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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Bache, Richard"
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Copy: Historical Society of Pennsylvania I received yours of the 21st of May and am truly sorry to hear of your misfortune. It must however be a consolation to you that it cannot be imputed to any imprudence of your own, and that being yet in the early part of life, industry and good management may in a few years replace what you have lost. But in the mean time your own discretion will suggest...
Reprinted from Mrs. E[lizabeth] D[uane] Gillespie, A Book of Remembrance (Philadelphia and London, 1901), facsimile ALS facing pp. 22–3. I received yours of May 20, as also the preceding Letters mentioned in it. You must have been sensible that I thought the step you had taken, to engage yourself in the Charge of a Family, while your Affairs bore so unpromising an Aspect with Regard to the...
DS : American Philosophical Society <February 17, 1772. Franklin empowers Deborah Franklin and Richard Bache to request and receive payment of all debts due him in America, except those owed him by William Franklin, and to take all legal actions and whatever other lawful steps may be necessary for collecting from the debtors or their executors or administrators. Sealed, stamped, and delivered...
ALS (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society I have not had time to look over the Remarks sent me on Parker’s Account, but shall do it shortly. I am glad you received the Box safe that went by Loxley. I do not wonder that Dry Goods are at present as you say a miserable Concern. After the Non Importation Agreement ended, People crowded in their Goods expecting a lively Demand, and it...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I receiv’d yours of Sept. 1. and am rejoic’d to hear you are all well. Your good Mother and Sisters were so about a Fortnight ago, when I heard from them. The Bill you sent me for £60 Whinney on Smith, Wright & Grey, being good, I return your Note enclos’d and correct’d. There remains Five Guineas unpaid, which you had of me just on your going away,...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I have received yours of Oct. 6 and 13. and Sally’s of Oct. 25. It rejoices me to hear that you are all well, and that Benja. is recovered of the Measles. I will write him a little print Letter, as soon as I hear that he can read Print. Thanks to God, I am perfectly well at present, but being so far advanced in Life, I cannot expect a long...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I received yours of Nov. 3. with the Extracts from Mr. Hooper’s Letter, and Remarks of Mr. Morgan which will come under Consideration in due time. As yet the Grant has not pass’d the Seals, tho’ we are kept in continual Expectation. I am oblig’d to Mr. Baynton and you for the Communication. The Demolishing Fort Pitt was a strange Measure. It might...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress By Capt. All I send a Box directed to you containing a Number of Parcels for different People, which I request you to take care of that they may be carefully delivered. Among the rest there are 5 Doz Maps in a Roll with your Name on the Outside, of which you may take 6 for yourself, send Six to your Brother at Burlington, and give the rest to my...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I received yours of Jan. 4. per Packet but none from Mrs. Franklin, whom you mention as writing at the same time. I lament the Death of my old good Friend Mr. Hall, but am glad to understand he has left a Son fit to carry on the Business, which wish he may do with as good a Character and as good Success as his Father. The Gentleman who reported that...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress The Bearer Mr. Robert Hare visits Philadelphia with a View of establishing himself there or at New York in the Porter-brewing Business. He bears an excellent Character among his Friends here as a very honest, ingenious, amiable Man. I therefore recommend him warmly to your Civilities; and doubt not but you will give him the best Advice and...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I have now before me yours of April 6, and 29, May 21. and June 1. I rejoice with you in the first place on the good News contain’d in your last, that Sally is safely delivered of another Son. I hope he will prove a Blessing to you both. I wish your new Shop Business to prove profitable, and do not doubt it if the Shop is closely attended. Will not...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I wrote to you per Capt. Osborne, and have little to add, but that I had yesterday a Line from Preston expressing their Joy on the News I had communicated to them of their new Relation, that they were all well, and should write to you in a few Days via Liverpoole. This will be delivered to you by Messrs. John Hewson and Nathaniel Norgrove, who are...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I received yours of July 6, by the last Packet that is arriv’d; for we have not yet [that?] of August. I had thoughts of going by this Packet, but various Considerations, some publick and some private, have occurr’d inducing me to postpone my leaving England for another Season. A Bill you drew for £27 18 s. 0 d. on Francis Roper, Mercht in London,...
LS : Mrs. Edward M. Korry, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. (1976); ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society I received Yours of Nov. 20, 30, Dec. 28 and Jan. 1. Before this gets to hand you will have heard that I am displaced, and consequently have it n[o longer] in my Power to assist you in your Views relating [to the Post Office and as things ar]e, I would not wish to see you [concern’d in it. For...
ALS (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society I hear by Mr. Dillwyn that you were all well: But had no Line from you either by him or the Packet. Capt. Falconer tells me the Casks of Types were put into his Cellar, he not knowing who they were for. You will get them there, and store them with the rest. I believe I wrote to this purpose before. I am very hearty, Thanks to God. My Love...
