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ALS : American Philosophical Society I am pleas’d to learn by yours of the 12th that you have taken a circumstantial Account of the Appearances at Trumbles’s House, which you think sufficient to establish my new Hypothesis of the Direction of Lightning. Mr. Kinnersley has sent me a Pane of the Glass with a Letter in which he mentions his Suspicions that the Stroke was upwards. I now write him...
ALS : Yale University Library I have yours of the 4th Inst. and find the Election has turn’d out as I expected. I am glad Rutherford has refus’d to undertake the Stage; for I did not like your proposing it to him. I admire Mr. Colden was so unready; I thought every thing had been fully explain’d to him. Poor Mr. Hunter is relaps’d into his last Summer Fever; and has kept his Bed these 8 Days,...
Extract: reprinted from Collections of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1 (1853), 126. Franklin’s letter is known only by this extract quoted in a letter from William Franklin to Charles Thomson, October 3, 1765. The New Jersey governor introduced the passage in these words: “As a farther proof that my father had no hand in the Stamp Act, I will give you an extract of a letter I...
Extract: Historical Society of Pennsylvania Mr. Cooper, Secretary of the Treasury, is our old Acquaintance, and expresses a hearty Friendship for us both. Enclosed I send you his Billet proposing to make me acquainted with Lord Rockingham. I dine with his Lordship To-morrow. I had a long Audience on Wednesday with Lord Dartmouth. He was highly recommended to me by Lords Grantham and...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 280. Great changes being expected keeps men’s minds in suspense, and obstructs public affairs of every kind. It is therefore not to be wondered at, that so little progress is made in our American schemes of the Ilinois grant, and...
ALS : Pierpont Morgan Library Dining to day with Mr. Potts, I hear that Letters go by this Night’s Post to Falmouth for the Chance of reaching the Packet. Therefore I write this Line just to say, that I receiv’d yesterday a Line from the Treasury acquainting me that Mr. Kollock is appointed upon my Recommendation to be Collector of Lewes. I shall be more particular in my next. Your...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin Now for the First Time Published (Boston, 1833), p. 280. The Ilinois affair goes forward but slowly. Lord Shelburne told me again last week, that he highly approved of it, but others were not of his sentiments, particularly the Board of Trade. Lyman is...
MS not found; reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c . (quarto edition, London, 1817–18), II, 143–4. I have no letter of yours since my last, in which I answered all preceding ones. Last week I dined at Lord Shelburne’s, and had a long conversation with him and Mr. Conway (there being no other company), on the subject...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.], A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 281. I returned last night from Paris, and just now hear that the Ilinois settlement is approved of in the Cabinet Council, so far as to be referred to the Board of Trade for their opinion, who are to consider it next week. Shelburne...
MS not found; extract reprinted from [Jared Sparks, ed.,] A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin Now for the First Time Published (Boston, 1833), pp. 281–2. Since my return, the affair of the Ilinois settlement has been renewed. The King in Council referred the proposal to the Board of Trade, who called for the opinion of the merchants on two points,...
MS not found; reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c ., Quarto Edition, II , printed with separate title as The Private Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c . (London, 1817), pp. 144–6; also [William Duane, ed.,] The Works of Dr. Benjamin Franklin , VI (Philadelphia, 1817), 255–7; MS extracts:...
MS not found; extract reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c ., I (quarto edit., London, 1818), 125–6 note. The paragraphs printed here form one of two documents William Temple Franklin printed at widely separated points in his edition of his grandfather’s writings, both of which he said were letters to William...
MS not found; extract reprinted in part from The Pennsylvania Chronicle, And Universal Advertiser , March 7–14, 1768, and in part from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D. F.R.S. &c ., II , The Private Correspondence (quarto edition, London, 1817), 149–50. The paragraphs printed here form the second of two documents that William Temple...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c. (quarto edition, 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 151. We have had so many alarms of changes which did not take place, that just when I wrote it was thought the ministry would stand their ground. However immediately after the talk was renewed, and it soon appeared the Sunday...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c. (quarto edition, 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 156–9; fragment of AL in Yale University Library. I have received all together your letters of January 6, 21, and 22: it had been a great while that I had not heard from you. The purpose of settling the new colonies seems at...
Extract: reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c. (quarto edition, 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 161–2. Since my last, a long one of March 13, nothing has been talked or thought of here but elections. There have been amazing contests all over the kingdom, £20 or 30,000 of a side spent in several places, and...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, LL.D., F.R.S., &c. (quarto edition, 3 vols., London, 1817–18), II , 164–8. Since my last I have received yours of May 10 dated at Amboy, which I shall answer particularly by next week’s packet. I purpose now to take notice of that part wherein you say it was reported at Philadelphia I was to be...
