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Documents filtered by: Author="First Joint Commission at Paris"
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Passy, 16 July 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:164 . The Commissioners told Sartine that the congress and the authorities in Massachusetts would be notified of his request, but that the presence of British warships on the Newfoundland and Halifax stations might make assistance to...
printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:99–100 . The Commissioners requested that they be given permission to confine on French soil the prisoners taken by American vessels in order to permit their exchange for American prisoners held in England, a question of particular urgency because of John...
We have received your Letter of the twenty second of September, and take this Opportunity to say, that We have no Authority, either to give you Orders or Advice, any further than respects the large Sum of Money, which the Commissioners put into your Hands sometime ago. Of the Expenditure of this Money, We have demanded an Account, which you have refused to give Us. With your private Concerns...
Passy, 16 July 1778. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:162–163 . The Commissioners informed Whipple of Thomas Simpson’s appointment to command the Ranger as part of a force under Whipple’s overall direction. He was ordered to make every effort to take or destroy the Jersey and Guernsey...
We herewith communicate to your Excellency a Resolution of Congress relative to the Treaties, which we request may be laid before the King. Thereby his Majesty will perceive the unfeigned Sentiments of that Body, as well as those of the whole American People, whose Hearts the King has gained by his great Benevolence towards them, manifested in these Treaties, which has made so deep an...
To His Excellency Count de Vergennes, Minister & Secretary of State for foreign Affairs: At the time the American War began there was very little real Money in that Country, the same having been constantly drawn out as fast as it came in to pay for British Manufactures and Importations of foreign Goods by the British Merchants, with the Duties and other Expences occasioned by their Monopoly....
We had this Morning the Honour of receiving your Excellency’s Letter of the 13. Instant relative to the Boston Frigate. We beg leave to assure your Excellency that the Frigate called the Boston, now at Bourdeaux, is a Ship of War belonging to the 13 United States of North America, built and maintained at their Expence, by the Honourable Congress. We therefore, humbly presume that his Majestys...
We have this Morning the Honour of your Excellencys Letter of the Sixteenth, relative to the french Brigantine the Isabella retaken, by the American Privateer the General Mifflin, from a Guernsey Privateer, after having been Eighty Hours in his Hands. We have the Honour to agree perfectly, with your Excellency, in your Sentiments of the Justice and Policy of the Principle of Reciprocity...
We are honoured with yours of without a date. We wrote you on the Second of this Month to which We refer. We have written to Mr. Gilbank several Times that We could furnish him with no more Money, and that We should protest his Bills. If he will not believe Us, When the Bills arrive if they ever do, which We hope they will not, our Protest Refusal and the consequent Protest Will Convince him....
We duely received your Letter, dated at Bourdeaux the 1st. Instant, and congratulate you, on your Safe Arrival, as well as on your good Fortune in taking, the Ship Martha, which We wish Safe to Port. We approve of your Zeal and Industry in taking upon you to get the Frigate, as far in Readiness as possible, for the Sea, during the Absence of Captain Palmes. As the Number of your Men, has been...