ALS : Yale University Library The Bearer Mr. Ralph Westley, goes to Pennsylvania to look out a proper Tract of good Land, on which to settle some able Norfolk Farmers, who are about to remove thither with their Families. One of whom, Mr. Foulger, is a Relation of mine. As the Farmers of that Country are reckoned the most skilful in England, and the comfortable Settling of these first...
Reprinted from Jared Sparks, ed., The Works of Benjamin Franklin … (10 vols., Boston, 1836–40), VIII , 137–8. This brief note throws no light on its background. Franklin was introducing a “young man” (he was thirty-seven), recommended to him as ingenious and worthy, who at the time was completely unknown and a year and a half later was famous throughout the colonies. Thomas Paine explained...
ALS : Bristol, R.I., Historical Society We hear you have had an Alarm at Philada. I hope no ill consequences have attended it. I wonder I had no Line from you. I make no doubt of our People’s defending their City and Country bravely, on the most trying Occasions. I hear nothing yet of Mr. Goddard, but suppose he is on the Road. I suppose we shall leave this Place next Week. I shall not return...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer Mr. Guez, being well recommended to me as a skilful Surgeon, and otherwise of good Character for his Morals and Prudence, I recommend him to your Civilities and Advice, which as a Stranger he may have occasion for: And as he has not sufficient to pay his Passage here, and will not be able to provide such a Sum immediately there, I desire you to...
ALS : Yale University Library I have just received yours of March 10. and it is the first come to hand from you since my Arrival, tho’ the third you mention to have written. I rejoice to hear that the Family are all well. I did not hear before that they were out of Town. We are all well here. Temple presents his Duty. Ben’s Letter is enclos’d. He dines with me every Sunday and some Holidays....
ALS : State M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin Public Library, Leningrad Enclos’d is a Letter from Ben to his Mother. He chose to write it in French as more familiar to him than English. It is, I assure you, all his own, except the concluding Sentence. He grows fast and tall. There are 4 or 5 English Boys in the School, or I think he would be in danger of losing his English. Your Sisters were well...
ALS : New York Public Library; AL (draft): Library of Congress His Excellency, M. Gerard, who does me the Honour to take Charge of this Letter, goes Minister from this Court to the Congress. He is a Friend to your Country and to your Father, which gives him a double Claim to your Civilities, and to every Kindness in your Power to show him. It is so long since I have heard from you, and there...
Incomplete copy: Library of Congress; extract: reprinted from William Temple Franklin, The Private Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c. … (2nd ed.; 2 vols., London, 1817), I , 40–2. I have received yours of june [Jan.] 16. You observe that you Seldom hear from me, I have the Same reason to complain; but I do not complain of you. This [’Tis] the Loss of Ships, and the Sinking...
Copy: Library of Congress The Bearer, M Vatteville, goes over with Views of establiching himself in our Country. He bears the Character here of a Valuable Man, Likely to make a good and Useful Citizen among us. I recommend him warmly to your Civilities and Counsels. Ben continues well and behaves in his College as one could wish. I am ever Your affectionate father P.S. The Chevalier Crenis has...
Copy: Library of Congress The Bearer, M. Jean Babtiste Charles Pinon Duclos Vulmer, is a young Gentleman of Good family and good Character, who goes to America for the Sake of Seeing that part of the World as a traveller, Your Civilities to him as a stranger of merit will much oblige. Your affectionate father
ALS : New-York Historical Society Messieurs Galatin & De Serres, two young Gentlemen of Geneva, of good Families and very good Characters, having an Inclination to see America; if they should arrive in your City, I recommend them to your Civilities, Counsel and Countenance. I am ever, Your affectionate Father Addressed: To / Richard Bache Esqe / Postmaster General of the / United States /...
Copy: Library of Congress I seldom hear from you or Sally, but I have lately had the satisfaction of hearing of you, that you and yours were all well the Begining of april last. I send you in a Parcel by this Opportunity some of the Correspondence betwen Ben and me. He was well a few weeks since, and very kindly notic’d where he is, by some respectable People. I continue, Thanks to God, well...
LS : Mrs. Richard R. Wood, Wawa, Pennsylvania (1957) I have just received yours of may 2. with the Newspapers which you sent by M. Mease. He sent them up from the L’Orient, not coming to Paris himself. I have desired that you might send me the German Newspapers, but I suppose the Letters did not get to hand. Pray take them in, and send them by Duplicates. They will much oblige some of my...
Reprinted from the Union Art Galleries Sales Catalogue (February 27, 1934), p. 28. I received yours of March 29 by the Nephew of Mr. Gerard; of April 29 by Mrs. Foulk and Fox; of May 2 & July 22. I continue in health, notwithstanding the omission of my yearly Journies, which I have never been able to take since my being in France; being confined necessarily by the Business; but I have a large...
Incomplete AL (draft): Library of Congress; incomplete AL : American Philosophical Society; incomplete ALS : Princeton University Library; incomplete copy and partial ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania I received your pleasing Letters of Jan. 14. & 16. and one since of the 30th of March with the Newspapers. They gave me great Pleasure, as they inform’d of your Health and that of your...