it were leading characters, & extremely opposed to Government, & their party...
Permit me, with great sincerity, to congratulate you on your appointment to the office of Vice-President of the United States. It was in my mind a very desirable object, and a wish which I ardently expressed at the meeting of the electors; but, as we were unanimously of opinion that Mr. Adams’ pretensions to the chair were best, it was impossible to give you any votes without annulling an...
On the 22d instant I received your friendly letter of the 29th of march, twenty three days after it was put into the post office. the seal is enclosed, having no impression; but the appearance of having been wet, for the purpose of opening the letter. you can determine whether this was the case, or whether there is a probability of it: be this as it may, the seals of the letters which I have...
The Count de Crillon, son of the celebrated Duke, who beseiged Gibralter, & was famous as a great mi[li]tary character, arrived here a day or two past, & proposes to go on to Washington. He came from England in company with Captain Henry, formerly of our army; whom you probably know, is also a great military character, & in every point, truly respectable. He wishes to pay his personal respects...
I was arrested in my intention to have left my family in time to have met the Senate on the first day of their Session, by the sudden & severe illness of Mrs Gerry & two children; & after their recovery, did not conceive that the political campaign would open before the newyear, & concluded it best to remain here & avoid the extreme bad roads. The Publick are anxiously waiting the result of...
Being here on a few days visit with Mrs. Gerry to her aged parents, & having left six small children, the eldest of whom has the care of the rest and of the domesticks, I am deprived of the honor of paying my personal respects to you at this time. When I wrote to Mr. Monroe, I supposed he was in Philadelphia: it being so announced in the news papers, his conduct in making an inmate of Paris...
I have read your message, with great attention & pleasure. It is clear, candid, firm & dignified, & cannot fail of convincing G Britain, that your object is just, your demands are reasonable, & that you will support them at all events. In this resolution, you will unite the eastern part of the nation; except british subjects, traders & partizans, who in case of a conflict, would soon...
I have heard, Dear Sir, with no small surprize, that charges have been preferred against Doctor Waterhouse, for misconduct as physician of the U. S. marine hospital at Charleston. I have been intimately acquainted with the Doctor for thirty years, so far at least as to have been able to form for myself, a correct opinion, which has ever been a respectful one, of his moral, political, &...
Enclosed is a letter for our commercial agent at Bourdeaux, & I shall be obliged to you for transmitting it, when you write to him. When you have leisure, I shall take it as a favor, if you will peruse a letter of the 7th Novr 1798 from Mr Pickering, & my answer of the 15th of that month, on the subject of the copies, which I had transmitted to him, of Mr Tallyrand’s letters to me, & on the...
Here I am, my dear Sir, by the partiality of my friends, & discomfiture of my political enemies; again in the vortex of national politicks. My line of duty is plain & easy, & I shall endeavour to adhere to it. But I must confess, that I am much disappointed in a very pleasing anticipation, an interveiw at the seat of government with my ancient & highly respected friend of Monticello ; for I am...
I am this Day favoured with yours of the 11th. of Novr., and am unhappy to hear that the Flames of War have burst again in the eastern World, and that there is too much Reason to apprehend they will rage, at an early period, in the western Hemisphere. Nevertheless, if Britain is so much under the Influence of a weak passion, as to indulge it in renewing Hostilities amongst us, we shall meet...
I addressed, at the request of some Gentlemen, a line to you yesterday, introducing the Count de Crillon to your Excellency; and think it expedient to inform you, that I am in every respect uninformed in regard to the politicks of that nobleman, he being to me an entire stranger. Respectfully your Excellency’s unfeigned Friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Later docketed by JM,...
This will be delivered by Mr Jarvis lately of Boston, but formerly of this City, Son in Law to Mr Broom, whom You probably know. I have but two of your Letters unanswered; one of the 27 th of June last, the Objects of which have I think been fully complied with, & the other of Nov r 4, in which I find no Mention of a Letter I wrote You from philadelphia in July last. Congress met in November...
I informed You a few Days since, that Yourself, M r Chancellor Levingston, & M r J Rutledge, were in Nomination for the Court of London, since which many Attempts have been made to determine the Choice, & this Morning it was effected & devolves on Yourself. I am happy to give You this Information, both on publick Consideration, & on the Score of Friendship, the former however being on every...
I Received the Letters, with which you were pleased to favor me per Mr. Fessenden on Saturday last being the 18th Instant, at a Critical Time for the Army posted at Cambridge. The Evening preceeding Orders were Issued in Consequence of a Consultation between the General Officers and Committee of Safety to take possession of Dorchester Hill and Bunkers hill in Charlestown which I must confess...
Your obliging letters of the 12th of may , and 21st of June, I have received; and have taken a step, by accepting the appointment to France, which it is difficult to justify to my family, under existing circumstances. Your information and opinion, which had great influence in this decission; the weighty considerations, that the appointment having been once declined, a second refusal might at...
Whilst the late envoys were in Paris, they recommended Mr William Lee, in a letter to Mr Pickering, as a suitable character for a Consul; & it was expected, he would apply for the consulate of Bourdeaux, which it was then supposed would be vacant: & he now proposes to renew his application. being informed of this circumstance, & having, after the fullest enquiry, & conviction of his merit,...
A few Days since, I rec d your Letter of the 13 th of Decr last, without either of the Arrets therein referred to. from the Cover of the Letter, which is inclosed for your Inspection, I suspect it has been opened, previously to my receiving it; if so, I should be well pleased to know who the person is that is so very curious as to loose his Sense of Honor in this Matter. When I left New York,...
By the last Post I received from the president of the Senate of Massachusetts a Letter, inclosing the papers herewith transmitted, & requesting me to write to your Excellency on the Subject. As I have no other Knowledge of the Matter, than what is derived from Colo. Gridley’s Letter & the Resolve accompanying it, I can only say, that when your Excellency is at Leisure, if You think it...
§ From Elbridge Gerry. 7 April 1814, Washington. “I have the Honor of enclosing another letter from B General Boyd, on the subject of his rank. I do this, to comply with his manifest wish & expectation, in writing to me on the subject.” RC and enclosure ( DLC ). RC 1 p. The enclosure (3 pp.) was Brig. Gen. John P. Boyd to Gerry, 24 Mar. 1814, stating Boyd’s belief that his merits and...
After declaring that neither the Letter from Mr. Marbois nor the conversation respecting the Fishery, Boundaries, Royalists and recommending Moderation in our Demands, are of Weight sufficient to fix in his Mind an opinion, that the Court of France wishes to restrain us in obtaining any Degree of Advantage We could prevail on our Enemies to accord to, the Doctor goes on— “I ought not however...
I had the honor last week of addressing a line of introduction to yourself, of my neighbour John Appleton Esq, stating his desire to be occupied in some public office; and being apprized of his wish to administer the functions of the Marshalls office in regard to Prisoners, it is incumbent on me to be explicit on the subject, by declaring, that this was not my object, but that on the other...
I addressed a line to you yesterday, with a bound collection of Edes’ Gazettes printed in 1775 & 6, to the care of Mr. Marston. I now am honored by yours of the 2d & 9th instant, & am much obliged to you, for their impressive & instruct i ve contents. You are the only friend, & almost the only person of the United States, who is capable of giving full information on the subject of our...