Two extracts: one printed in The Pennsylvania Chronicle , December 26-January 2, 1769, the other a MS copy, American Philosophical Society. The Harvest here is well got in, and is said to be a plentiful one; tho’ I never knew so wet a Summer. No great Matters have been in Agitation lately, this not being a Season of much Business. The sending a new Chief Governor to Virginia in the Place of...
Extract: reprinted from a quotation by William Franklin in a letter of January 1, 1770, Stan V. Henkels, Catalogue , No. 860 (April 9, 1901), p. 9. It is very uncertain as yet what Turn American Affairs will take here on the Meeting of Parliament. The Friends of both Countries wish a reconciliation; the Enemies of either endeavour to widen the Breach, God knows how it will end.
Extract: Historical Society of Pennsylvania What you say with regard to advancing Money for Building Mills, Bloomeries, &c. has a good deal in it, and I believe most of the Persons concerned will think with you when the Settlement comes under Consideration. I sent you a Part of L. Evans’s Map, containing the Bounds of the intended Province: You see by that, that the Scheme is much enlarg’d...
AL (incomplete draft ): American Philosophical Society It is long since I have heard from you. The last Packet brought me no Letter, and there are two Packets now due. It is supposed that the long easterly Winds have kept them back. We have had a severe and tedious Winter here. There is not yet the smallest Appearance of Spring. Not a Bud has push’d out, nor a Blade of Grass. The Turnips that...
ALS (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society I have now before me yours of July 3. Aug. 3. Sept. 3. and Nov. 5. All but the last came in my Absence, which is the Reason they were not immediately answer’d. In yours of July 3. you mention some Complaisance of Lord H’s towards you, that show’d a Disposition of being upon better Terms. His Behaviour to me in Ireland corresponds exactly....
ALS (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society This will be delivered to you by the Revd. Mr. Coombe, whom I recommend to your Friendship as a young Gentleman of great Merit, Integrity, and Abilities. He has acquir’d the Esteem of all that knew him here, not as an excellent Preacher only, but as practising the Morality he preaches. I wish him a good Settlement in his Native Country,...
AL (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society [I have rec]eived yours of Mar. 2, with the Bill in[closed] [ torn ] on the Society for £25 Sterling, which is [entered to your?] Credit. I have paid for you lately a [bill in the amount of?] £4 10 s. 6 d. to one Main’s a Shoemaker, [ torn ] by Order of Mrs. Clarke. And on [ torn ] several Sums of which I cannot [now recollect the full?]...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 171. At length we have got rid of Lord Hillsborough, and Lord Dartmouth takes his place, to the great satisfaction of all the friends of America. You will hear it said among you (I suppose) that the interest of the Ohio planters has ousted him, but the...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18) II , 171–3. I received yours of June 30. I am vexed that my letter to you, written at Glasgow, miscarried; not so much that you did not receive it, as that it is probably in other hands. It contained some accounts of what passed in Ireland, which were for you...
Extract: Library of Congress In yours of May 14th, you acquaint me with your indisposition, which gave me great concern. The resolution you have taken to use more exercise is extremely proper, and I hope you will steadily perform it. It is of the greatest importance to prevent diseases; since the cure of them by physic is so very precarious. In considering the different kinds of exercise, I...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I received yours of Sept. 1. with one enclos’d for Mrs. Clarke, which I immediately forwarded to Bristol; but she call’d on me two Days after to enquire how you did. She returns into Oxfordshire for the present, and after some time to Bristol again. I am glad you have satisfied Hayne that he went on a Fools Errand. There is no convincing those People...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I wrote to you per the October Packet, and have not since had any Line from you. I spent 16 Days at Lord Le Despencer’s most agreably, and return’d in good Health and Spirits. Lord Dartmouth came to town last Week, and had his first Levee on Wednesday, at which I attended. He receiv’d me very politely in his Room, only Secy. Pownal present;...
ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress I have received yours of Oct. 4. 8. and 13. I cannot imagine what became of my Letter of Augt. 3. from May Place. It was however of no great Importance. Mr. Denormandie is gone this Day to Geneva. I gave him a Letter of Recommendation to a Friend there. I am persuaded that your Packets were not open’d at the Office; for tho’ a Secretary of State has...